8,165 reputation
12354
bio website softwaremonkey.org
location Seattle, WA
age 46
visits member for 3 years, 10 months
seen Jul 2 at 18:24

I am a committed Christian; I guess one would best describe me as "Evangelical", though it's tough to find a moniker that works well. My Christian experience runs the gambit from Pentecostal to Catholic.

I enjoy philosophical and scientific discussions and I am firmly convinced that real, practical Christianity engages the whole person, heart, mind and spirit. Christianity is a faith that involves reason and intellect, an aspect which has been neglected in the 20th/21st century church.

Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect.

Romans 12:1-3


Jun
24
comment Does the Bible say anything about chimeras or explains their purpose?
Perhaps we just shouldn't place overmuch stock in an imaginative work?
Jun
24
comment Does the Bible say anything about chimeras or explains their purpose?
The parenthetical is much more than just odd -- it's an editorial comment by the inspired author.
Jun
24
comment Does the Bible say anything about chimeras or explains their purpose?
The descendants of Anak were also called nephilim: Num 1:33, "We saw the Nephilim there (the descendants of Anak come from the Nephilim)." Which provides an interesting conumdrum -- if the Nephilim were giants, and existed post-flood, how did they survive the flood, unless the Nephilim blood was in Noah?
Jun
24
revised What is the difference between forgiveness and reconciliation
added 1 character in body
Jun
15
comment What is an overview of how Christian commentators have explained rulers to be a terror to bad conduct?
He also knew of his own mistreatment of Christians when he was an unbeliever, sanctioned by the Jewish rulers.
Jun
3
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
3
comment What is the biblical basis for the claim that abortion is immoral?
This answer completely misses the point of the cited scripture. Simply put, if someone injures a pregnant woman resulting in a premature birth and the baby is not completely healthy the aggressor will pay for the baby's injury, life for life, etc. But if the baby is healthy and normal the normal retribution is all that is required. IOW, cause the abortion of a baby and pay for it with your own life. That in no way suggests that an unborn baby is worth less than a "regular person", but is quite to the contrary. I wish atheists would learn basic exegesis before they pontificate on scripture.
Jun
3
awarded  Nice Answer
May
4
comment Nakedness in the Bible
I think what he's getting at is that biblical Hebrew has about 8,500 words from about 4,200 word roots so most words perform multiple duty. Which means there's way, way more breadth in Hebrew than, say, modern English, which is a very precise language.
Apr
27
comment Questions about soul
@TheFreemason: That was a capital O because it was the beginning of a sentence. I am talking about historic, orthodox Christian theology. The physicality of the resurrection and the nature of the resurrection body is addressed and well attested in scripture. Denominations may quibble about the specifics but the fact of a physical resurrection is agreed on by all major branches of Christianity. It takes only a cursory reading of 1 Cor 15 to know that it's not exactly the same body with the same limitations that we have now.
Apr
27
comment Questions about soul
@Andrew: To which comment are you referring? What I said about the eternal state of human beings is fully consistent with Catholic teaching. And what I said about after-death repentance was not that the Catholic stance was wrong but rather that it does not logically follow from the historic orthodox Christian position that we are conscious and aware between our physical death and the great resurrection. This is not denominational claim, but simply applying logical reasoning -- that's all. Unless you mean to claim that Catholicism has never erred at all in any of its teaching?
Apr
27
comment Is 'Non-Catholic Non-Orthodox Modern Western Denomination' an ok definition of Protestant?
@Drew: There is a major branch of Christendom, arising from the original Eastern Roman Empire called "Eastern Orthodox Catholic Church", or the shorter form "Orthodox Christian". They are a distinct branch from the Eastern Catholic church (the latter now being in full communion with the Roman Catholic church, though not for all of their existence). They (the Orthodox) split from the Roman Church over issue of Papal primacy and over the Filioque, the wording of the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed which states the Holy Spirit proceeds from the Father "and (from) the Son".
Apr
27
comment Is 'Non-Catholic Non-Orthodox Modern Western Denomination' an ok definition of Protestant?
To the question, as a Protestant Christian I would quite object to being called "non-orthodox" (smile). I agree with @kutschkem, define yourself, if you must, by what you are, not by what you aren't.
Apr
27
comment Is 'Non-Catholic Non-Orthodox Modern Western Denomination' an ok definition of Protestant?
@Drew: Actually the Eastern-rite Catholic branch on Christendom is quite distinct from the (capital-O) Orthodox branch.
Apr
27
comment Questions about soul
Certainly not the same physical body, but a physical body nonetheless. You need only look to Jesus post-resurrection state and 1 Cor 15.
Apr
27
comment Questions about soul
Orthodox Christian teaching is that the entire human being has forward-eternality; there will be a resurrection, for believers to eternal life, and for unbelievers to eternal death. But for both to an eternal physical reality.
Apr
27
comment Questions about soul
@TheFreemason: Orthodox Christianity holds that the mind is a function of the soul and survives death, along with memories. The argument from brain damage only demonstrates a failure in the physical aspect of recall and/or communication. Consider a computer program with a memory leak -- the memory is not gone, but a software fault has made it inaccessible; in similar manner a hardware fault (physical failing) might disconnect or disrupt the mind from fully and properly accessing the brain for it's intended purpose. Like damage to the spinal cord prevents the brain from controlling the body.
Apr
27
comment Questions about soul
Also, being conscious does not automatically argue for after-death repentance as a given. Scripture rather indicates that the opportunity for repentance is in this life only.
Apr
27
comment Questions about soul
Human beings a not a forward-eternal soul, but a forward-eternal body/soul. That is our eternal state is physical and spiritual, not purely spiritual. Mind is arguably a function of the soul for which the brain serves as the hardware used to communicate with other beings in this creation. This actually follows from your premise that "after we die we will still have our consciousness..."; your conscious aspect is your mind.
Apr
26
revised Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego - who is understood as the fourth person in the fire?
edited body