889 reputation
2823
bio website
location Sweden
age 25
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Nov 18 at 9:27

I've got a bachelor's degree in Computer Science and Engineering and am employed as a software developer, working mainly with Android and apps. I have a wide range of interests, with computing and linguistics being the greatest.


Nov
3
asked “Those excluded from the Congregation”
Nov
3
revised What is the Biblical evidence against the perpetual virginity of Mary?
I removed some of mine own conclusions and added some clarifying text to let the reader make their own decision.
Nov
3
comment What is the Biblical evidence against the perpetual virginity of Mary?
I'd be happy if you edited my answer to the better. I shall read through it again and see if I can enhance it. And in the same way as you wrote your question, I wrote this answer not just for the benefit of the questioner but for the benefit of those who read the answer. I did not direct this answer to you alone (the "you"s in my answer is not referring to you, but to the reader).
Nov
3
answered What is the Biblical evidence against the perpetual virginity of Mary?
Nov
3
comment Honor and solidarity
"As for solidarity with friends and relatives, the Bible (the New Testament) explicitly says it is forbidden to favour your friends and relatives over other people." Where does it explicitly say so?
Nov
3
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Yes, I had the entire context in mind when writing the question. My question is not how the RCC reconciles the usage of the word "father" with these verses. I personally think that even if a particular priest, abbot or pope is humble, these titles are inviting people to be proud. But I get what you and the others say and maybe this prohibition is about people that are not deserving of the title and that there are some people that really are deserving of the title. But even if that is the case, I think it would be better to not use them at all to avoid pride as much as possible.
Nov
2
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@JamesBlack I don't really get what you mean with: "even though that word was a translation". The particular word doesn't matter. Also, if this was a prohibition to call my earthly father "father", then it would not have any significance to call my heavenly father "father". Calling my heavenly father "father" reminds me that he is my father, like my earthly father and that our relation is meant to be close and intimate, like the relationship between father and son.
Nov
1
accepted What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
The verse from 1 Corinthians is the only one that might convince me. The verses about Abraham (and Isaac) could support your point, but since Paul was a jew, he might have referred to Abraham as his forefather (many times the Bible makes no difference between "father" and "forefather"). In the following I interpret "fathers" as fathers or elder men in general, not the author's own fathers. And Matthew 19:18-19 is obviously referring to our earthly fathers. Still, you answer my question with the Catholic explanation for this, so I accept your answer.
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@JamesBlack Obviously, Jesus is not talking about our earthly fathers, that would just be silly.
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@PeterTurner Just coincidence. Interesting. ^^
Oct
31
asked What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Oct
31
awarded  Quorum
Oct
19
accepted If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Oct
19
comment If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Interesting theories. I think the third make most sense to me, at least that part about 120 years being an average and not a definite maximum. Would it be possible for you to give some examples for the "several people recorded in the Bible that have lived longer than 120 years since then"?
Oct
17
revised If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
deleted 59 characters in body
Oct
17
asked If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Oct
11
awarded  Editor
Oct
11
revised Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?
Added Rahab
Oct
11
comment Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?
@Jay I think that Melchizedek is a quite good example here. He is a priest of God before there even were priests of God. It is not a good example in the sense that it shows how someone could get saved, however, it is good in the sense that someone could get saved even without Israel.