829 reputation
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age 35
visits member for 3 years
seen Jul 28 at 14:19

i am a nonbeliever, though i grew up in a fundamentalist christian home. i live in a very religious part of the US, and most of my peeps are christians. and the psych, anthropology, history and politics of christianity & other religions are super fascinating. so i need to continue to learn about this stuff...


Aug
5
comment Why does Catholicism have priests but Protestantism does not?
No need to call people liers, that's not how this site works. Info only, not judgement
Aug
1
comment What reasons does Christianity give for “Why There Must Be A God?”
@degausser - painful as it is, your families issues with your non-belief have very little to do with whether you should believe - that should be based on whether you find evidence or reason on your own.
Jul
29
comment In which country is the Garden of Eden located?
3. The new rivers were named for older rivers 4. This is made up
Jun
6
comment Christian significance of Tolkien and CS Lewis putting “heaven” across the sea?
TRiG - I've been reading the Chronicles of Narnia to my daughters over the past year, and they seem very consistent to me. As well as extremely beautiful. God should have had CS Lewis write the Bible.
May
2
comment How is it that an unchanging and omniscient God can have “regret” as He did in Gen 6:7?
he can't be completely unlike us if we were made in his image.
Apr
24
comment How is it that an unchanging and omniscient God can have “regret” as He did in Gen 6:7?
@warren - well, this is why people arguing I should believe in God because he's behind everything that's good and beautiful sound ridiculous. God sounds like an *** to me.
Apr
23
comment By what mechanism could the Bible be inerrant?
What was the point of doing that if we were allowed to create so many bad translations (e.g. some translations of Deuteronomy 22) and to confuse and disagree with so many details? To me this is like God produced an HD, 3D video of THE TRUTH and then released it to 1st generation Youtube quality. If he really wanted to send an inerrant message then why put it out into such a low fidelity, poorly transmitted medium?
Apr
23
comment Are there any studies on why some doubters quit faith and others double-down on it?
@DoubtingThomas you may be right.
Apr
23
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
@Jon, thanks -- if anybody wants to take the core of my answer and run with it, I'm cool with that. Since I dont believe in a monotheistic God, I feel like its not appropriate for me to give a real answer :)
Apr
23
comment Are there any studies on why some doubters quit faith and others double-down on it?
To answer "Well, God works in peoples hearts" or something like that is probably not a good answer -- I want to know what Humans have learned about such phase changes in belief
Apr
23
comment How do schisms in the church fit into the plans of a monotheistic God?
The cliques in a HighSchool divide students into competing groups that look down on each other, and often have negative outcomes. The clubs in a highschool though give everyone a place to thrive based on their natural skills, histories and perspectives. I think God would want different Churches to be more like clubs in this respect, but humans go cliqueish anyway. Worth noting: I'm an athiest, but this is how I see many types of exclusive groups -- when divisions are used to help diverse individuals to grow, that's good; when they cause fights and holier-than-though attitudes thats bad
Apr
23
comment How is it that an unchanging and omniscient God can have “regret” as He did in Gen 6:7?
@warren - how is it Just to execute nearly every human being alive, including the kids, no matter what their sins? thats what seems unhealthy to me
Nov
29
comment Significance of virgins in the Catholic church
+1 for "1st grade". My question was maybe a 4th grade question, but anyway... :)
Nov
29
comment Significance of virgins in the Catholic church
"female saints who took vows be a spouse of Christ" - is there any sort of church endorsement of polygamy in this concept? i mean if we are supposed to be like christ and christ has multiple "spouses", well, should i take multiple wives? i know the answer is "no, there isn't" but it is interesting to think about -- why isn't this idea an endorsement of polygamy? i know in protestantism there is the idea that the church as a whole is christ's spouse, but i hadn't heard of it at an individual level...
Nov
15
comment Virgin birth in other religions and relevance to Christianity
@Richard - actually, based on my participation in other SE sites, I have to agree with you. i understand why they designed it that way, but it seems to cause problems... peace
Nov
15
comment Virgin birth in other religions and relevance to Christianity
@Richard - ok, I get your position here. However, this attitude is a huge part of why I had to walk away from Christian faith -- Christian truth as a completely closed system... If it's not in the Bible or codified in some church's official doctrine, then it's not a relavent piece of information to a Christian worldview... sorry, but to me that just seems so backwards.
Nov
15
comment Virgin birth in other religions and relevance to Christianity
@Richard - if the answer is "there is no relevance" that must still be on topic. I specifically phrased the question from the POV of what a Christian might make of this. How is this more off topic than the Flood question for instance? And I specifically phrased it not as "what can Christians learn from those faiths" but instead "what can Christians learn from the fact those faiths believe similar things" which is a pretty different concept... I dispute this close as off topic.
Nov
15
comment Virgin birth in other religions and relevance to Christianity
@PeterTurner - ok, I think the terminology confusion is mine, sorry. it's been a long time since I spoke of this stuff... but that's why I'm on this site, to learn. thanks
Nov
15
comment Virgin birth in other religions and relevance to Christianity
@Peter - what is a better way to phrase this and specifically refer to the mechanism of incarnation? Maybe my terminology is wrong but incarnation is too general, of that much I am sure.
Nov
15
comment Virgin birth in other religions and relevance to Christianity
I notice an edit changing my "immaculate conception" in the second paragraph to "incarnation". But I specifically mean to refer to the fact Jesus became incarnated by growing in a human womb but without involving human sex-- not the general fact he was incarnated. As "incarnation" more generally refers to divine inhabiting human flesh, that is too general because it excludes the mechanism.