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I often chose best answers not because they are the best, but because I have to choose a best answer. Please, don't take offense to it.


Jun
18
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt - That's a very good piece of evidence showing that that kind of "incorruptibility" can happen to anyone's body.Thank you Matt.
Jun
9
comment What were the early Christians officially persecuted for?
"Nowhere in the Old Testament teaches to hate thine enemy" - in fact, I also thought about it, but was too lazy to check - just concluded that the O.T. hate-your-enemy teaching could be derived from numerous stories in Judges, when Israel suffered because of sparing some of those nations in Canaan. You seem to posses a golden bar of knowledge, especially when it comes to Aramaic primacy. I really wish this matter were given a full and objective review in academia instead of being treated like a "curious theory just for fun".
Jun
9
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt - Good point, Matt, thank you. If you stumble upon some sources on the internet telling about this "incorruptibility" - even if it's about animals, like your story with that cat - please, let me know.
Jun
9
comment How many languages did apostle Paul speak?
@konwayk - "I also thought I should share this link with you about the actual truth behind Dead Sea scrolls" - Thanks for the link and for opening the world of metapedia to me!
Jun
8
comment What were the early Christians officially persecuted for?
@GregMcNulty - "Jesus was a false prophet and claiming to be God, one of the biggest breaking of Jewish laws!" - Which points of the law did it exactly break?
Jun
8
comment What were the early Christians officially persecuted for?
Never even thought that the phrase "traditions of the fathers" could refer to a collection of writings. And, of course, didn't know that it could've been Talmud. Thanks a lot. Feel like I really need to read Josephus' books now.
Jun
8
awarded  Nice Question
Jun
8
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt: "If a body was truly incorruptible, it just wouldn't decay at all even with all the organs intact" - I agree with you. That's why I need cases when the dead bodies of common people (not of saints) are not decaying or only partly decaying - just like in case with those saints' dead bodies.
Jun
8
accepted How many languages did apostle Paul speak?
Jun
8
comment How many languages did apostle Paul speak?
Wow!! Quite informative. Thank you!
Jun
7
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
@Matt - "The problem with this is that even people who could not have been believers have been found "incorruptible"" - Can you, please, provide some sources? Please, keep in mind that it shouldn't be something like hand-made mummification or incorruptibility because of some natural causes (for example, a body frozen in ice). It should be a case (cases) when a person's body is found "incorruptible" (partially "incorruptible" or partially decayed) while other dead bodies found in the same place are all fully decayed. Bones and hair, of course, never fully decay, so it must be parts of flesh.
May
11
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
"To attribute this condition to a particular level of piety in certain individuals on the one hand, but to seek to explain it via naturalistic processes in cases like Otzi the Iceman on the other, would seem to require no small measure of logical inconsistency" - Isn't Otzi preserved thanks to the ice? The cases that the Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholics point out are the cases, in which - at least, as they claim - the saints' bodies didn't decay (didn't fully decay) without any such "help" like ice or salt or anything similar to that.
May
11
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
"To apply to a dead body ... the term "incorrupt" is a serious perversion" - They don't mean to say that those not fully decomposed relics of the saints' dead bodies are in the state of that incorruptibility that pertains solely to the resurrected bodies as described in 1 Corinthians 15. They just point out the fact of having unusual cases, in which, unlike in other cases with other dead bodies, some of their saints' bodies don't fully decay. They consider it to be a miracle - just like other miracles - and repetitively say that protestants don't have such miracles.
May
9
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
"its Elisha's bones in the sepulchre, not an uncorrupted body" - In fact, the word "relics" (when speaking about the dead bodies of the dead saints) in the early centuries of Christianity - well, at least, I can say that for the Eastern Christianity - always meant only the bones (perhaps, hair and nails), but never the flesh. They started meaning "not decomposed pieces of flesh or skin" by the word "relic" much much later.
May
9
comment How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
"What is the basis of belief in incorruptibility of saints in Eastern Orthodoxy anyway?" - Besides the versus you site, they also quote 2Ki 13:21 saying that any miracle that is present with the dead body of a person is somehow indicative of that person's being close to God or having his service to God during his life course been approved by God.
May
7
comment What do the Apologists mean by three persons as “one in nature” if the Son and Spirit are not eternal?
"I totally believe that there exists an eternal Triad: Father, Son and Spirit" - Then the next step must be all the more easy: only God is eternal - if there is anyone who used to be not existing, then that one is a creature and not God. Now, Bible clearly states many times that there exists only One God. Hence, if Those Three are all eternal, and only God is eternal, and there is only One God, summing up these three prepositions in one syllogism, we come to the conclusion that Those Three are One God. Consequently, their nature is divine, i.e. that of God, not of creation.
May
7
comment What do the Apologists mean by three persons as “one in nature” if the Son and Spirit are not eternal?
"was born" doesn't mean "began to exist". In fact, it's exactly when we talk about the "nature, essence and substance" that we can claim that ALL Three are Eternal, and ALL Three are ONE and the Same God. Being Father, that is, the divine Fatherhood, is neither the essence, nor the substance; being the Son, that is, the divine Sonship, is neither the essence, nor the substance. That's why it is okay to say that Father is distinct from the Son, and the Son is distinct fromthe Father. And why on earth the Spirit is not eternal?! The Bible says clearly that the Spirit is eternal (Heb. 9:14).
May
5
awarded  Custodian
May
5
reviewed Approve suggested edit on How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
May
5
revised How do Protestants explain the incorruptibility of Catholic and Orthodox saints?
added 15 characters in body