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I often chose best answers not because they are the best, but because I have to choose a best answer. Please, don't take offense to it.


Aug
2
comment In what sense did Judas betray Jesus?
(2) considered a traitor of the USA who has betrayed his own country as long as he is an American citizen and not the Russian spy that was born in Russia and later was able to get into the high-secrecy circles of the USA. Do you see my point?
Aug
2
comment In what sense did Judas betray Jesus?
(1) Has Judas really been His friend or follower? I mean, it might have looked like that outwardly, but in his essence he was Satan (John 6:70), the son of perdition predestined for his role (John 13:18,27,17:20). Jesus, of course, knew that from the very beginning. So, if things were this way with Judas since the very beginning then what other sense besides "giving away" can be attached to the word "betrayed" here? He just fulfilled his mission. I mean, Snowden can be
Aug
2
comment In what sense did Judas betray Jesus?
@DJClayworth - "I assumed you knew that Judas was one of Jesus closest follower" - Unless you mean something special, your assumption is correct.
Aug
2
comment In what sense did Judas betray Jesus?
@DJClayworth - (2) considered a traitor of the USA who has betrayed his own country as long as he is an American citizen and not the Russian spy that was born in Russia and later was able to get into the high-secrecy circles of the USA. Do you see my point?
Aug
2
comment In what sense did Judas betray Jesus?
@DJClayworth - (1) "If I am your friend, even more if I am your follower..." - Has Judas ever been His friend or follower? I mean, it might have looked like that outwardly, but in his essence he was Satan (John 6:70), the son of perdition predestined for his role (John 13:18,27,17:20). Jesus, of course, knew that from the very beginning. So, if things were this way with Judas since the very beginning then what other sense besides "giving away" can be attached to the word "betrayed" here? He just fulfilled his mission. I mean, Snowden can be
Aug
2
comment In what sense did Judas betray Jesus?
@Anonymous - So, it's a "give away" sense, not the sense of breaking some given promise or some implied behavior code, right?
Jul
16
comment What are the major differences between Eastern and Western Orthodox Christianities?
I think you need to further split "the Eastern Christianity" into Oriental and the Orthodox ones. "Western Christianity" must also be split into at least Catholicism and Protestantism. As for the differences between Western Catholicism and the Eastern Orthodox Christianity, just to mention a few, a huge difference in understanding of Eucharist, not believing (by EOC) that Mary was born of immaculate conception, not recognizing (by EOC) the authority of the Pope as the Head of the Church.
Jul
15
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
(4) the Sower in Matthew 13 signifies the world as this interpretation is already found there in the Bible, however, a believer can choose whether or not to believe that Woman of the Apocalypse in Revelation 12 is the Church, or Mary, or Israel, as none of these interpretations are put forth in the Bible. I kind of detected the lack of this understanding in the first part of your answer. Apart from that, it’s a great answer. Thank you.
Jul
15
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
(3) choose whether or not to believe and accept any story and any interpretation that is not contained in the Bible. For example, one can’t disbelieve the account of the resurrection of Jesus Christ or the story of how Apostle Paul was called, however, a believer is free not to believe the story of Assumption of Mary or the story of how Apostle Luke painted the very first icon. Also, a believer, can’t disbelieve the interpretation holding that the field in the parable of
Jul
15
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
(2) protestant writings and who would dare to say that none of that has the inspiration of the Holy Spirit? Besides, it is a very well-known fact that the very author of ‘sola scriptura’, Martin Luther, treated the book of James as an “epistle of straw” and even wanted it to be dropped from the Bible! How does this go along with ‘sola scriptura’? The very essence of ‘sola scriptura’ is the proposition that a believer for his salvation must believe and accept as true all the stories and all the interpretations that are already existing in the Bible, however, he is free to
Jul
15
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
(1) Among 5 'solas' 'sola scriptura' is the most misunderstood and misinterpreted one - not only by non-protestants, but even often by Protestants themselves. Does 'sola scriptura' mean that the Scripture is a kind of intelligent living being that can interpret itself? Does it mean that because “the Scripture interprets itself” no other writings should be accepted or considered as inspired by the Holy Spirit?! Of course not! If that were the case then Protestants should've not written anything and had to read only the Bible. However, we have a great bulk of
Jul
15
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@Dan - "the starting point in this discussion is authority ... For the Protestant, "scripture alone" (sola scriptura) is the sole norm and authority in the Christian faith" - For the question that have asked here the sola scriptura principle is not important - if there are such protestants who consider other-then-the-Bible writings as their authority (I've met such ones) and at the same time they also pray to Jesus, they are also welcome to answer my question.
Jul
15
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@caseyr547 - I take it as a common sense that if you love a person you want to talk to him directly - not just talk to some third person in the name of the one whom you love. It is quite clear to me from such passages as Acts 7:59 and 9:1-20 that communicating directly to Jesus in prayer was a practice that early Christians wouldn't give up on even at the face of death. However, we are already going off-topic here. In the context of this question praying to Jesus is an enough distinction for me between the main-stream protestants (to them I addressed this question) and others.
Jul
15
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@caseyr547 - Praying to the Father is equally important to me as praying to Jesus. However, if I know that somebody just prays to the Father, it doesn't yet guarantee to me that the (O/o)ne to whom he prays by calling (H/h)im "Father" is the same very God that I am also praying to (John 8:41-44: "They said to him ... "We have one Father, even God" ... Jesus said to them, "If God were your Father, you would love me ... You are of your father the devil ... ").
Jul
14
comment If Jesus is God, who/where does Jesus pray to?
"Is it God being in two places at once, being omnipresent?" - Yes, you got it exactly right. This was simply the continuation of the fellowship in God that has always been there before the creation of the world - the fellowship between the Father and the Son, both of which are the same and One God. Since by the time the Garden of Gethsemane episode, Son had already been incarnated, it looked as a prayer now - any human willing to have fellowship with God does it through a prayer.
Jul
13
comment Are Mormons Protestants?
If your definition of "Protestant" is the one who calls himself a Christian and does not belong to the Oriental Orthodoxy, Catholicism or Eastern Orthodoxy, then Mormons will fall into this category. However, if you say that a protestant is the one who calls himself a Christian, does not belong to to the Oriental Orthodoxy, Catholicism or Eastern Orthodoxy, and yet believes that Jesus is God, then Mormons will be dismissed.
Jul
13
comment Are Mormons Protestants?
It all depends on what you mean by "Protestant". Webster's reserves two definitions for the word "insects" - one for those having only three pairs of legs and the other one for those having just many legs. A child will say that a spider is an insect, and a scientist will say not, and both will be correct according to Webster's, because they will be using different definitions. So, it all depends on what definition you are using for the word "Protestants".
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@Caleb - I've met a lot of people considering LDS to be protestants, even though, they themselves, as you have rightly said, don't consider themselves to be as such. As the matter of fact, in the Orthodoxy there is a tendency to count LDS and JW as Protestants - often with a view to clearly show "the fallacy of all Protestantism". David's words ("If you expand this to include the LDS") show that the chance of making this inclusion is still there. Therefore, I will roll-back your edit on this point.
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
Well, I think it's self-explanatory that I address here those of the Protestants to whom these "accusations" are applicable. I mean, if, say, there are Protestants who continue in the line of the Apostolic succession as it is seen by the Orthodox Church, then it must be quite clear that this question is not for them (because the Orthodox Church simply doesn't "accuse" them of not being in the line of the Apostolic succession).
Jul
13
comment How do Protestants in general respond to these points concerning them?
@waxeagle - What do you mean?