Reputation
986
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
See votes, expandable usercard
Badges
4 10 24
Impact
~139k people reached

Nov
4
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
As Jesus stated: yes. There's to much potential pride involved. If someone looks at you and call you some of those titles and you accept it, you will soon look at yourself as that title, which is a huge risk for pride. Jesus told us to humble ourselves and he even told us not to let other people exalt us. I don't think there's any great need for those titles and God already fulfills all of them. We don't need bishops and priests: The Holy Spirit is our teacher, instructor and doctor, the Father is our father and the Son is our savior.
Nov
3
comment “Those excluded from the Congregation”
I just posted a question on Biblical Hermeneutics referring to the same passage, asking about the meaning of "the assembly of the LORD".
Nov
3
comment “Those excluded from the Congregation”
@Richard Okay, you're right. Protestantism it is.
Nov
3
comment “Those excluded from the Congregation”
As you say, the commandments that God gave in Deuteronomy was meant for a specific context. That's why I think that i's especially important to understand the meaning and purpose of the commandments so that we can find some applicable general principle (if any). Therefore, I'm asking if there is any general principle in this one and if we can apply that particular principle in our own lives and congregations today. Perhaps I should extend my question.
Nov
3
comment “Those excluded from the Congregation”
@Richard My purpose is not to know how different denominations view this passage, but to get as good an answer as possible. Also, I do not (wish to) disqualify answers based on any particular doctrinal stance, but if I have to choose one I choose protestantism.
Nov
3
asked “Those excluded from the Congregation”
Nov
3
comment Honor and solidarity
"As for solidarity with friends and relatives, the Bible (the New Testament) explicitly says it is forbidden to favour your friends and relatives over other people." Where does it explicitly say so?
Nov
3
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Yes, I had the entire context in mind when writing the question. My question is not how the RCC reconciles the usage of the word "father" with these verses. I personally think that even if a particular priest, abbot or pope is humble, these titles are inviting people to be proud. But I get what you and the others say and maybe this prohibition is about people that are not deserving of the title and that there are some people that really are deserving of the title. But even if that is the case, I think it would be better to not use them at all to avoid pride as much as possible.
Nov
2
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@JamesBlack I don't really get what you mean with: "even though that word was a translation". The particular word doesn't matter. Also, if this was a prohibition to call my earthly father "father", then it would not have any significance to call my heavenly father "father". Calling my heavenly father "father" reminds me that he is my father, like my earthly father and that our relation is meant to be close and intimate, like the relationship between father and son.
Nov
1
accepted What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
The verse from 1 Corinthians is the only one that might convince me. The verses about Abraham (and Isaac) could support your point, but since Paul was a jew, he might have referred to Abraham as his forefather (many times the Bible makes no difference between "father" and "forefather"). In the following I interpret "fathers" as fathers or elder men in general, not the author's own fathers. And Matthew 19:18-19 is obviously referring to our earthly fathers. Still, you answer my question with the Catholic explanation for this, so I accept your answer.
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@JamesBlack Obviously, Jesus is not talking about our earthly fathers, that would just be silly.
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@PeterTurner Just coincidence. Interesting. ^^
Oct
31
asked What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Oct
31
awarded  Quorum
Oct
19
accepted If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Oct
19
comment If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Interesting theories. I think the third make most sense to me, at least that part about 120 years being an average and not a definite maximum. Would it be possible for you to give some examples for the "several people recorded in the Bible that have lived longer than 120 years since then"?
Oct
17
revised If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
deleted 59 characters in body
Oct
17
asked If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Oct
11
awarded  Editor