21,934 reputation
567188
bio website alerque.com
location Izmir, Turkey
age 32
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 12 mins ago

I am a scripting language connoisseur, regular expression aficionado, network geek, general lover of Linux and a frequent contributor to open source software. I transitioned to programming from other work because I was too busy automating my own work environment to actually do the other work. I have a hobby interest in cartography. For more see my personal site. Most importantly, my life is defined by the grace of God given to men through Jesus Christ. It is my ambition that everything I do would reflect His glory and point people towards Him.


Oct
12
revised Do any Christian traditions intentionally use the name 'Yahweh'?
added 21 characters in body; edited title
Oct
12
comment Do any Christian traditions intentionally use the name 'Yahweh'?
@Flimzy Does it qualify as a question now?
Oct
12
comment Do any Christian traditions intentionally use the name 'Yahweh'?
@Ray How do my edits look?
Oct
12
comment Do any Christian traditions intentionally use the name 'Yahweh'?
I have made an attempt to re-write this question to pose a real question that might be on-topic here as well as answerable with factual references from various Christian doctrines.
Oct
12
revised Do any Christian traditions intentionally use the name 'Yahweh'?
Try to edit to be constructive/on-topic.
Oct
12
comment Do any Christian traditions intentionally use the name 'Yahweh'?
There is potentially a question here but this question is only slightly related to Christianity because few Christian traditions hold a doctrine about not using the name. This is primarily relevant to Jewish tradition and it might be better asked on Judaism.SE.
Oct
11
comment How are the Calvinist, Arminian and Lutheran conceptions of Total Depravity different?
+1. This came up a while back in chat and I think I said I suggested we needed a total depravity vs original sin question. This is a good example of a focused comparison of two doctrines!
Oct
11
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
11
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
10
comment What is unique about Christianity?
This isn't unique. Judaism has (arguably) the same or older verifiable doctrinal records. Islam has texts too. Manuscripts aren't what make the claims of Christianity verifiable. History mostly proves the legitimacy of the texts, not what the texts claim. It's what the texts claim that is so different.
Oct
10
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
10
comment Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?
@Shathur: Yes you're right. I made the change, thank you.
Oct
10
revised Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?
added 3 characters in body; edited title
Oct
10
comment What about those who lived before Christ long outside the reach of Israel?
I am interested in hearing what you think "this specific topic" that is not specifically covered in any of the questions I linked. Whatever that specific topic is might deserve a new question of it's own. I just didn't see it in here, hence the close. Is there something I didn't catch about the question as a whole that makes it different than a sum of it's parts and thus deserving separate treatment? I'm more than open to reconsidering here, I just think whatever it is that makes this question unique needs to be clear before we open it.
Oct
10
revised What about those who lived before Christ long outside the reach of Israel?
added 118 characters in body
Oct
10
comment What is unique about Christianity?
@MarcGravell: You're turning blue, shall I call for a medic? In all seriousness however we could go through those one by one to show how the basis of those and the sense in which their resurrections is understood is fundamentally different, but I'll safe my breath and try to qualify my statement so it's more apparent in what way Christianity is unique.
Oct
10
comment What is unique about Christianity?
I think you have a valid point about the other usages being "not quite the same" and Christianity being more pro-active in this area, but this is hardly a unique or stand-apart aspect of Christianity. I know lots of religions and constituents that emphasis the pro-active nature of good works and the Golden rule. Whether other texts are quite as clear on the matter could be argued, but I would say this is getting dowvoted not because it is a false statement about Christianity but because it is not a uniquely identifying radically different aspect of it.
Oct
10
comment Where do we draw the line when questioning/testing God?
Related question that sticks to defining 'testing': What does it mean to test God?
Oct
10
asked What is the difference between 'Biblical' and 'Systematic' theology?
Oct
10
asked Were there provisions for salvation for non-Hebrews in the OT?