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Sep
6
comment Mental Illness vs. Demon Possession
@RedRackham - Since my second category seems to be the modern perspective of at least a decent selection of Orthodox churches, I've updated the links to indicate as much.
Sep
6
comment Mental Illness vs. Demon Possession
@Nathaniel - I have cleaned up the Orthodox section with references to modern Orthodox churches talking about demonic possession in a way consistent with my characterization of the viewpoint.
Sep
4
comment Mental Illness vs. Demon Possession
@Nathaniel - Do you mean "Biblical Literalist"? I do not think that edit is accurate otherwise, as it makes it sound like other perspectives are non-Biblical.
Sep
4
comment Mental Illness vs. Demon Possession
@RedRackham - Well, no one group can lay complete claim to the title "Orthodox"; it really does mean the historical views: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orthodox_Christianity So no modern individual can, without further qualifications, precisely qualify as orthodox because they most likely have additional modern beliefs (e.g. Eastern Orthodox).
Aug
30
comment Mental Illness vs. Demon Possession
@RedRackham - I used Yulish as one example out of many possibilities. I brought up Catholicism because they recognize at least some cases of demonic possession, and in the link I posted explain how they think they know they're correct. Also, I mean "orthodox" in the general sense of it being the historical interpretation; I didn't have any particular modern group labeled "orthodox" in mind (e.g. Greek, Russian, etc.)".
Aug
23
comment Mental Illness vs. Demon Possession
@RedRackham - My "sources" for these perspectives are conversations with people who believed each, plus various things I read over the years. The Catholic Church takes a "diversification perspective" (see e.g. knowledgenuts.com/2014/01/31/…) regarding modern cases; I'm not sure how Catholics interpret Matthew 8:28-9, but a literal reading seems likely to me. How do you know which is correct? Depends on your epistemology. E.g. if validation and evidence is primary, you'll take the medical perspective.
Sep
15
comment What is the interpretation of the bow in the cloud after the Flood?
That is very strange reasoning since (1) there hasn't been time since the ark for wood to petrify, (2) lots of petrified wood does have tree rings clearly visible, and (3) the identification of the ark is highly controversial. (I assume you accept that the ice answer is mechanically impossible, sans divine intervention of a level that would equally well enable a layer of water, clouds, nothing, etc..)
Sep
2
comment What is the interpretation of the bow in the cloud after the Flood?
Without scriptural support for ice specifically, why assume it when it has so many physical problems (e.g. it would be shattered by tidal forces)? Also, 8:22 doesn't look like a list of new phenomena; Genesis 7:4 is pretty clear about there already being day and night. Overall the answer looks reasonably clever but I'm not so sure the scriptural support is good.
Dec
5
comment Mental Illness vs. Demon Possession
@GregMcNulty - Well, that was the first link I found. Maybe there are others that proponents of that viewpoint would like better.
May
7
comment Does the Bible give us any indication of why God created such a vast universe with so much stuff in it?
The passages may, if viewed in a certain light, but your answer doesn't cast them in that light. Point 2 in your comment helps a bit.
May
7
comment Does the Bible give us any indication of why God created such a vast universe with so much stuff in it?
I don't want everything explained, just the stupefying vastness of it all. That the universe is so incredibly vast is the key point that makes this question interesting/novel. Otherwise it's just a generic "why isn't everything small and boring" question.
May
7
comment Does the Bible give us any indication of why God created such a vast universe with so much stuff in it?
Maybe the poster didn't notice what they asked, but they mentioned 29 gigaparsecs wide and specifically wanted justification for it being "so enormous". The scale of enormity of the actual universe is mindbogglingly bigger than the enormity required for any of your answers. Thus it's not a good answer to what the poster asked, even if the poster is happy with it.
May
7
comment Does the Bible give us any indication of why God created such a vast universe with so much stuff in it?
Interesting idea, but the energetics of spreading an exponentially expanding population across interstellar distances is dubious at best. You have to get your population under control first (unless, I suppose, you are divinely inspired as to how to create fusion reactors and near-light-speed drives, without instruction or research).
May
7
comment Does the Bible give us any indication of why God created such a vast universe with so much stuff in it?
A galaxy would have more than sufficed for everything listed here. Even a globular cluster would have more than sufficed! So this doesn't actually answer the question.
Nov
23
comment Christian view of why there are so many similarities between Quran and Bible?
Let's not get into historical bloodshed by followers of a religion as a metric by which to judge that religion. Though interesting historically, it's irrelevant to whether it is heresy, just as it is irrelevant to the truth of Christianity that Pizarro and Cortez were nominally promoting Christianity when they conquered the Incan and Aztec empires respectively.
Oct
10
comment What is the interpretation of the bow in the cloud after the Flood?
Are you suggesting that the Milky Way--that is, the rest of our galaxy--didn't exist (or its light could not be seen) until after the Flood? Or do you also take the it-was-always-there-but-this-is-what-it-means interpretation?
Oct
3
comment What could persuade a presumably otherwise-rational Satan to turn on God?
@RiverC - There is no logical necessity for hierarchy, nor any evidence that it is fundamental or atomic or anything. It is highly prevalent, of course, and it is an effective organizational structure, and a complete lack of hierarchy might be incredibly boring, but let's not elevate it beyond what it deserves. In particular, there is no logical problem with postulating angels with exactly identical singing abilities (or with all abilities identical). Dull, and not fitting God's plan, perhaps, but not impossible--and hence it is not trivial to dismiss the question "why?".
Sep
22
comment Why are we not seeing miracles in our lives?
Note that even for an engineer, ad-hoc probability estimates are not that reliable because (1) it's hard to remember how big the denominator is--you experience millions of events, so you expect a few "million-to-one" occurrences just by chance, and (2) it's easy to overestimate how improbable something is when you didn't anticipate it.
Jul
23
comment Why has God never spoken to me?
@jmn - You're a social primate--and postulating that you're a result of a long evolutionary process--and you think you shouldn't be nice to other humans?! People routinely report that the most rewarding things in life--those things that impart a feeling of meaning--include raising children and being part of a strong community. Pretty reasonable for social primates (evolved or otherwise). You have plenty of social duties and related goals, God or no.
Apr
26
comment How could a loving, just, merciful God have created such an unfair test for humans?
@RiverC - That definitely helps. I'm not sure it would convince those from other denominations (or impartial observers), but it does make clear the perspective and shows how the view has some scriptural support (though you will admit, I think, that it is not exceedingly clear).