667 reputation
715
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years
seen Aug 12 at 5:04

13h
awarded  Yearling
Jun
2
comment Are faith and proof mutually exclusive?
@Steve I feel that when it comes to definitions, in the end, the usage is what matters. If people start using "banana" to refer to a cat, then eventually the definition of "banana" is one of those furry sharp toothed things. I do think if you did a thorough study of the usage of the religious meaning of "faith" in the last 2000 years, it just doesn't match well to the idea of proof in the way I defined it above. Which is fine, because that is part of Christianity, as the quote from Paul I gave shows--Christianity does ask the believer to believe things unseen.
May
31
comment Are faith and proof mutually exclusive?
@curiousdannii Please note my prefatory clause: "When regarding religious matters". I made sure to put that to distinguish it between other uses of the word "faith". Religious faith is generally used to mean believing in something despite having no evidence (in the way I defined it above) for it. A good example is from Hebrews 11:1: "Now faith is confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see."
Apr
12
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
17
awarded  Good Question
Mar
2
comment What is the doctrine of the Trinity?
Could a reasonable earthly equivalent be a company that has one president, but there are three persons who have that title? And let's say that they were always in agreement on every decision.
Feb
4
comment Is there a Christian equivalent to the Wiccan 'fluffy bunnies'?
There is also the "A&P" Catholics, where A and P stand for Ashes and Palms, those who just show up for Ash Wednesday and Palm Sunday. Source: EWTN's Fr. Andrew Apostoli.
Jan
28
comment Where did Noah find polar bears and penguins in Palestine?
@Jeff I don't think so; look at the front page--the most recent questions--and tell me if most of those are answered sensibly by, "Because God says so.". For example: "What do Christians mean by a 'personal relationship' with Jesus?". Etc. But yes, for quite a few of the questions, I understand how my answer could be seen as incurious.
Oct
25
comment Why did God create man with an evil nature?
Indeed, a related question might be: if it is possible for God to create people with free will who would never choose evil and have them be with Him in Heaven...why would he ever place them somewhere other than Heaven?
Sep
5
comment Can you go to heaven if you believe in the wrong God or Religion?
I agree with the other commenters, but just want to emphasize generalizing this to talk to good other people. Maybe start right in your own family, if you can. Then good friends, teachers, coaches, school counselor, etc. We're all in this together, and although certainly death is not a happy topic, many people have come to a peace about it in their own way. Good luck!
Sep
1
awarded  Yearling
Aug
6
accepted How many Bibles--not translations--are there?
Aug
6
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
27
comment Blue plate special as metaphor for the Trinity
But then you would have to say the the length is the cube, the height is the cube, and the width is the cube, and that is not true.
Jul
25
comment Which kind of relations are considered incestous in Christianity?
@Caleb OK, "extremely" common is too strong, esp. for the U.S. I don't know the frequency in traditional societies, but I would bet it is at least "not that uncommon" (several in a high school, say) if you average world-wide. The reasons for this in small societies make sense, no?
Jul
24
comment Which kind of relations are considered incestous in Christianity?
Why should it weird anyone out? I'm sure it has been and is an extremely common pattern in the world, and for obvious reasons (similar ages, a means to play matchmaker within two good families, even similar tastes in partners).
Jul
23
comment What is the basis for why certain musical beats are deemed by some to be unchristian or immoral?
@Narnian Yes, I considered that, but I feel that 4/4 is so incredibly dominant at this point that 3/4 probably represents less than (guessing) 1% of all music listening events each day, so I figured it was safe to use "almost all". (This is not my preference; I love odd time signatures)
Jul
23
comment What is the basis for why certain musical beats are deemed by some to be unchristian or immoral?
It's not the beat, since almost all Western music is in a 4/4 beat, and that includes gospel and traditional European and American church hymns and related songs. (Notably, Gregorian chant has no beat!). It's more about the instrumentation (blaring electric guitars), the lyrics, the leather, the hair, the fans... There is also the devil's interval (the tritone) that just plain sounds "evil". Just to put some musical expansion into your thoughts...
Jul
23
comment What is so appealing about Christianity?
The problem I have with this idea that "it was appealing because it was truth" is that there are many counterexamples in history in which (arguably) falsehoods were popular and/or truths were not. Another way of saying this is, just because it is true doesn't mean that it will be appealing/popular. For examples: you believe that Buddhists (~350 million) and Muslims (~1.6 billion) believe something that is false.
Jul
22
comment What is so appealing about Christianity?
I wonder whether sociological or "social criticism" style analysis of Christianity is welcome on this site. It certainly could provide knowledge about Christianity as a human phenomenon, and I would think it ought to exist in this knowledge-base.