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In Catholic doctrine, a saint has to (a) be “a dead person” and (b) be “in Heaven”.

How is someone deemed a saint? The pope canonizes a dead person who has lived a life of heroic virtue and has performed a posthumous miracle in addition to the miracle required for beatification.
Peter TurnerPeter Turner

Being in Heaven is the definition of a ‘capital-S’ Saint.
Ethel EvansEthel Evans

Alternatively, a saint may be an angel, though this is a different “category” of saint.

Angels, like Saint Michael, may be called Saints but aren’t in quite the same category as human believers.
James T.James T.

So, what is an angelic saint? Are all angels saints, or just some of them? How is this determined?

I can see one possible solution: All angels are in Heaven, and are therefore saints (per Ethel Evans), but they are not ‘deemed’ as saints (or, not canonized), because (per Peter Turner) they are not dead. They are therefore a different ‘category’ of saint (per James T.). This makes sense to me, but is it valid?

In Catholic doctrine, a saint has to (a) be “a dead person” and (b) be “in Heaven”.

How is someone deemed a saint? The pope canonizes a dead person who has lived a life of heroic virtue and has performed a posthumous miracle in addition to the miracle required for beatification.
Peter Turner

Being in Heaven is the definition of a ‘capital-S’ Saint.
Ethel Evans

Alternatively, a saint may be an angel, though this is a different “category” of saint.

Angels, like Saint Michael, may be called Saints but aren’t in quite the same category as human believers.
James T.

So, what is an angelic saint? Are all angels saints, or just some of them? How is this determined?

I can see one possible solution: All angels are in Heaven, and are therefore saints (per Ethel Evans), but they are not ‘deemed’ as saints (or, not canonized), because (per Peter Turner) they are not dead. They are therefore a different ‘category’ of saint (per James T.). This makes sense to me, but is it valid?

In Catholic doctrine, a saint has to (a) be “a dead person” and (b) be “in Heaven”.

How is someone deemed a saint? The pope canonizes a dead person who has lived a life of heroic virtue and has performed a posthumous miracle in addition to the miracle required for beatification.
Peter Turner

Being in Heaven is the definition of a ‘capital-S’ Saint.
Ethel Evans

Alternatively, a saint may be an angel, though this is a different “category” of saint.

Angels, like Saint Michael, may be called Saints but aren’t in quite the same category as human believers.
James T.

So, what is an angelic saint? Are all angels saints, or just some of them? How is this determined?

I can see one possible solution: All angels are in Heaven, and are therefore saints (per Ethel Evans), but they are not ‘deemed’ as saints (or, not canonized), because (per Peter Turner) they are not dead. They are therefore a different ‘category’ of saint (per James T.). This makes sense to me, but is it valid?

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How According to Catholic doctrine, how can an angel be a saint?

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In Catholic doctrine, a saint has to (a) be “a dead person” and (b) be “in Heaven”.

How is someone deemed a saint? The pope canonizes a dead person who has lived a life of heroic virtue and has performed a posthumous miracle in addition to the miracle required for beatification.
Peter Turner

Being in Heaven is the definition of a ‘capital-S’ Saint.
Ethel Evans

Alternatively, a saint may be an angel, though this is a different “category” of saint.

Angels, like Saint Michael, may be called Saints but aren't in quite the same category as human believers.
James T.

Alternatively, a saint may be an angel, though this is a different “category” of saint.

Angels, like Saint Michael, may be called Saints but aren’t in quite the same category as human believers.
James T.

So, what is an angelic saint? Are all angels saints, or just some of them? How is this determined?

I can see one possible solution: All angels are in Heaven, and are therefore saints (per Ethel Evans), but they are not ‘deemed’ as saints (or, not canonized), because (per Peter Turner) they are not dead. They are therefore a different ‘category’ of saint (per James T.). This makes sense to me, but is it valid?

In Catholic doctrine, a saint has to (a) be “a dead person” and (b) be “in Heaven”.

How is someone deemed a saint? The pope canonizes a dead person who has lived a life of heroic virtue and has performed a posthumous miracle in addition to the miracle required for beatification.
Peter Turner

Being in Heaven is the definition of a ‘capital-S’ Saint.
Ethel Evans

Alternatively, a saint may be an angel, though this is a different “category” of saint.

Angels, like Saint Michael, may be called Saints but aren't in quite the same category as human believers.
James T.

So, what is an angelic saint? Are all angels saints, or just some of them? How is this determined?

I can see one possible solution: All angels are in Heaven, and are therefore saints (per Ethel Evans), but they are not ‘deemed’ as saints (or, not canonized), because (per Peter Turner) they are not dead. They are therefore a different ‘category’ of saint (per James T.). This makes sense to me, but is it valid?

In Catholic doctrine, a saint has to (a) be “a dead person” and (b) be “in Heaven”.

How is someone deemed a saint? The pope canonizes a dead person who has lived a life of heroic virtue and has performed a posthumous miracle in addition to the miracle required for beatification.
Peter Turner

Being in Heaven is the definition of a ‘capital-S’ Saint.
Ethel Evans

Alternatively, a saint may be an angel, though this is a different “category” of saint.

Angels, like Saint Michael, may be called Saints but aren’t in quite the same category as human believers.
James T.

So, what is an angelic saint? Are all angels saints, or just some of them? How is this determined?

I can see one possible solution: All angels are in Heaven, and are therefore saints (per Ethel Evans), but they are not ‘deemed’ as saints (or, not canonized), because (per Peter Turner) they are not dead. They are therefore a different ‘category’ of saint (per James T.). This makes sense to me, but is it valid?

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