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Jan
7
awarded  Notable Question
Oct
16
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
26
answered Did Jonah fail the test of a prophet?
Dec
21
revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
21
revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
21
revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
21
revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
21
revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
21
revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
21
revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
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revised Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
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Dec
21
answered Were the Jews expecting God Incarnate?
Dec
20
comment What is the Christian definition of “The Messiah”?
I do not think people were awaiting a person who got his hair smeared with oil. Everyone can get their hair smeared with oil. They were awaiting someone who would fulfill some expectations - and the oil ceremony was just a formal ritual to symbolize his being the one who would soon fulfill those expectations. You are dwelling on the oil matter, which is just the Hebrew etymology of the term, but not its essence. If reading the NT could solve those questions, there would not be over 40,000 Christian denominations. Please don't beat around the bush.
Dec
20
comment What is the Christian definition of “The Messiah”?
I'm sure modern-day Christians say "The NT is authoritative since the 1st century people who (presumably) wrote it knew what they were talking about. They were awaiting the messiah, and they were convinced Jesus was the messiah. He wasn't just a manipulator. He really fit the bill for them. He matched a fair amount of their expectations." So what messiah did those 1st century followers expect that was largely, or to some extent at least - met in Jesus?
Dec
19
comment What is the Christian definition of “The Messiah”?
"by what he says and the way he looks and moves, even if he doesn't precisely match my earlier expectation." But he did match most of your earlier expectations, or some of them, at least? Otherwise why wouldn't you accept as your uncle the salesman that knocked on your door 5 minutes earlier? If so, then list in your answer those main pre-Jesus expectations that did match when Jesus came along. No need to provide the whole list of "fulfilled expectations" that apologists like to brag about - I don't believe that the average convert in the 1st millennium ever knew about most of them
Dec
19
comment What is the Christian definition of “The Messiah”?
You are confusing between the etymology and the essence. I don't think the oil is the main thing about being "the messiah" - although the word means "anointed one". It's like saying, the President of the USA is the person who gets to make a speech during the inauguration ceremony - the speech is a symbol, not the essence. Traditionally, Jews were awaiting a King to deliver them from occupation, they were not awaiting a guy who got his hair smeared with oil, since that alone is useless. Oil is just a symbol of being chosen to do the job. But what is the (1st coming) job according to Christians?
Dec
19
comment What is the Christian definition of “The Messiah”?
David, I have no problem to accept the Christian definition as such. I'm just not sure what it is. I read in James T's reply that it's "axiomatic" (which I understand to mean "automatically resulting from of him being a sin cleanser"). He also says (if I get him right) that Christians don't need Jesus to follow any criteria for him to be called messiah. From this I conclude, for them it's just an honorary title, with no "real meaning" such as "a person who accomplished A, B, C...". If I am wrong, I would like to ask James T to make his answer clearer.
Dec
19
comment What is the Christian definition of “The Messiah”?
Much of what you wrote does not refer to my question, except for the last paragraph. To paraphrase you: "The Messiah" means to Christians something like "the most adorable one" (and it doesn't alarm them to use it that way since they rarely know its original Hebrew meaning). Christians admire Jesus for other reasons - they believe he atones for their sins. For doing that, they also call him "The Messiah", i.e. "the most adorable one". I truly see most Christians use it like that. They don't regard it as a title that requires qualification by itself - just as a title that shows their admiration
Dec
19
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