2,558 reputation
21140
bio website
location Taiwan
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen 2 hours ago

I often chose best answers not because they are the best, but because I have to choose a best answer. Please, don't take offense to it.


Jul
14
comment If Jesus is God, who/where does Jesus pray to?
"Is it God being in two places at once, being omnipresent?" - Yes, you got it exactly right. This was simply the continuation of the fellowship in God that has always been there before the creation of the world - the fellowship between the Father and the Son, both of which are the same and One God. Since by the time the Garden of Gethsemane episode, Son had already been incarnated, it looked as a prayer now - any human willing to have fellowship with God does it through a prayer.
Jul
13
comment Are Mormons Protestants?
If your definition of "Protestant" is the one who calls himself a Christian and does not belong to the Oriental Orthodoxy, Catholicism or Eastern Orthodoxy, then Mormons will fall into this category. However, if you say that a protestant is the one who calls himself a Christian, does not belong to to the Oriental Orthodoxy, Catholicism or Eastern Orthodoxy, and yet believes that Jesus is God, then Mormons will be dismissed.
Jul
13
comment Are Mormons Protestants?
It all depends on what you mean by "Protestant". Webster's reserves two definitions for the word "insects" - one for those having only three pairs of legs and the other one for those having just many legs. A child will say that a spider is an insect, and a scientist will say not, and both will be correct according to Webster's, because they will be using different definitions. So, it all depends on what definition you are using for the word "Protestants".
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@Caleb - I've met a lot of people considering LDS to be protestants, even though, they themselves, as you have rightly said, don't consider themselves to be as such. As the matter of fact, in the Orthodoxy there is a tendency to count LDS and JW as Protestants - often with a view to clearly show "the fallacy of all Protestantism". David's words ("If you expand this to include the LDS") show that the chance of making this inclusion is still there. Therefore, I will roll-back your edit on this point.
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
Well, I think it's self-explanatory that I address here those of the Protestants to whom these "accusations" are applicable. I mean, if, say, there are Protestants who continue in the line of the Apostolic succession as it is seen by the Orthodox Church, then it must be quite clear that this question is not for them (because the Orthodox Church simply doesn't "accuse" them of not being in the line of the Apostolic succession).
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@waxeagle - What do you mean?
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@waxeagle - "What are you actually trying to learn?" - I am trying to learn how the Protestants in general response to those assertions of their "spiritual disadvantages".
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
Ooops! Thanks for your answer and for reminding me to exclude LDS and JW from my question. I will edit my question.
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
In fact, I think my question will be close very soon. However, I think some general ideas can still be written out here.
Jul
11
comment Apostle John lived in Ephesus - what sources claim that?
@caseyr547 - So, the core difference lies in the verifiability, right?
Jul
11
comment Apostle John lived in Ephesus - what sources claim that?
@Caleb - "Just a tradition? Why downplay history?" - Caleb, how do you distinguish tradition from history? Where does the tradition stop and history starts?
Jun
26
comment What O.T passages do premillenialists believe to be about the Millennial Kingdom?
@Caleb - "This is an internet site run by a secular company with a general scope of a ..." - Do you really think that you need to start singing this same old song to me almost each time when I ask a new question?! I know what kind of site this one is. Specifying that I want to hear from a "main-stream" is a small attempt to narrow down to (not to secure) the scope that I am trying to target here - there is nothing wrong in making such an attempt and I have all rights to do it. BTW, if you really have a video with JW or LDS addressing Jesus in prayer, then, please, send a link to me.
Jun
26
comment What O.T passages do premillenialists believe to be about the Millennial Kingdom?
@Caleb - "It's quite an unnecessary distinction for this question" - Caleb, it's unnecessary in your head, but to me it's more than unnecessary. I simply don't want to waste my time on reading stuff from some people who are not born of God. I mean I wouldn't mind doing it at other time, but at the moment I need some quick answer from a brother in Christ, not just from someone who calls himself a Christian. That's why I said in my question earlier that I want a main-stream perspective. BTW, the definition to "main-stream" was not in question, it was my answer in a comment to a question about it
Jun
26
comment What O.T passages do premillenialists believe to be about the Millennial Kingdom?
Who on earth deleted my comment with definition of main-stream Christianity? And why was it omitted from my question? I am not at all interested in knowing the answer from those who out of principle don't pray to Jesus.
Jun
26
comment What O.T passages do premillenialists believe to be about the Millennial Kingdom?
@Caleb "I can show you videos of LDS church leaders praying in Jesus name just as you describe" - You don't need to. I know how they pray all too well. Praying to God, addressing Him by name "Jesus" is absolutely different from praying to God and adding "we are praying in the name of Your Son Jesus Christ" in the end of the prayer. I thought I spelled that out clearly enough in my definition. It is just as different as "Caleb, I want to tell you this and this ... " is different from saying to someone "I am telling you this and this in the name of that Caleb".
Jun
26
comment What O.T passages do premillenialists believe to be about the Millennial Kingdom?
@Caleb - "Your definition of "mainstream Christianity" doesn't help at all ... Jehovah Witnesses and Mormons might both fit that umbrella" - My definition of the main-stream Christianity excludes Jehovah Witnesses and Mormons from taking part in answering my question in the first place.
Jun
23
comment What is the origin of the Doctrine of Trinity?
@H3br3wHamm3r81 - "While the Bible does say that there is one God (Mark 12:32: εἷς ἐστιν θεὸς), there are other beings also referred to as θεός" - Bible states that there is only One Creator of all things, and among other beings referred to as θεὸς only that One who created everything is the real God.
Apr
7
comment Why the Eucharist is never mentioned in the book of Hebrews?
@Caleb (5) - The only answer that sounds plausible to me and very logical is that Eucharist is not really as important as, for example, believing in Christ and in His work on the cross. Hence, I chose the third answer by the.midget as the best one. Should any other answer arrive that looks more logical and more convincing to me, I will choose that one then, but so far it hasn’t happened.
Apr
7
comment Why the Eucharist is never mentioned in the book of Hebrews?
@Caleb (4) - Also, the book of Hebrews is famous for explaining proto-types and symbols, not for speaking in types and symbols. In fact, I can’t find one place in this book where the author would speak in types and figures and not in plain language. Therefore, the belief that the Eucharist is “implied” by the words of author in chapter 7 on Melchizedek, where the author in fact explains the type of Melchizedek, sounds also very unconvincing to me (cwallenpoole’s answer).
Apr
7
comment Why the Eucharist is never mentioned in the book of Hebrews?
@Caleb (3) - It is obvious that the book wasn’t written spontaneously at one setting. On the other hand, unlike, say, the book of Acts, it does have as its aim to touch upon crucial matters of Christian faith – at the end of each section covering one crucial matter there is a strong warning not to fall away from believing in that matter. Therefore, the position that holds Eucharist as one of such important matters and at the same time considers that it was not mentioned in Hebrews just “because the book’s topic is the High Priesthood of Christ” (Alypius’ answer) sounds very unconvincing to me.