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I often chose best answers not because they are the best, but because I have to choose a best answer. Please, don't take offense to it.


Jan
31
comment When is the first documented case of Christians praying to the dead saints?
I agree with @bruisedreed - the quote is quite irrelevant to my question.
Jan
31
comment When is the first documented case of Christians praying to the dead saints?
What does the word "ye" mean in that passage? Does it mean "you"?
Jan
19
comment “Jesus said to them ”I am" (John 18:6) - Did Jesus break a taboo here?
Thanks for your answer. Too bad, I've read it only now.
Jan
19
comment “Jesus said to them ”I am" (John 18:6) - Did Jesus break a taboo here?
@curiousdannii - "The whole question is based on a false premise" - If the question is something like "Since all cats are humans, then why they do not talk like humans?", you can tell then that it's based on the false premise ("cat are humans"), however, if the question is "Are cats humans?", then it's absolutely a reasonable question and there are no false premises in it.
Jan
10
comment Did Luther have any disagreements with the teachings of Augustine of Hippo?
I see. Thank you.
Dec
12
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@thedarkwanderer - "Neither the Catholic nor Orthodox churches make any claim to operate sola scriptura, which is your real issue here" - Don't quite understand why you brought up the issue of sola scriptura here. Can you, please, elaborate?
Oct
17
comment What things did John the Baptist say that the elders and priests did not believe?
WOW!!! Great answer! Thank you.
Sep
13
comment What would be a typical Christian Pacifist response to 'rampant evil' - say in the form of large scale terrorism?
which every believer should be doing: "But if any provide not for his own, and specially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel" (1st Tim. 5:8)
Sep
13
comment What would be a typical Christian Pacifist response to 'rampant evil' - say in the form of large scale terrorism?
To my understanding, pacifism is keeping and promoting peace if it's possible ("IF IT BE POSSIBLE, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men" - Rom. 12:18). However, if someone is already (about to be) killing someone, then there is no peace here and a simple math comes into play: if he kills my son, this will be an act of evil, and if I kill the one who is going to kill my son, this will also be an act of evil, so the outcome will still be evil. However, if I kill the one who is about to kill my son, I'll do that not out of aggression, but out defense and care for my household,
Aug
22
comment Why did God need to plant the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the garden of Eden in the first place?
"... the book of Romans ... meant that eating that particular fruit of the knowledge of good and evil was not a sin until God made it a law not to eat it" - Well, God forbade humans from eating from that tree (= made it a law for them not to eat from that tree) BEFORE they ate from that tree (no wonder Adam later became afraid of God and hid from Him). In other words, in case with Adam and Eve there was no such time when, after the moment of partaking of that tree, it would still not be a sin for them. So, I kind of don't see how that point of the book of Romans is relevant to my question.
Jun
18
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt - That's a very good piece of evidence showing that that kind of "incorruptibility" can happen to anyone's body.Thank you Matt.
Jun
9
comment What were the early Christians officially persecuted for?
"Nowhere in the Old Testament teaches to hate thine enemy" - in fact, I also thought about it, but was too lazy to check - just concluded that the O.T. hate-your-enemy teaching could be derived from numerous stories in Judges, when Israel suffered because of sparing some of those nations in Canaan. You seem to posses a golden bar of knowledge, especially when it comes to Aramaic primacy. I really wish this matter were given a full and objective review in academia instead of being treated like a "curious theory just for fun".
Jun
9
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt - Good point, Matt, thank you. If you stumble upon some sources on the internet telling about this "incorruptibility" - even if it's about animals, like your story with that cat - please, let me know.
Jun
9
comment How many languages did apostle Paul speak?
@konwayk - "I also thought I should share this link with you about the actual truth behind Dead Sea scrolls" - Thanks for the link and for opening the world of metapedia to me!
Jun
8
comment What were the early Christians officially persecuted for?
@GregMcNulty - "Jesus was a false prophet and claiming to be God, one of the biggest breaking of Jewish laws!" - Which points of the law did it exactly break?
Jun
8
comment What were the early Christians officially persecuted for?
Never even thought that the phrase "traditions of the fathers" could refer to a collection of writings. And, of course, didn't know that it could've been Talmud. Thanks a lot. Feel like I really need to read Josephus' books now.
Jun
8
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt: "If a body was truly incorruptible, it just wouldn't decay at all even with all the organs intact" - I agree with you. That's why I need cases when the dead bodies of common people (not of saints) are not decaying or only partly decaying - just like in case with those saints' dead bodies.
Jun
8
comment How many languages did apostle Paul speak?
Wow!! Quite informative. Thank you!
Jun
7
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt - "The problem with this is that even people who could not have been believers have been found "incorruptible"" - Can you, please, provide some sources? Please, keep in mind that it shouldn't be something like hand-made mummification or incorruptibility because of some natural causes (for example, a body frozen in ice). It should be a case (cases) when a person's body is found "incorruptible" (partially "incorruptible" or partially decayed) while other dead bodies found in the same place are all fully decayed. Bones and hair, of course, never fully decay, so it must be parts of flesh.
May
11
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
"To attribute this condition to a particular level of piety in certain individuals on the one hand, but to seek to explain it via naturalistic processes in cases like Otzi the Iceman on the other, would seem to require no small measure of logical inconsistency" - Isn't Otzi preserved thanks to the ice? The cases that the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics point out are the cases, in which - at least, as they claim - the saints' bodies didn't decay (didn't fully decay) without any such "help" like ice or salt or anything similar to that.