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I often chose best answers not because they are the best, but because I have to choose a best answer. Please, don't take offense to it.


13h
comment Does Eastern Orthodoxy teach that there are other Apostles?
"Arggh, I mis-read the question. I thought he was referring to the seventy as "other than the 12" - Which is exactly what I meant in my question - meaning that those 70 were other than the 12 - so you didn't mis-read it.
13h
comment Does Eastern Orthodoxy teach that there are other Apostles?
"So not just Orthodox but also Catholics and Protestants believe there were other apostles and disciples besides "the Twelve" - Perhaps, I am wrong, but as far as the Eastern Orthodoxy is concerned, I see them today have and use such titles in their hierarchy as "deacon", "priest", "bishop", "metropolitan" and "patriarch", but never "apostle".
19h
asked Does Eastern Orthodoxy teach that there are other Apostles?
May
25
comment Scriptural basis for monarchical episcopate
"So Judas wasn't even an Apostle when he was alive?" - Yes, he was. But he was not among those Apostles who, according to that article, became qualified to be bishops after the Lord's mission was accomplished.
May
25
comment Scriptural basis for monarchical episcopate
"Do you doubt Matthias, who replaced Judas, was a bishop?" - I'm just trying to follow the logic of the definition in the article that you have cited. That article asserts the idea of apostles being bishops with a definition of apostles being the ones whom Jesus sent to teach and baptize all the nations after Jesus' mission was accomplished. Based on Acts 1:21 we can tell for sure that Matthias was among those sent ones, and, therefore, following the logic of the article, he is a bishop; however, Judas Iscariot was not among those whom Jesus was sending - he was already dead by then.
May
25
comment Scriptural basis for monarchical episcopate
"** Yes, the Apostles were bishops...**" - That article, the link to which you have provided, basis the idea of Apostolate-episcopate on the definition of the Apostles: "sent into the world a body of teachers and preachers after Jesus' mission was accomplished", however, Judas Iscariot was never among those whom He sent to teach all the nations baptizing them into the name of the Father, Son and the Holy Spirit.
May
25
accepted Why First Epistle to St. John by St. Ignatius of Antioch is considered to be spurious?
May
25
comment Why First Epistle to St. John by St. Ignatius of Antioch is considered to be spurious?
WOW!! Great answer! Thank you.
May
25
asked Why First Epistle to St. John by St. Ignatius of Antioch is considered to be spurious?
May
25
comment Scriptural basis for monarchical episcopate
I don't understand. Peter applies these words to Judas Iscariot. Does this mean that Judas was a bishop?!
May
25
asked Scriptural basis for monarchical episcopate
May
22
awarded  Popular Question
May
20
comment Do the Orthodox pray to John the Baptist?
Can you, please, provide some sources.
May
20
comment Do the Orthodox pray to John the Baptist?
@curiousdannii - I don't have any quotes or references. I just saw them pray to many different saints, yet have never seen them pray to John the Baptist. This was all that prompted my question.
May
19
comment Which Apocrypha are part of the Catholic and the Orthodox traditions and which are not? Why?
But... isn't it like all the early Church Fathers, when speaking about the story of presentation of Mary draw that story from the Protevangelium?
May
19
comment Which Apocrypha are part of the Catholic and the Orthodox traditions and which are not? Why?
@MattGutting - "The belief is buttressed by its presence in the Protevangelium, but that doesn't mean they accept the book as a whole as part of their tradition" - In other words, they have some other sources besides the Protevangelium that tells them about that story, right?
May
19
comment Which Apocrypha are part of the Catholic and the Orthodox traditions and which are not? Why?
@MattGutting - "It sounds as if you're asking how these churches decided to choose books for their canon" - No. Apocrypha are by definition not part of canon. I am asking about how they decide which Apocrypha they still keep as a part of their tradition, and which Apocrypha they don't consider to be a part of their tradition.
May
19
revised Which Apocrypha are part of the Catholic and the Orthodox traditions and which are not? Why?
added 750 characters in body; edited title
May
19
comment Which Apocrypha are part of the Catholic and the Orthodox traditions and which are not? Why?
You might want to expand on your answer - I just edited my question. My original intention in it was not to ask about what an Apocrypha is, but rather about what Apocrypha are the part of the Catholic or the Orthodox traditions and which ones are not.
May
19
revised Which Apocrypha are part of the Catholic and the Orthodox traditions and which are not? Why?
added 750 characters in body; edited title