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Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up with the most probable yet not all-encompassing conclusions.

Here's a list with (I think) the most probable reasons to the least probable.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out--baby and bath water.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only or best time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.

  • ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up with the most probable yet not all-encompassing conclusions.

Here's a list with (I think) the most probable reasons to the least probable.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out--baby and bath water.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.

  • ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up with the most probable yet not all-encompassing conclusions.

Here's a list with (I think) the most probable reasons to the least probable.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out--baby and bath water.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only or best time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.

  • ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.
    Bounty Ended with 50 reputation awarded by Pavel
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Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. AllFurthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common/popular Protestant beliefs and come up with the bestmost probable yet not all-encompassing conclusions.

Here's a list with (I think) the most probable reasons to the least probable.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out--baby and bath water.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's not in the Bible.Catholic, and Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine excepttend to buck against anything that which is explicitly stated in the scripturesCatholics promote.

  • ...it's Catholic, andnot in the Bible. Protestants tend to buck against anythingare all about accepting no doctrine except that Catholics promotewhich is explicitly stated in the scriptures.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer. All you can do is summarize the most common/popular Protestant beliefs and come up with the best conclusions.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.

  • ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up with the most probable yet not all-encompassing conclusions.

Here's a list with (I think) the most probable reasons to the least probable.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out--baby and bath water.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.

  • ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.
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Protestants are more than likelymore than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  1. ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  2. ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  3. ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out.

  4. ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.
  5. ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.
  6. ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.
  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.

  • ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  1. ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  2. ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  3. ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out.

  4. ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.
  5. ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.
  6. ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.

Protestants are more than likely not going to follow Liturgy of The Hours because...

  • ...there are prayers to the saints/dead, which Protestants believe isn't good, so they'll throw whole Liturgy out.
  • ...it makes the prayer seem insincere, as opposed to a sincere, unscripted, heart-felt prayer conversation with God. The Protestant would cite this verse as their reasoning:

    Psalm 62:8 ESV Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

  • ...setting a required time to pray gives the impression that that is the only time one needs to pray, when prayers should be constant. The Protestant would cite these verses as their reasoning:

    1 Thessalonians 5:17 ESV ...pray without ceasing.

    1 Thessalonians 1:2 ESV We give thanks to God always for all of you, constantly mentioning you in our prayers,

    2 Timothy 1:3 ESV I thank God whom I serve, as did my ancestors, with a clear conscience, as I remember you constantly in my prayers night and day.

  • ...it's not in the Bible. Protestants are all about accepting no doctrine except that which is explicitly stated in the scriptures.

  • ...it's Catholic, and Protestants tend to buck against anything that Catholics promote.
  • ...it's unnecessary. While more open-minded Protestants may consider the Liturgy of the Hours helpful in its structure (ignoring prayers to the saints/dead), many would categorize it as just another reading/prayer plan similar to ones you could buy at a Christian bookstore. They give it no added spiritual significance.
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