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I like to split hairs.


Jan
2
comment Did God REALLY want to destroy the people of Israel?
@Hammar That there is definitely a whole question to itself! I doubt an answer would fit in a comment (I don't have one offhand) and I don't think it'd be on-topic to address in my answer to this page's question.
Jan
2
answered Did God REALLY want to destroy the people of Israel?
Jan
2
comment Is Hell eternal, or do some/all escape it?
As an annihilationist myself I must say that even Rev. 14:11 doesn't necessarily mean an eternal suffering -- smoke can easily outlast a fire.
Dec
30
comment What is the specific meaning of “day” in Genesis 1?
Rhetorical question: If an author sits down to write for seven days in a row, how much time passes in the story?
Dec
28
comment Is incest a sin?
It's been pointed out to me that if there were other people not descended from Adam, they would not have been subject to original sin, and this might have theological consequences to the idea. (Though the two types of people might be one explanation of the 'sons of God' vs 'daughters of men' in Gen. 6:2 and 6:4.)
Dec
28
comment Is incest a sin?
@Marc Interesting! Are the antediluvians included in that 'all', or only people of the present age? As Noah was descended from Adam, everyone born since the Flood would indeed be descended from Adam as well, whether there were non-Adamic people before the Flood or not.
Dec
28
comment When did the older English spelling of the endings of Isaiah and Elijah stop being used in the Catholic Church?
I can't answer the Catholic parts of the question but if Esaias/Isaias and Elias are used in Catholic contexts it's probably due to their being the names used in Latin (Latin having borrowed the -ias forms from Greek). See Esaias/Isaias and Elias in a Latin dictionary.
Dec
28
comment When did the older English spelling of the endings of Isaiah and Elijah stop being used in the Catholic Church?
The -ias was due to the Greeks. The Greeks would have heard the Hebrew names, which end in -yah(u) as Esaia and Elia. (Greek normally only had 'h' at the beginning of words.) In Greek grammar, though—as is also usual in English and Latin—a name ending in bare -a is considered feminine. But unlike English or Latin, which will leave a man's name in -a alone (English "Joshua", Latin "Dolabella") Greek grammar involves changes to the word which make it similar to more usual forms of men's names. In particular, the nominative has -s added to it. (Google 'Greek first declension' for more.)
Dec
24
comment Is Political Correctness showing shame for our God?
Not all offense is personal indignation, though. It may well be seen a religious offense--a sin, as we might say. From the sources on a question on being exposed to Christmas music at the Judaism Stackexchange, it looks like questions relating to the prohibition of idolatry and worshipping foreign gods may enter into it. This kind of issue can't exactly be reproduced by "turning the tables" because Christianity implicitly recognizes the God of Judaism, but Judaism does not recognize Jesus as God.
Dec
24
comment Is Political Correctness showing shame for our God?
I always wondered why so many people expect to hear 'Merry Christmas' so far in advance of the day, like expecting a "Happy 4th of July" in mid-June. If it's Christmas, say Merry Christmas. If it's Hanukkah, say Happy Hanukkah. But if you have to say something because it's just generally December?
Dec
20
comment Does my monk go to heaven?
You have "The short answer is, according to Scripture, yes." -- but the rest of your post seems to support the answer "no".
Dec
6
awarded  Commentator
Dec
4
comment Are the images we draw of Jesus correct?
Background: Wikipedia on depictions of Jesus and the race and appearance of Jesus
Dec
3
answered What is the difference between being blessed and being happy?
Nov
26
comment Are we born sinners?
The passages you choose are the same as those quoted in my reference -- though also added is Job 14:4: "Who can bring what is pure from the impure? No one!"
Nov
24
comment Is there a basis for Christian holidays in the Bible?
@Muke (On the contrary side, while 'meat offered to idols' may still be meat, it has also still been offered to idols.)
Nov
24
comment Is there a basis for Christian holidays in the Bible?
Of course, being a "pre-Christian pagan tradition" needn't be as bad as it sounds. Certainly some traditions may been pre-Christian and have had a pagan origin, but their being carried over to the Christian holiday suggests that the pagan religious sense was not still felt enough to prevent its being carried over -- the traditions may have passed, so to speak, out of the rites of a religion and into the non-religious customs of a culture. They could have been thought on a par, one could say, with fireworks on the 4th of July or a turkey dinner on Thanksgiving.
Nov
22
comment Career as a Means of Worship
Ecclesiastes 9:7-10, while given in the pessimistic phrasings of that book, does touch on a few of your points.
Nov
19
comment How could Job be content with the second half of his life?
People recover from grief even in cultures without afterlife beliefs... and he lived for 140 years afterwards, which is quite a lot of time to recover from grief and return to contentment with one's life, even without a philosophy that allows one to bear it easily.
Nov
16
comment Significance of Genesis 1 verb choices
Aside from leaving out all the 'said' as Peter mentioned--they are clearly what are called 'performative utterances' here--I should also say that none of the "passives" you mention are actually passive. The passive of 'the land produced vegetation' would be 'vegetation was produced by the land', and I don't believe you can make a passive of 'there was light' or 'it was so' at all. (Maybe 'passive' isn't the word you mean here? You might want to clarify.)