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A fundamental issue here is that the term "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense where some groupsself-identified Christians are excluded, one needs to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge among groups. One common standard is the set of ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject. Conversely, JWs reject trinitarians as genuine Christians for the opposite reason -- because they adhere to the ecumenical creeds, which JWs consider to be a blasphemous tradition, or because they reject the authority of the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses. (Similar things could be said about Protestants and Catholics and the authority of the Pope and Tradition, though things have mellowed since Vatican II.)

As a specific example, in a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning.) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and are therefore not Christians, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

A fundamental issue here is that the term "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense where some groups are excluded, one needs to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge among groups. One common standard is the set of ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject. Conversely, JWs reject trinitarians as genuine Christians for the opposite reason -- because they adhere to the ecumenical creeds, which JWs consider to be a blasphemous tradition, or because they reject the authority of the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses. (Similar things could be said about Protestants and Catholics and the authority of the Pope and Tradition, though things have mellowed since Vatican II.)

As a specific example, in a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning.) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and are therefore not Christians, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

A fundamental issue here is that the term "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense where some self-identified Christians are excluded, one needs to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge among groups. One common standard is the set of ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject. Conversely, JWs reject trinitarians as genuine Christians for the opposite reason -- because they adhere to the ecumenical creeds, which JWs consider to be a blasphemous tradition, or because they reject the authority of the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses. (Similar things could be said about Protestants and Catholics and the authority of the Pope and Tradition, though things have mellowed since Vatican II.)

As a specific example, in a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning.) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and are therefore not Christians, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

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TheA fundamental problemissue here is that the term "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense where some groups are excluded, one would needneeds to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge among groups. One common standard areis the set of ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject. Conversely, JWs reject trinitarians as genuine Christians for the opposite reason -- because they adhere to the ecumenical creeds, which JWs consider to be a blasphemous tradition, or because they reject the authority of the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses. (Similar things could be said about Protestants and Catholics and the authority of the Pope and Tradition, though things have mellowed since Vatican II.)

InAs a specific example, in a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning.) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and are therefore not Christians, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," or followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

The fundamental problem here is that "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense, one would need to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge groups. One common standard are the ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject.

In a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning.) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," or followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

A fundamental issue here is that the term "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense where some groups are excluded, one needs to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge among groups. One common standard is the set of ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject. Conversely, JWs reject trinitarians as genuine Christians for the opposite reason -- because they adhere to the ecumenical creeds, which JWs consider to be a blasphemous tradition, or because they reject the authority of the Governing Body of Jehovah's Witnesses. (Similar things could be said about Protestants and Catholics and the authority of the Pope and Tradition, though things have mellowed since Vatican II.)

As a specific example, in a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning.) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and are therefore not Christians, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

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The fundamental problem here is that "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense, one would need to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge groups. One common standard are the ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject.

In a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning).) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," or followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

The fundamental problem here is that "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense, one would need to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge groups. One common standard are the ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject.

In a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning). Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," or followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

The fundamental problem here is that "Christian" admits different meanings. In a broad sense, a Christian is anyone who self-identifies as a follower of Jesus Christ (cf. Acts 11:26), which would include all bodies such as Catholics, Orthodox, Anglicans, Protestants, and Restorationists (including JWs and Mormons).

To use "Christian" in a narrower sense, one would need to choose some criterion of orthodoxy by which to judge groups. One common standard are the ecumenical creeds, which JWs and Mormons reject.

In a debate from a few years back, evangelical Albert Mohler and Mormon Orson Scott Card went back and forth about whether Mormons are Christians. (The debate is hard to navigate, but it's all there; use the "previous" button at the bottom to get back to the beginning.) Mohler argues, in short, that Mormons don't hold to the ecumenical creeds about the nature of God and Christ, which the wide majority of Christians share, and Card responds by saying that Mormons are "non-traditional Christians," or followers of Christ who reject the tradition embodied in the creeds.

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