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seen Sep 11 at 10:14

Jul
31
comment From whom does faith come?
Running the risk of the moderators kicking us over to chat for extended commenting.... Perhaps synthetic theology doesn't mean what I thought it meant. Actually, I know of a good forum to ask such a question! As far as interpretation being informed by doctrine... I see your point. We're certainly influenced by it, but it begs the question on where your systematics comes from. I argue that it should be biblically based itself, whence arises the question "is there scriptural support for regeneration preceding conversion", which may bring us right back where we started!
Jul
31
revised From whom does faith come?
added 11 characters in body
Jul
31
comment From whom does faith come?
Actually, I shouldn't say yes and no. It does answer it... it's just not the answer I was hoping for :). But I appreciate your commitment to what the scripture is intending, and not trying to read into it something just to support your position.
Jul
31
comment From whom does faith come?
Yes and no. Actually, the thing I liked about your answer is that it's the only one citing scriptural evidence rather than just theological positions. But it sounds from your comment that you need the synthetics to inform your position.
Jul
31
revised From whom does faith come?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jul
31
comment From whom does faith come?
Also, I hope you don't mind my edits... I'm just a little OCD with separating out the quotations--it just makes it easier for me to read. Feel free to reverse my edit if you disagree.
Jul
31
comment From whom does faith come?
Adrian, +1 and thanks for the response--I'm most interested in the Ephesians passage. I assume your position is that the "it" refers to faith, right? I can see this also explained as though "it" refers to salvation, i.e., "...salvation is the gift of God, not a result of works..." Would you consider expanding on that?
Jul
31
revised From whom does faith come?
added formatting to set apart the scriptural quotations
Jul
30
asked From whom does faith come?
Jul
30
comment Did the cross permanently affect the intra-trinitarian relationship?
That's a good counter-argument. It seems like sound reasoning that it would contradict immutability (which is not without scriptural support itself), but I could potentially be convinced either way. It might be useful if you could expand on that to counter Affable Geek's position.
Jul
30
asked Did the cross permanently affect the intra-trinitarian relationship?
Jul
17
comment How do we know that Jesus was crucified at 9:00 a.m.?
Either way, if dawn was at 8:39 AM, surely the third hour wouldn't be only 41 minutes later?!
Jul
17
comment How do we know that Jesus was crucified at 9:00 a.m.?
If you're referring to the idea that you divide the duration of daylight in 12, on that date (assuming the traditional year of 33 AD, it would be April 1), it was 12 hours and 40 minutes of daylight. 760 / 12 is about 63 minutes per hour. So 3 hours after sunrise would be 11:48.
Jul
17
comment How do we know that Jesus was crucified at 9:00 a.m.?
Can you explain what you mean by absolute vs relative hours? I thought it meant 3 hours after sunrise?
Jul
16
comment How do we know that Jesus was crucified at 9:00 a.m.?
Passover 33 AD fell on Friday, April 1. Sunrise that day was 8:39 in Jerusalem. 3 hours later is 11:39 AM.
Jun
26
comment Why do OEC discount the literal interpretation of the book of Genesis?
@mojo, it might be useful to have this discussion over at hermeneutics.stackexchange.com
Jun
21
comment Does being a Christian mean being a Bible literalist?
Perhaps not literally, but I see his point. It doesn't just say "In the beginning was Jesus, and Jesus was with God, and Jesus was God"--John in being intentional with his imagery here and we shouldn't be too quick to dismiss it. Again; not to say that God is the Bible, but that He identifies his self-expression with himself.
May
13
revised Does New Testament accounting language have any Old Testament backing?
"forgiveness" is not always financial language
May
13
comment Does New Testament accounting language have any Old Testament backing?
That's a good point. Forgive is translated primary from two words, ἀφίημι and χαρίζομαι; the latter being financial language, and the former not. It looks like where "forgive" and "sins" are connected, it is ἀφίημι. I'm removing that section of the question.
May
13
asked Does New Testament accounting language have any Old Testament backing?