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Apart from above I also stumbled upon a strong biblical support for this date:

Jewish tradition use two kinds of calenders, one is Civil calender which is meant exclusively for kings, childbirth n contracts. The second was Sacred calender for religious festivals. Following are the months of Jewish Civil calender:

Tishri overlaps on Sept. to Oct. and is the first month.

Heshvan overlaps on Oct to Nov,

Chislev overlaps on Nov to Dec. and so on;

Next is Tebeth,

Shebat,

Adar,

Nisan,

Iyar,

Sivan,

Tammuz,

Ab and

Elul.

Now Luke in verse 1:26 says that it was in the sixth month angel Ganriel was sent to Mary, meaning it was month of Adar which overlaps on Feb to March. If we take this as the time of Jesus' conception then we come close to Nov to Dec after nine months. So this is a strong biblical support for Christmas to be in December.

Further Luke says at verse 1:36, that it is now sixth month for Elisabeth's pregrency, meaning St. John the Baptist was born in the month of Sivan which is somewhere June and that is how we are celebrating his day on 24 th June.

Let me add here: We do not find any historical date in Bible, may be for obvious reason since the bottom line in Bible was to deliver a message of Salvation and not a historical record of events that took place. Notwithstanding this, there is always an urge in humans to remember and celebrate those events, which influenced their destiny. That urge gradually led the early Christian to commemorate all those sacred events that took place in life of our Lord as remembrance and veneration of our Lord. Savior and Emmanuel (God with us) spent His life as one of us and like us among us the earthly creatures. His birth, death and whatever mighty deeds He carried out are by no means any ordinary events.

Apart from above I also stumbled upon a strong biblical support for this date:

Jewish tradition use two kinds of calenders, one is Civil calender which is meant exclusively for kings, childbirth n contracts. The second was Sacred calender for religious festivals. Following are the months of Jewish Civil calender:

Tishri overlaps on Sept. to Oct. and is the first month.

Heshvan overlaps on Oct to Nov,

Chislev overlaps on Nov to Dec. and so on;

Next is Tebeth,

Shebat,

Adar,

Nisan,

Iyar,

Sivan,

Tammuz,

Ab and

Elul.

Now Luke in verse 1:26 says that it was in the sixth month angel Ganriel was sent to Mary, meaning it was month of Adar which overlaps on Feb to March. If we take this as the time of Jesus' conception then we come close to Nov to Dec after nine months. So this is a strong biblical support for Christmas to be in December.

Further Luke says at verse 1:36, that it is now sixth month for Elisabeth's pregrency, meaning St. John the Baptist was born in the month of Sivan which is somewhere June and that is how we are celebrating his day on 24 th June.

Let me add here: We do not find any historical date in Bible, may be for obvious reason since the bottom line in Bible was to deliver a message of Salvation and not a historical record of events that took place. Notwithstanding this, there is always an urge in humans to remember and celebrate those events, which influenced their destiny. That urge gradually led the early Christian to commemorate all those sacred events that took place in life of our Lord as remembrance and veneration of our Lord. Savior and Emmanuel (God with us) spent His life as one of us and like us among us the earthly creatures. His birth, death and whatever mighty deeds He carried out are by no means any ordinary events.

Let me add here: We do not find any historical date in Bible, may be for obvious reason since the bottom line in Bible was to deliver a message of Salvation and not a historical record of events that took place. Notwithstanding this, there is always an urge in humans to remember and celebrate those events, which influenced their destiny. That urge gradually led the early Christian to commemorate all those sacred events that took place in life of our Lord as remembrance and veneration of our Lord. Savior and Emmanuel (God with us) spent His life as one of us and like us among us the earthly creatures. His birth, death and whatever mighty deeds He carried out are by no means any ordinary events.

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Apart from above I also stumbled upon a strong biblical support for this date:

Jewish tradition use two kinds of calenders, one is Civil calender which is meant exclusively for kings, childbirth n contracts. The second was Sacred calender for religious festivals. Following are the months of Jewish Civil calender:

Tishri overlaps on Sept. to Oct. and is the first month.

Heshvan overlaps on Oct to Nov,

Chislev overlaps on Nov to Dec. and so on;

Next is Tebeth,

Shebat,

Adar,

Nisan,

Iyar,

Sivan,

Tammuz,

Ab and

Elul.

Now Luke in verse 1:26 says that it was in the sixth month angel Ganriel was sent to Mary, meaning it was month of Adar which overlaps on Feb to March. If we take this as the time of Jesus' conception then we come close to Nov to Dec after nine months. So this is a strong biblical support for Christmas to be in December.

Further Luke says at verse 1:36, that it is now sixth month for Elisabeth's pregrency, meaning St. John the Baptist was born in the month of Sivan which is somewhere June and that is how we are celebrating his day on 24 th June.

Let me add here: We do not find any historical date in Bible, may be for obvious reason since the bottom line in Bible was to deliver a message of Salvation and not a historical record of events that took place. Notwithstanding this, there is always an urge in humans to remember and celebrate those events, which influenced their destiny. That urge gradually led the early Christian to commemorate all those sacred events that took place in life of our Lord as remembrance and veneration of our Lord. Savior and Emmanuel (God with us) spent His life as one of us and like us among us the earthly creatures. His birth, death and whatever mighty deeds He carried out are by no means any ordinary events.

Let me add here: We do not find any historical date in Bible, may be for obvious reason since the bottom line in Bible was to deliver a message of Salvation and not a historical record of events that took place. Notwithstanding this, there is always an urge in humans to remember and celebrate those events, which influenced their destiny. That urge gradually led the early Christian to commemorate all those sacred events that took place in life of our Lord as remembrance and veneration of our Lord. Savior and Emmanuel (God with us) spent His life as one of us and like us among us the earthly creatures. His birth, death and whatever mighty deeds He carried out are by no means any ordinary events.

Apart from above I also stumbled upon a strong biblical support for this date:

Jewish tradition use two kinds of calenders, one is Civil calender which is meant exclusively for kings, childbirth n contracts. The second was Sacred calender for religious festivals. Following are the months of Jewish Civil calender:

Tishri overlaps on Sept. to Oct. and is the first month.

Heshvan overlaps on Oct to Nov,

Chislev overlaps on Nov to Dec. and so on;

Next is Tebeth,

Shebat,

Adar,

Nisan,

Iyar,

Sivan,

Tammuz,

Ab and

Elul.

Now Luke in verse 1:26 says that it was in the sixth month angel Ganriel was sent to Mary, meaning it was month of Adar which overlaps on Feb to March. If we take this as the time of Jesus' conception then we come close to Nov to Dec after nine months. So this is a strong biblical support for Christmas to be in December.

Further Luke says at verse 1:36, that it is now sixth month for Elisabeth's pregrency, meaning St. John the Baptist was born in the month of Sivan which is somewhere June and that is how we are celebrating his day on 24 th June.

Let me add here: We do not find any historical date in Bible, may be for obvious reason since the bottom line in Bible was to deliver a message of Salvation and not a historical record of events that took place. Notwithstanding this, there is always an urge in humans to remember and celebrate those events, which influenced their destiny. That urge gradually led the early Christian to commemorate all those sacred events that took place in life of our Lord as remembrance and veneration of our Lord. Savior and Emmanuel (God with us) spent His life as one of us and like us among us the earthly creatures. His birth, death and whatever mighty deeds He carried out are by no means any ordinary events.

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"Chronograph" – a document dating to 354 AD in Rome. "Chronograph" 1a document dating to 354 AD 2 in Rome: This was a list of martyrs and their birth dates, and a list of bishops of Rome and their birth dates. The Chronograph lists these dates (birth dates) in calendar order. The first date listed is the "8th of Kalens of January" ("Kalens" is used to refer to the first of a month – putting a number in front of it counts backward.) This translates to our December 25th. The notation in the Chronograph is that this is the birth of Christ in Bethlehem.

Augustine opposed the Donatists. He noted 3 that "the Donatists do not celebrate Epiphany", which was started as a celebration of the baptism of Jesus. Apparently, the Donatists celebrated Christmas – Augustine doesn’t say that they didn’t. This would push the celebration of Christmas back to before 311 – the time of the Donatist split.

In 274 AD, Aurelius established December 25th (the winter solstice) as the Birth of the Sun Unconquered (Natales Soli Invicti). This is probably where we get the idea that Christmas is a pagan holiday. Note that even as early as the 12th century, it was thought that December 25th was co-opted from the pagans. EVEN IF it was co-opted, it was infused with new meaning by the best theologians of the time. But there is good evidence that a date of December 25th is true – it just happened to fall on the winter solstice. Early Christians believed that December 25 was the true day. It is likely that the early Christians would try to identify the birth day of their Saviour.

"De Solstitiis""De Solstitiis" – a North African document from the 300’s attempts to determine the date of Christ’s birth entirely from the evidence given in Scripture. It assumes a date of March 25th for Christ’s death (Passover).

Because paganism was prevailing during the early years of Christianity, just by relating any event in Christian practice to a pagan practice is easiest way to create doubt in minds of believers by saying that it relates to pagan practice.


1 The Chronography of 354. Introduction to the online edition

2 The Manuscripts of the "Chronography/Calendar of 354 A.D."

3 Augustine on Baptism Against the Donatists, Book 6

"Chronograph" – a document dating to 354 AD in Rome. This was a list of martyrs and their birth dates, and a list of bishops of Rome and their birth dates. The Chronograph lists these dates (birth dates) in calendar order. The first date listed is the "8th of Kalens of January" ("Kalens" is used to refer to the first of a month – putting a number in front of it counts backward.) This translates to our December 25th. The notation in the Chronograph is that this is the birth of Christ in Bethlehem.

Augustine opposed the Donatists. He noted that "the Donatists do not celebrate Epiphany", which was started as a celebration of the baptism of Jesus. Apparently, the Donatists celebrated Christmas – Augustine doesn’t say that they didn’t. This would push the celebration of Christmas back to before 311 – the time of the Donatist split.

In 274 AD, Aurelius established December 25th (the winter solstice) as the Birth of the Sun Unconquered (Natales Soli Invicti). This is probably where we get the idea that Christmas is a pagan holiday. Note that even as early as the 12th century, it was thought that December 25th was co-opted from the pagans. EVEN IF it was co-opted, it was infused with new meaning by the best theologians of the time. But there is good evidence that a date of December 25th is true – it just happened to fall on the winter solstice. Early Christians believed that December 25 was the true day. It is likely that the early Christians would try to identify the birth day of their Saviour.

"De Solstitiis" – a North African document from the 300’s attempts to determine the date of Christ’s birth entirely from the evidence given in Scripture. It assumes a date of March 25th for Christ’s death (Passover).

Because paganism was prevailing during the early years of Christianity, just by relating any event in Christian practice to a pagan practice is easiest way to create doubt in minds of believers by saying that it relates to pagan practice.

"Chronograph" 1a document dating to 354 AD 2 in Rome: This was a list of martyrs and their birth dates, and a list of bishops of Rome and their birth dates. The Chronograph lists these dates (birth dates) in calendar order. The first date listed is the "8th of Kalens of January" ("Kalens" is used to refer to the first of a month – putting a number in front of it counts backward.) This translates to our December 25th. The notation in the Chronograph is that this is the birth of Christ in Bethlehem.

Augustine opposed the Donatists. He noted 3 that "the Donatists do not celebrate Epiphany", which was started as a celebration of the baptism of Jesus. Apparently, the Donatists celebrated Christmas – Augustine doesn’t say that they didn’t. This would push the celebration of Christmas back to before 311 – the time of the Donatist split.

Note that even as early as the 12th century, it was thought that December 25th was co-opted from the pagans. EVEN IF it was co-opted, it was infused with new meaning by the best theologians of the time. But there is good evidence that a date of December 25th is true – it just happened to fall on the winter solstice. Early Christians believed that December 25 was the true day. It is likely that the early Christians would try to identify the birth day of their Saviour.

"De Solstitiis" – a North African document from the 300’s attempts to determine the date of Christ’s birth entirely from the evidence given in Scripture. It assumes a date of March 25th for Christ’s death (Passover).

Because paganism was prevailing during the early years of Christianity, just by relating any event in Christian practice to a pagan practice is easiest way to create doubt in minds of believers by saying that it relates to pagan practice.


1 The Chronography of 354. Introduction to the online edition

2 The Manuscripts of the "Chronography/Calendar of 354 A.D."

3 Augustine on Baptism Against the Donatists, Book 6

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