1,241 reputation
68
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Oct 12 '13 at 3:03

I like to split hairs.


Feb
8
revised According to the Bible, do animals have souls?
relevance
Feb
8
comment According to the Bible, do animals have souls?
"Regarding animals, there is no reference to them having a spirit in the bible." - No, Eccl. 3:21 takes as an assumption that animals have spirits (though the sentence itself is an uncertainty about their properties as compared to human spirits).
Feb
8
answered According to the Bible, do animals have souls?
Feb
8
comment Is/will there be time in heaven?
(I was going to say something about the laws of thermodynamics but) Time may be a kind of order, but there may be other kinds of order than Time. A still image may be orderly arranged but doesn't change--doesn't show signs of either temporal order or chaos, as time is taken out of the equation altogether. (I seem to remember C.S. Lewis saying something like this about hell.)
Jan
26
comment How many languages did apostle Paul speak?
Spanish had not yet developed from Latin at the time (Old Spanish is at least 900 years later). In Spain at the time you would have had Latin, maybe Greek, and probably some Phoenician/Punic from the civilizations who'd colonized it, as well as Aquitanian (an ancient relative of Basque), some ancient Celtic languages, and a few other indigenous languages that have not survived.
Jan
26
comment How many languages did apostle Paul speak?
A point against him needing to know Latin is his epistle to the Romans, which was written in Greek. According to 16:22 the person who wrote it for him was called Tertius - which is a Latin name. If Tertius knew Latin and Greek and didn't see the need to translate Romans into Latin, then the Romans it was written to probably didn't mind it being in Greek to begin with. (I understand that educated Romans were expected to know Greek, which was the language of most literature worth reading at the time.)
Jan
12
comment Has the name “Jesus” ever been used for naming Jewish children since the Savior's incarnation?
Note that "Jesus" is the form of the name that's come to us through being translated into Greek. When English borrowed the name directly (though from being applied to a different person) it came out as "Joshua".
Jan
12
comment Is Christmas biblical?
Just a note, there does not appear to be any evidence that Mitra/Mithra/Mithras's birth was commemorated on December 25 (they may have had a holiday then, but not for that purpose).
Jan
12
comment Should a Christian read books known to be heretical / blasphemous / against Christianity?
OT: I think Pullman ruined the anti-Christianity he intended for His Dark Materials when he at some point has the novel say that the person they're calling God isn't actually the Creator--which puts everything in line with the Christian idea of Satan having set himself up as "the god of this world". (But of course this is fiction and 'fictional examples don't prove anything', anyway.)
Jan
12
comment Did the first Christian believers keep the Sabbath and if so on which day?
I'm not sure how the 1 Corinthians quote supports the idea - if I put money in savings on Sunday it doesn't mean I'm observing it religiously. And that he addresses "each of you" suggests he's speaking about something they should do on their own, not in assembly.
Jan
12
comment Who killed Goliath?
Background: Wikipedia on Elhanan, son of Jair
Jan
12
comment Is Christianity with reason wrong?
When the Bible says "faith is [...] the evidence of things not seen" (Hebrews 11:1) it makes a lot of people think it is only that--but you need faith for the outcome of reason and the outcome of observations as well. Even if you do reason and observe, it's still up to you to believe what you have learned is correct, just as much as it's up to you to believe or not believe what is told to you about God by others.
Jan
10
comment How long was it before Adam and Eve sinned?
I think we may also say that it was before Adam and Eve had the opportunity to eat from the tree of life (if eating once from it would enable them to live forever, thus necessitating their immediate banishment from Eden, Gen. 3:22). That doesn't help with a concrete date, but does suggest it may have been sooner rather than later.
Jan
7
comment Does God change?
@sam As an example of change by covenant: in the Noahic covenant God promises never again to destroy the Earth with water (Genesis 9:15)—this is apparently a stated change in Himself, in that He was willing to do so before the covenant, and unwilling to do so after.
Jan
7
comment Does God change?
@sam The Bible shows God entering into covenants with men. If a covenant does not involve a change to act according to that covenant—whether promising to act as one was already acting or promising to act as one did not intend to act—then it is no covenant at all.
Jan
7
comment Does God change?
Agree with @hammar. Perfection doesn't imply inability to change—in fact, inability to change is often (if not always) a flaw in itself. The outside of time argument is better, but as you note yourself, sometimes God puts himself into time (life of Christ, etc.).
Jan
4
comment Does God's omnipresence extend to hell?
I'm not sure that being a spirit is a good argument for omnipresence. The Bible talks about spirits in prison, for example. (And as C.S. Lewis has one of his characters point out: "There's nothing specially fine about simply being a spirit. The Devil is a spirit.")
Jan
3
comment Why does God resort to genocide and destruction?
It may also be that while we can conceive of the possibility of "infinite ways of dealing with these situations", there may be some hidden contradiction that prevents these hypothetical alternatives from being possible at all. Will have to think about that as well.
Jan
3
comment Why does God resort to genocide and destruction?
I still don't have a full answer offhand, though I've been thinking about it. My current idea is also one of the arguments against an eternal Hell: if the miseries of sinful existence continued without being stopped, you have a God who allows an infinite amount of suffering, which we understand to be against his character. (But that idea has its own issues, not the least of which being: why should sinfulness have to lead to suffering at all?)
Jan
2
comment Did God REALLY want to destroy the people of Israel?
@Hammar That there is definitely a whole question to itself! I doubt an answer would fit in a comment (I don't have one offhand) and I don't think it'd be on-topic to address in my answer to this page's question.