2,168 reputation
941
bio website goran12.rajce.idnes.cz
location Czech Republic
age 29
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen May 7 at 7:14

From professional point of view, I'm an eternal student - I have already finished a master in Archaeology and now I study bachelor degree GIS - the computer part of everything needed to be an expert on Computer Aplications in Archaeology.

From spiritual point of view, I'm a young child in Christ (converted on Easter 2010, baptised a year later), a pilgrim to Santiago de Compostela (I have been there once and I hope it wasn't the last time), a Catholic and a member of Light-Life Movement.

And about hobbies, I'm a RPG enthusiast and I like hiking and everything I've already mentioned.

Here on SE, I've found a nice place to talk about Christianity and a source of information for my job. As a Czech patriot, I also hope my language will find its place here.


Mar
16
revised At what age should Christians be confirmed according to St. Thomas Aquinas?
added 58 characters in body
Mar
16
asked At what age should Christians be confirmed according to St. Thomas Aquinas?
Mar
16
comment How should Christians meditate?
This is one (perhaps slightly simplified) form of lectio divina, the "original" or "most classical" Christian meditation. Btw. word "meditation" is derived from the latin word meaning "between" (reading Bible).
Mar
16
comment Can a Roman Catholic be re-catechized and re-confirmed?
There are movements focused on deeper "recatechization" of those who already were cathechized, but didn't exploit this catechization to its fullness, such Neocatechumenate or Light-Life Movement. Their program can be taken parallel to (not instead of, AFAIK) the classical catechisation - for example I started the Light-Life Movement's program as a catechumen.
Feb
24
reviewed Reviewed How does free will fit with the doctrine of predestination?
Feb
24
comment How does free will fit with the doctrine of predestination?
Welcome here! As Mawia commented, this doesn't really answer the question and doesn't really help. However, don't feel ashamed or afraid to ask/answer another question - just make sure the answers really answers the question, from the viewpoint of the denomination specified in the question or by its tags, if any. See tour for details.
Feb
14
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
23
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
17
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
30
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
13
awarded  Yearling
Sep
2
comment Why did Protestants abandon Liturgy of the Hours?
@curiousdannii: how? It would be based on a false premise if I didn't exclude those who pray Liturgy of the Hours from "most protestants" for the question's sake. I know that Anglicans and some Protestants pray it, but I also know that most Protestants left this practice - the question is about the reasons of those who left it.
Sep
1
awarded  Benefactor
Sep
1
accepted Why did Protestants abandon Liturgy of the Hours?
Aug
26
revised Why did Protestants abandon Liturgy of the Hours?
added 1931 characters in body; edited tags
Aug
26
comment Why did Protestants abandon Liturgy of the Hours?
This is better than the previous accepted answer - this summarizes more reasons why modern protestants usually don't pray Liturgy of Hours. I'm almost sure that points 1 and 3 applied in the 16th century as well. However, the point of praying X times a day is so that the prayer lingered on (in a less-formal and usually less explicit manner) after each time of prayer, helping to pray constantly; first reformers likely knew this. And there are mentions about praising God by singing psalms (like Eph 5,19) and praising God seven times a day (Ps 119,164), so essense of this practice IS in Bible.
Aug
26
awarded  Promoter
Jul
20
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
30
awarded  Constituent