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Stack Exchange employs me as a Community Manager. I've been known to respond to jericson@stackexchange.com.

You can read about what I've done over the years in my curriculum vitae.

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Occasionally, I write a post for Eschewmenical.


Apr
24
comment What was Paul's “revelation” (mentioned in Galatians 2:2)?
I see you have an account on Biblical Hermeneutics that you haven't used. This question would be an excellent fit over there if you would be interested in migrating it. (It's a fine question for this site too, but it would reach a different audience over there.)
Apr
24
asked Which of Luther's 95 Theses are still potentially valid critiques of Roman Catholicism?
Apr
24
comment Why do some traditions recite the Lord's Prayer word for word?
Welcome to Christianity--StackExchange! I agree with @ryanOptini--we've had a virtually identical question. Point #2 is a different question, but it's pretty easy to answer with a quick search or a check of a study Bible's cross-references. But you could probably edit the question to get at what you seem to be really asking, which is why some traditions recite the prayer word for word.
Apr
24
answered Did the church fathers or OT talk about the visible and invisible church?
Apr
24
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
I tend to agree. However, I think the broken institutions of the church will be redeemed in the end. Like at the end of The Lord of the Rings when the Fellowship, such as is left of it, receives particular honor. I think in the end, we will recognize whole groups of Christians as worth of special notice apart from their individual faith. Just something to ponder. (+1)
Apr
24
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
@Dani: Well... I believe God has one plan. Here's how it ends: "After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, “Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!”" (Revelation 7:9-10 ESV) (God bless you as well and welcome to Christianity.SE!)
Apr
23
comment What is the Catholic position on ethnic parishes today?
This need not be a solely Catholic question: I'm an active participant in both the English and Spanish services at our local church. Previously, my wife and I were members of a church that folded the Hispanic congregation into the English congregation for many of the same reasons you hint at here. But I can tell you from a purely practical point of view, that's a mistake. People will always chose to worship God in their heart language when they can.
Apr
23
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
Got it: we aren't schismatic since we have never received baptism. (But if I had, I'd still stand with Luther, so I'm not sure it makes much difference in the big picture.)
Apr
23
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
@Thomas: I was thinking: one God == one Church. (But there is also a little puzzle embedded in the way I phrased the question. Your question is a good first step in unraveling it. ;-)
Apr
23
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
For clarification, what does "communion with the members of the Church subject to him" mean? Does it mean that even though I refuse to submit to the Pope, I'm not a schismatic because I'm willing to interact (even learn) from those who are? Was Luther a schismatic? (Thanks for the answer, by the way. I really wasn't aware of this point (or virtually any other) of canon law.)
Apr
23
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
@Rex: Yes, that's true. Personally, I believe there is a good purpose for everything: "And we know that for those who love God all things work together for good, for those who are called according to his purpose." (Romans 8:28 ESV) That includes sickness, sin, and schism. (I hold a version of felix culpa theology, but I suppose denying that would make a reasonable answer too.)
Apr
23
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
@zipquincy: You have the kernel of a good answer there. I would point out that the primary difference between a club and a clique is that one is focused on a particular function or purpose, and the other is focused on self-preservation. (That's where my answer would start.)
Apr
23
asked How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
Apr
18
comment The Christology of Dietrich Bonhoeffer
Thumbnail answer: Yes, he was influenced by Barth. He also wrote a Christological treatise called Christ the Center, which is excellent and orthodox as far as I can tell. Bonhoeffer's theology has come under attack in some circles because of personal letters written in prison that were published minus some relevant context. (When I dig out my copy of the book, I may attempt a real answer.)
Apr
17
comment How should a Christian feel inside?
May I be the first to welcome you to Christianity--StackExchange. Thank you for the very comprehensive answer. I completely agree with your conclusions and you've done a lot of work to back them up with Scripture. +1 (One "complaint" I have is that the variety of verses you quote, each with their own context, break up the flow of the answer to a degree where I just skipped them. Maybe it would be profitable to just list chapter and verse in a parenthetical and skip the quoted text.)
Apr
17
comment Can indirection bring us closer to Christ?
Now you're speaking my language! But it's a two-edged sword, isn't it? On the one hand, the Spirit does redirect the Ghost to himself as God's representative, but on the other, he had to do that as the Ghost had made on idol of theology. He had (and I am well acquainted with the problem) substituted academic belief for actual belief. And further, the Spirit was a close friend in whom the Ghost could be expected to trust. And the goal would be to rid oneself of the intermediary when the real thing can be obtained directly, right?
Apr
17
comment Can indirection bring us closer to Christ?
Thanks for taking the time: it's fun to read and think about, and its usefulness is directly proportional to the usefulness of Marian consecration itself. I would love to hear more of your experience 9 years ago (though this might not be the ideal place for that). I'm not sure I ever took notice of Luke 2:33-5. But isn't it Jesus' heart that is being referred to in the quote in the question? You've (once again) given me a lot to think about.
Apr
16
comment What was the debate at the Reformation concerning “non extra carnem” vs. “extra calvinisticum”?
Thanks for the update. (This isn't the easiest question to answer, I'd say. ;-)
Apr
16
comment What's the deal with oil?
@Thomas: Being greedy for questions on BH, I'm not the right person to ask. However, I don't see a lot about this question that is particularly Christianity-related; lots of ancient cultures used oil for anointing.
Apr
16
comment Can indirection bring us closer to Christ?
@Marc: I was thinking of something along the lines of K&R section 5.6 where a qsort of variable length character arrays is best solved with an array of pointers. (I suppose this optimization has been built into the abstraction of most higher level languages.)