2 Updated to better state my points
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My reply is generic because not all Protestants believe the same things, there is a great variance with that wide-ranging, generic term which historically refers to protesting against the Catholic Church or what it believes.

For the first replier, it certainly has nothing to do with vain repetitions, otherwise Protestants would only pray the Our Father once in their lives, yet when Jesus was teaching his disciples to pray, that is what he told them to say. The Liturgy of the Hours is not nearly as repetitious overall.

I would sayIt seems to me it was probably a combination of the knee-jerk reaction and being repulsed by anything Catholic, based upon my own experiences in leaving and returning to the Catholic Church (for completely different reasons: I left because I was uncatechized and I could not answer the criticisms & returned as I became convinced the Catholic Church was correct). It wasseems more a reactionary, emotional reaction, not a well thought outpremeditated plan to reject something bad in Catholicism. Surely no thinkingbelieving Protestant, nor one who loves God would ever reject all the recitation of the Psalms and antiphons, Scripture readings, etc. which are mostly directly from Scripture or derived from Scripture. Surely it's not the plethora of readings from a variety of Scriptural books. They may raise an objection to the so-called "Catholic" books of Scripture, but this is a smaller subset of the Scripture readings and is in the minority because percentage-wise, there are only 7 books and a couple chapters that are objected to compared with a much larger number of66 books on which we all agree.

For the first replier, it certainly has nothing to do with vain repetitions, otherwise Protestants would only pray the Our Father once in their lives, yet when Jesus was teaching his disciples to pray, that is what he told them to say. The Liturgy of the Hours is not nearly as repetitious overall.

I would say it was a combination of the knee-jerk reaction and being repulsed by anything Catholic. It was more a reactionary, emotional reaction, not a well thought out plan to reject something bad in Catholicism. Surely no thinking Protestant, nor one who loves God would ever reject all the recitation of the Psalms and antiphons which are mostly directly from Scripture or derived from Scripture. Surely it's not the plethora of readings from a variety of Scriptural books. They may raise an objection to the so-called "Catholic" books of Scripture, but this is a smaller subset of the Scripture readings and is in the minority because percentage-wise, there are only 7 books and a couple chapters that are objected to compared with a much larger number of books on which we all agree.

My reply is generic because not all Protestants believe the same things, there is a great variance with that wide-ranging, generic term which historically refers to protesting against the Catholic Church or what it believes.

For the first replier, it certainly has nothing to do with vain repetitions, otherwise Protestants would only pray the Our Father once in their lives, yet when Jesus was teaching his disciples to pray, that is what he told them to say. The Liturgy of the Hours is not nearly as repetitious overall.

It seems to me it was probably a combination of the knee-jerk reaction and being repulsed by anything Catholic, based upon my own experiences in leaving and returning to the Catholic Church (for completely different reasons: I left because I was uncatechized and I could not answer the criticisms & returned as I became convinced the Catholic Church was correct). It seems more a emotional reaction, not a premeditated plan to reject something bad in Catholicism. Surely no believing Protestant who loves God would ever reject the recitation of the Psalms, Scripture readings, etc. which are mostly directly from Scripture. They may raise an objection to the so-called "Catholic" books of Scripture, but this is a smaller subset of the readings and is in the minority because percentage-wise, there are only 7 books and a couple chapters that are objected to compared with a 66 books on which we all agree.

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For the first replier, it certainly has nothing to do with vain repetitions, otherwise Protestants would only pray the Our Father once in their lives, yet when Jesus was teaching his disciples to pray, that is what he told them to say. The Liturgy of the Hours is not nearly as repetitious overall.

I would say it was a combination of the knee-jerk reaction and being repulsed by anything Catholic. It was more a reactionary, emotional reaction, not a well thought out plan to reject something bad in Catholicism. Surely no thinking Protestant, nor one who loves God would ever reject all the recitation of the Psalms and antiphons which are mostly directly from Scripture or derived from Scripture. Surely it's not the plethora of readings from a variety of Scriptural books. They may raise an objection to the so-called "Catholic" books of Scripture, but this is a smaller subset of the Scripture readings and is in the minority because percentage-wise, there are only 7 books and a couple chapters that are objected to compared with a much larger number of books on which we all agree.