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Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094What does the Bible say about how we should pray?

Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094

Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

Related question:

What does the Bible say about how we should pray?

5 The paragraph attacking C.S. Lewis adds nothing to the answer. Impugning the questioner does not constitute an answer to the question.
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Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

With respect to why C.S. Lewis was a little more 'poetic' in his own inability to understand a simple solution by straightforward faith, as many bible teachers and bible commentators have understood, is probably C.S Lewis was more of a 'literary expert' than an expert in 'biblical interpretation'. I like C.S. Lewis, but he admitted himself that he did not consider himself to be a 'teacher', he was more like a good 'thinker' who sometimes became philosophical rather than strictly biblical as he pondered the teaching of others. Many of us are the same way. This is why he never seems to have any 'high conviction' making him 'preachy' as though he was 'declaring' the truth. Instead he contemplates the truth. C.S Lewis was not a preacher or teacher. He was a very thoughtful Christian who honestly synthesized Christianity in a literary way with many admirable, honest and truthful traits. That he was honest about those things, which he could not understand, makes him likable, but not everyone is confused about the same things and confusion is not really that profound.

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094

Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

With respect to why C.S. Lewis was a little more 'poetic' in his own inability to understand a simple solution by straightforward faith, as many bible teachers and bible commentators have understood, is probably C.S Lewis was more of a 'literary expert' than an expert in 'biblical interpretation'. I like C.S. Lewis, but he admitted himself that he did not consider himself to be a 'teacher', he was more like a good 'thinker' who sometimes became philosophical rather than strictly biblical as he pondered the teaching of others. Many of us are the same way. This is why he never seems to have any 'high conviction' making him 'preachy' as though he was 'declaring' the truth. Instead he contemplates the truth. C.S Lewis was not a preacher or teacher. He was a very thoughtful Christian who honestly synthesized Christianity in a literary way with many admirable, honest and truthful traits. That he was honest about those things, which he could not understand, makes him likable, but not everyone is confused about the same things and confusion is not really that profound.

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094

Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094

4 fixed narnia statement
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Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

With respect to why C.S. Lewis was a little more 'poetic' in his own inability to understand a simple solution by straightforward faith, as many bible teachers and bible commentators have understood, is probably C.S Lewis was more of a 'literary expert' than an expert in 'biblical interpretation'. I like C.S. Lewis, but he admitted himself that he did not consider himself to be a 'teacher', he was more like a good 'thinker' who sometimes became philosophical rather than strictly biblical as he pondered the teaching of others. Many of us are the same way. This is why he never seems to have any 'high conviction' making him 'preachy' as though he was 'declaring' the truth. Instead he contemplates the truth. C.S Lewis was not a preacher or teacher. He was a very thoughtful Christian who honestly synthesized Christianity in a literary way with many admirable, honest and truthful traits. That he was honest about those things, which he could not understand, makes him likable, but not everyone is confused about the same things and confusion is not really that profound. To show how easily popular misunderstanding can occur about 'deep thinkers' can arise, most Christian's want their children to read the Chronicles of Narnia by because it is 'Christian' but C.S. Lewis actually wrote that series before he became a Christian. 

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094

Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

With respect to why C.S. Lewis was a little more 'poetic' in his own inability to understand a simple solution by straightforward faith, as many bible teachers and bible commentators have understood, is probably C.S Lewis was more of a 'literary expert' than an expert in 'biblical interpretation'. I like C.S. Lewis, but he admitted himself that he did not consider himself to be a 'teacher', he was more like a good 'thinker' who sometimes became philosophical rather than strictly biblical as he pondered the teaching of others. Many of us are the same way. This is why he never seems to have any 'high conviction' making him 'preachy' as though he was 'declaring' the truth. Instead he contemplates the truth. C.S Lewis was not a preacher or teacher. He was a very thoughtful Christian who honestly synthesized Christianity in a literary way with many admirable, honest and truthful traits. That he was honest about those things, which he could not understand, makes him likable, but not everyone is confused about the same things and confusion is not really that profound. To show how easily popular misunderstanding can occur about 'deep thinkers' can arise, most Christian's want their children to read the Chronicles of Narnia by because it is 'Christian' but C.S. Lewis actually wrote that series before he became a Christian.

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094

Personally I have no difficulty with this apparent contradiction. Rather I expect it. This may be because very early in my Christian life it was explained to my satisfaction. It has to do with our basic view of the nature of prayer. Prayer is our response to God after he has put his Sprit within us. It is a ‘spirit’ of prayer. It is our unconscious yearning for his will, often expressed in words.

A constant ‘spirit’ of prayer is in the scripture:

pray without ceasing (1 Thes 5:17, ESV)

This spirit of prayer is a key element in the predicted outpouring of God’s kingdom ushered in through Messiah:

And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. (NIV Zechariah 12:10)

Because you are his sons, God sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, the Spirit who calls out, “Abba, Father.” (NIV Galatians 4:6)

In the same way, the Spirit helps us in our weakness. We do not know what we ought to pray for, but the Spirit himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express. (NIV Romans 8:26)

In this life we desire many things contrary to our prayers so when we express our desires in vocal prayer, sometimes we are asking what we do not want and what is not God’s will. However if we delight in the Lord's will he will gives us the desires of our heart, because our desires will be his will. (Psalm 37:4 ).

In the extreme case where God’s will is leading us into everything that is revolting to human nature and naturally opposed by us, even without sinning our prayer would become very difficult as our spirit would be willing but our flesh would be weak. In this case expressing God’s will in prayer would be to so, if it by thy will let this not happen (as nothing in me natural life desires it), nevertheless thy will be done (as my spirit desires this more, your will in the Spirit of prayer).

With respect to why C.S. Lewis was a little more 'poetic' in his own inability to understand a simple solution by straightforward faith, as many bible teachers and bible commentators have understood, is probably C.S Lewis was more of a 'literary expert' than an expert in 'biblical interpretation'. I like C.S. Lewis, but he admitted himself that he did not consider himself to be a 'teacher', he was more like a good 'thinker' who sometimes became philosophical rather than strictly biblical as he pondered the teaching of others. Many of us are the same way. This is why he never seems to have any 'high conviction' making him 'preachy' as though he was 'declaring' the truth. Instead he contemplates the truth. C.S Lewis was not a preacher or teacher. He was a very thoughtful Christian who honestly synthesized Christianity in a literary way with many admirable, honest and truthful traits. That he was honest about those things, which he could not understand, makes him likable, but not everyone is confused about the same things and confusion is not really that profound.  

Related question:

http://christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/9084/what-does-the-bible-say-about-how-we-should-pray/9094#9094

3 formatting
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2 add c.s. lewis stuff
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