814 reputation
1718
bio website
location Sweden
age 24
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Apr 3 at 11:20

I've got a bachelor's degree in Computer Science and Engineering and am employed as a software developer, working mainly with Android and apps. I have a wide range of interests, with computing and linguistics being the greatest.


Nov
1
accepted What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
The verse from 1 Corinthians is the only one that might convince me. The verses about Abraham (and Isaac) could support your point, but since Paul was a jew, he might have referred to Abraham as his forefather (many times the Bible makes no difference between "father" and "forefather"). In the following I interpret "fathers" as fathers or elder men in general, not the author's own fathers. And Matthew 19:18-19 is obviously referring to our earthly fathers. Still, you answer my question with the Catholic explanation for this, so I accept your answer.
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@JamesBlack Obviously, Jesus is not talking about our earthly fathers, that would just be silly.
Nov
1
comment What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
@PeterTurner Just coincidence. Interesting. ^^
Oct
31
asked What is the Roman Catholic view on Matthew 23:9?
Oct
31
awarded  Quorum
Oct
19
accepted If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Oct
19
comment If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Interesting theories. I think the third make most sense to me, at least that part about 120 years being an average and not a definite maximum. Would it be possible for you to give some examples for the "several people recorded in the Bible that have lived longer than 120 years since then"?
Oct
17
revised If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
deleted 59 characters in body
Oct
17
asked If God set the maximum age to 120, then how could Jacob be 130 years old?
Oct
11
awarded  Editor
Oct
11
revised Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?
Added Rahab
Oct
11
comment Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?
@Jay I think that Melchizedek is a quite good example here. He is a priest of God before there even were priests of God. It is not a good example in the sense that it shows how someone could get saved, however, it is good in the sense that someone could get saved even without Israel.
Oct
11
comment Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?
@MasonWheeler Okay that one's new to me. There's a lot of theories about Melchizedek. The reason why I don't really participate in that discussion is that it is too little to know and too much to speculate about.
Oct
10
awarded  Scholar
Oct
10
accepted Did Satan really not understand God's salvation plan?
Oct
10
awarded  Commentator
Oct
10
comment What about those who lived before Christ long outside the reach of Israel?
Therefore, I think that this question is not really the same thing as the other three that you've linked. The fourth question is the same as this question though, but from a slightly different perspective and much better put, so there's no reason to open up this question again.
Oct
10
comment What about those who lived before Christ long outside the reach of Israel?
Of course, every people on earth gets saved through Jesus, but what I am thinking about is how this got to be for those who lived outside the reach of Israel at that time. Those who lived in Israel were supposed to believe in and to lean on God and to trust that he would save them, and I think that the surrounding peoples were supposed to see and embrace that. But how could the peoples who had no possibility to hear about Israel get saved?
Oct
10
comment What about those who lived before Christ long outside the reach of Israel?
Okay, I get you. The exact topic is close to, but not the same as, the other questions. It is about what God could have as a plan for salvation for those who lived before the time of Christ and long away from Israel. It might be the same as for those who have not heard the gospel (and live/lived either before or after Christ), but it might also not be the same. As you can read in my answer to the question about how non-hebrews got saved before Christ, I think think that the main way to get saved then was to hear about Gods work and believe in him.