2 edited body
source | link

The way it was explained to me once is that it was a literal interpretation of Christ's commission to take up histhe cross and follow him.

"Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me." (Matt 16:24; see also Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23; Matt 10:21;)

The Encyclopedia Britannica attributes Emperor Constantine as the one that initiated the use of the cross as a symbol of Christianity:

[...] Before the time of the emperor Constantine in the 4th century, Christians were extremely reticent about portraying the cross because too open a display of it might expose them to ridicule or danger. After Constantine converted to Christianity, he abolished crucifixion as a death penalty and promoted, as symbols of the Christian faith, both the cross and the chi-rho monogram of the name of Christ. The symbols became immensely popular in Christian art and funerary monuments from c. 350.

The way it was explained to me once is that it was a literal interpretation of Christ's commission to take up his cross and follow him.

"Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me." (Matt 16:24; see also Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23; Matt 10:21;)

The Encyclopedia Britannica attributes Emperor Constantine as the one that initiated the use of the cross as a symbol of Christianity:

[...] Before the time of the emperor Constantine in the 4th century, Christians were extremely reticent about portraying the cross because too open a display of it might expose them to ridicule or danger. After Constantine converted to Christianity, he abolished crucifixion as a death penalty and promoted, as symbols of the Christian faith, both the cross and the chi-rho monogram of the name of Christ. The symbols became immensely popular in Christian art and funerary monuments from c. 350.

The way it was explained to me once is that it was a literal interpretation of Christ's commission to take up the cross and follow him.

"Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me." (Matt 16:24; see also Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23; Matt 10:21;)

The Encyclopedia Britannica attributes Emperor Constantine as the one that initiated the use of the cross as a symbol of Christianity:

[...] Before the time of the emperor Constantine in the 4th century, Christians were extremely reticent about portraying the cross because too open a display of it might expose them to ridicule or danger. After Constantine converted to Christianity, he abolished crucifixion as a death penalty and promoted, as symbols of the Christian faith, both the cross and the chi-rho monogram of the name of Christ. The symbols became immensely popular in Christian art and funerary monuments from c. 350.

1
source | link

The way it was explained to me once is that it was a literal interpretation of Christ's commission to take up his cross and follow him.

"Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me." (Matt 16:24; see also Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23; Matt 10:21;)

The Encyclopedia Britannica attributes Emperor Constantine as the one that initiated the use of the cross as a symbol of Christianity:

[...] Before the time of the emperor Constantine in the 4th century, Christians were extremely reticent about portraying the cross because too open a display of it might expose them to ridicule or danger. After Constantine converted to Christianity, he abolished crucifixion as a death penalty and promoted, as symbols of the Christian faith, both the cross and the chi-rho monogram of the name of Christ. The symbols became immensely popular in Christian art and funerary monuments from c. 350.