1,267 reputation
1831
bio website sites.google.com/site/…
location TBD
age 48
visits member for 2 years
seen 3 hours ago

Move along. Nothing (much) to see.


14h
revised “Felix culpa” - is it correct?
slightly rephrased, added Wikipedia link and quote
17h
comment “Felix culpa” - is it correct?
The Felix culpa Wikipedia article (which was linked from the Exsultet article) mentions that "The Catholic saint Ambrose also speaks of the fortunate ruin of Adam in the Garden of Eden in that his sin brought more good to humanity than if he had stayed perfectly innocent." and also mentions that "Thomas Aquinas cited this line".
17h
suggested suggested edit on “Felix culpa” - is it correct?
1d
awarded  Yearling
Oct
14
comment Poor defined as 'Any Poor' or 'Christian Poor'
@Flimzy By "Christian" I suspect the OP means "member of the community of faith" (applying a new term to an old category, analogous to the apostle Paul's applying the old term "Israel of God" to the Church). OT passages about "alien in the land" would also apply for answering this question. Sadly (because I like the story), Ruth would not apply because Ruth joined the community.
Oct
14
comment Poor defined as 'Any Poor' or 'Christian Poor'
Galations 6:10 ("So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, and especially to those who are of the household of faith." [ESV]) rather clearly indicates helping Christians has a higher emphasis but helping non-Christians is urged. (This is not really enough for a real answer but may help someone else compose an answer.)
Oct
14
comment New Testament Poetry
2 Tim. 2:11-13 is believed to present a fragment of a hymn/poem. Mary's Magnificat (Luke 1:46-55) is a poem/song (often typeset with line breaks as in the linked Bible Gateway page). The Magnificat is an expected flowing into verse for ecstatic praise (and would indicate Mary was familiar with Scriptural poetry both in form and themes—no great revelation). An early hymn expressing doctrine as in 2 Tim. would point out that the writer is part of a broader theological group (orthodox) and that the early church embraced this artistic expression and method of teaching/encouraging.
Oct
12
comment How is a Christian supposed to fear God when “there is no fear in love” (1 John 4:18)?
From On the Song of Songs (Chapter 33, Bernard of Clairvaux; The Treasury of Christian Spiritual Classics, p. 319): "God demands fear, as Lord; honor, as Father; but as the Bridegroom He demands our love. Love is the highest of these three; without it fear has torment and honour is graceless. Fear is servile, unless love makes it free [cf. Rom. 8:15]; and honor which does not proceed from love is adulation. Honour and fear are due to God alone; but He will accept neither, unless love's honey sweeten it." (bracketed comment is mine)
Oct
9
comment What are the meanings of the mote and beam in the parable?
Matthew 23:24 is a comparable statement (also concerning hypocrisy): "You blind guides, straining out a gnat and swallowing a camel!" (ESV).
Oct
6
comment Does the bible say everyone can interact with Jesus as much as we want in Heaven?
Ah, but are you sure about premise 2? If there are an infinite number of worlds (i.e., not just earth) with beings that have souls, there might be an infinite number of beings in heaven. Now the number of saints may be countably infinite and the time be described as some larger infinity … ☺
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
29
revised Has the Catholic Church ever declared any group that identified itself Christian as not Christian?
added links
Sep
29
suggested suggested edit on Has the Catholic Church ever declared any group that identified itself Christian as not Christian?
Sep
23
revised Persecution of Jewish people by Christians in Middle Ages?
indicated Bible version and added block quote formatting
Sep
23
suggested suggested edit on Persecution of Jewish people by Christians in Middle Ages?
Sep
16
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
4
comment What is the prayer aim?
Closely related: "What is the purpose of Prayer?"
Aug
30
comment What is the Biblical basis that God does not punish disobedient Christians beyond the immediate natural consequences?
It seems that the line between discipline and punishment can be unclear. Both are unpleasant, both can be a response to improper behavior. Punishment has more of a sense of retribution (justice) whereas discipline is directed toward training in righteousness and perhaps removing occasions of sin. If discipline (at least of certain types) is considered punishment despite not being based on retribution, then a different answer would be given than if not.
Aug
22
awarded  Curious
Aug
21
comment Did medieval European monasticism provide a release from certain societal pressures?
I would appreciate help in improving this question. Even though I think it is not bad subjective, it seems that, as written, it might lean in that direction.