619 reputation
1625
bio website github.com/ahammar
location Trondheim, Norway
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Apr 1 at 20:21
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Mar
1
comment Why does God resort to genocide and destruction?
I wasn't asking about motivation, I was asking about method. An all-powerful god has an infinite number of ways of resolving the situation, so why does he use violence when he has other options?
Feb
28
comment What does TS Eliot mean by “old dispensation” in The Journey of the Magi?
@BenDunlap: Agreed. The plural "gods" on the following line makes Judaism seem especially unlikely.
Feb
23
comment Is it appropriate to capitalize pronouns referring to Jesus Christ?
@PeterTurner: In my experience, I rarely see the name used in articles and disussions on atheist blogs and forums. However, I think the main reason it's rarely used is simply because it isn't part of the common language. Though the reason for that may be what you mentioned, I don't think it's something people really think about. "God", or if further qualification is needed, "The Christian God" is the common term, so people just use that.
Feb
23
comment What are the reasons for calling oneself a “follower of Jesus” rather than a Christian?
I recall reading an article about how the broad use of the "Christian" label in the US is a somewhat more recent thing, possibly due to lobbying, and that using denomination-specific labels used to be much more more common in the past. Ubforntunately, I can't seem to find it, but perhaps someone knows what I'm talking about?
Feb
23
awarded  Fanatic
Feb
23
comment Is it appropriate to capitalize pronouns referring to Jesus Christ?
@MarcGravell: Yes, it depends on the context. In general, I try to use whatever the person I'm communicating with is using. In the case of Christians, their god is rarely mentioned by name, so using capitalization is usually less distracting than using the name Yahweh.
Feb
22
comment Is it appropriate to capitalize pronouns referring to Jesus Christ?
Atheists don't believe in the existence of any gods, so I often use lower case when I'm not talking about any particular god, but capitalize when talking about the God of Christianity. It has nothing to do with whether he deserves it or not. It is simply a way of distinguishing between the general and specific cases.
Feb
22
comment Atheism is the default position. Isn't the burden of proof on the Christian to assert that God exists?
Sounds like the old argument from ignorance to me. "We don't understand everything about quantum mechanics yet, therefore God."
Feb
17
comment Is “the ends justify the means” compatible with Christianity?
@Narnian: Atheism is not the claim that there are no gods. It is only the dismissal of the claim that there are gods. The default position is a question about what we should assume in the absence of evidence. Your claim that there is an "overwhelming" amount of evidence is irrelevant for that question. Also, the claim that there are no gods (which as I pointed out goes beyond the atheist position) is falsifiable, just like the no-unicorns claim is falsifiable (I could falsify it by showing you one). So my question remains: What makes them different with respect to the default position?
Feb
17
comment Is “the ends justify the means” compatible with Christianity?
@Narnian: Then please point out the flaw in my reasoning. So far all you've done is say "no, you're wrong!", which isn't a constructive argument.
Feb
17
comment Is “the ends justify the means” compatible with Christianity?
@RonMaimon: I was talking about claims. The existence of magical beasts was just an example of unfalsifiable claims which most people agree there is insufficient evidence to believe in. I was trying to point out that for unfalsifiable claims the only reasonable default position is to dismiss them. Of course, many believers think they do have sufficient evidence for their beliefs, and the validity of that evidence is a different debate. However, I'm curious about why Narnian seems to think belief should be the default position in absence of evidence.
Feb
17
comment Is “the ends justify the means” compatible with Christianity?
@Narnian: Do you also disagree about non-existence being the default position for leprechauns, unicorns and fairies? If not, what makes the God hypothesis different? They are all unfalsifiable claims; by that standard you would have to believe in all of them, as well as any other unfalsifiable claims I could come up with.
Feb
12
comment Jesus's genealogy: 28 generations or 41 since David?
@DavidStratton: That link is broken, at least for the moment (HTTP 502 errors).
Feb
8
comment End of the world “calculations”
@cwallenpoole: That sounds a lot like the unexpected hanging paradox.
Feb
7
comment Do those who pray to saints ascribe to them the quality of being able to hear many people at once?
"Time has no meaning in heaven" - Got a source for that?
Feb
7
comment Is there a way to prove the God of the Bible?
Of course, these arguments have all been refuted in several ways. However, the main problem is that even if these arguments were all valid, they merely prove a god, not the God of Christianity.
Feb
7
comment How is Christian worship different than Christian religion?
The meaning of "establishment" in the First Amendment is summed up by the lemon test, which details the requirements for legislation concerning religion.
Feb
7
comment Are God, Son (Jesus) and The Holy Spirit Same?
I always found this formulation rather confusing. Perhaps it would help to clarify what the "is" relation means here. Clearly, it does not mean "is the same as", as that would imply that they are all the same (by transitivity), so what does it mean? "Is part of"? "Is a role of"? "Is a kind of"? Something else?
Feb
6
comment Neurotheology and God
"the God hinted at by scientific research" What research? Or is that a quote from the book?
Feb
3
comment What arguments would you give to teenagers who are unconcerned about eternal life?
@AffableGeek: I voted to close because this is asking for opinions, not an answer. It might be more of a problem with the phrasing than with the question itself, though. Especially the "What would you ..." title makes this seem more like an open-ended discussion than a question with a definite answer.