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Sep
29
comment If the Bible has been changed over the years, can we still trust it?
I wouldn't go so far as to say it is everything, but you can't just throw it to the wind without consequences. Also, there is no need to as it actually holds up to that kind of scrutiny.
Sep
29
comment If the Bible has been changed over the years, can we still trust it?
@JimG. If anything, the question would be the thing to tighten up, this is a huge topic. Each of Mike's points are both relevant and even succinct and would individually deserve more attention. They are even organized and clearly formatted. Nobody is forcing you to read them.
Sep
29
revised According to the Bible, what kind of debt, if any, is lawful?
Cross linked related posts.
Sep
29
comment According to the Bible, what kind of debt, if any, is lawful?
Taken to chat starting here.
Sep
29
comment According to the Bible, what kind of debt, if any, is lawful?
If I were to extrapolate from your statement that 'none remains', one would quote you: "So the literal answer to your question is, all murder is lawful for Christians, we are under grace." Is that a statement you want your name next to?
Sep
29
comment According to the Bible, what kind of debt, if any, is lawful?
So ... murder rape and pillage? Do the Ten Commandments and moral standards ratified in the OT and affirmed by Christ himself now mean nothing / carry no weight or significance to believers?
Sep
29
comment According to the Bible, what kind of debt, if any, is lawful?
You start on the wrong foot here with an over-simplification of law vs grace issues. Is murder now lawful but just not beneficial? Being under grace rather than the law in regards to salvation changes neither the goodness of nor the need for obedience to the law. What part of the law did "debt" fall under? Civil? Ceremonial? Moral?
Sep
29
comment According to the Bible, what kind of debt, if any, is lawful?
Would an appeal to Doctrines and Covenants as an authoritative guide to interpreting the Protestant canon on this issue make a valid answer here?
Sep
29
revised Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
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Sep
29
revised Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
added 65 characters in body
Sep
29
revised Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
added 45 characters in body
Sep
29
revised Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
edited tags
Sep
29
comment What official statements represent Christianity's position on the Gospel of Barnabas?
This has some rough edges but does the best job of anything so far in summing up the issue. The witness of Irenaeus and others that would have dealt with this issue is important and answers the question about Christianity's official position. That Islamic scholarship agrees about the nature of the work drives the point home. The material's self-contradictory nature is kind of beside the point. If it was early and genuine, any difficult facts it brought to light would need to be examined. Since it clearly is not, it's display or non-display of a cross hardly matters.
Sep
29
accepted What official statements represent Christianity's position on the Gospel of Barnabas?
Sep
29
revised What official statements represent Christianity's position on the Gospel of Barnabas?
The manuscript itself is in Italian with a few Turkish and Arabic words mixed in.
Sep
29
answered Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
Sep
29
accepted Under what conditions can a “good” or “charitable” act actually be sin?
Sep
28
comment Are Christians supposed to suffer?
Affable and I started a conversation about this question and question frameworks in general here in chat. We didn't solve the world's problems but we invite you to follow along and pitch in your thoughts!
Sep
28
comment Are Christians supposed to suffer?
-1 because I tried to answer this and realized that there wasn't really a way to do it without turning it into a truth claim question where answers are going to fight over what doctrine is right rather than answering how Christianity handles this. It's too big a topic to do a fair overview of multiple views at the detailed level of analysis you are calling for.
Sep
28
comment Are Christians supposed to suffer?
Note to the OP. I feel like this is a bad answer because you framed the question poorly. You tied our hands and, without making a wreck of the question, no Christian view can actually be represented properly.