621 reputation
29
bio website sticmann.com/ink
location United States
age 34
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen Jan 30 at 13:26

I am a husband of one, a father of boys, and a member of the catholic body of Christ.


Nov
9
comment Who sent John the Baptist to baptize with water?
Fantastic. Thank you for this very clear and concise addition.
Nov
1
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Liturgical POV)
The last point you made - about the ritual/ceremony involving us in the story - is very interesting. Could you expound on that more? How does the liturgy involve us in the story (other than just by way of reminder as you mentioned)?
Oct
31
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Liturgical POV)
@PeterTurner Yes, perhaps I should have put more emphasis on that point, but I did ask for a biblical basis for the answer in my original question. I also appreciate the weight of tradition, but not much support for that side was given in this answer either.
Oct
30
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Non-Liturgical POV)
Very good. Thank you for clarifying. It seems that you've represented this side competently.
Oct
29
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Liturgical POV)
Welcome to Christianity.SE! Thank you for taking the time to answer. I understand that the subject of this kind of question may be so natural in the Catholic way of thinking that the obviousness is simply assumed. That's just the way it is, right? But here, we'd like to see this answer fleshed out with a well-reasoned and scripturally-supported argument.
Oct
29
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Non-Liturgical POV)
This view would not be consistent with Presbyterians, Methodists, Episcopalians and other liturgical Protestant Evangelical churches (though Episcopal may arguably be on the border of Evangelical). These are not minor groups. It sounds more like a Baptist or Charismatic position.
Oct
29
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Non-Liturgical POV)
Also, I'm not sure I understand what your saying about baptism or communion. Are you hinting toward a "Jesus' Name"/Oneness type doctrine on baptism? And if they weren't eating the Lord's Supper, what were they eating and what actually is it supposed to be?
Oct
29
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Non-Liturgical POV)
Thank you for taking the time to answer. The article you linked to only dealt with the ordination of Aaron, which is one small example of the ritual/ceremonial nature of the OT. Would you mind expanding your answer to include a discussion of this nature as a whole? Obviously I'm not asking you to deal with every detail, but with the fundamentally ceremonial nature of the OT and the transition that has occurred.
Oct
29
comment What place do ritual and ceremony have in the church today? (Non-Liturgical POV)
Thank you for answering. Would you please specify in your answer which denomination/doctrinal foundation this represents? Also, if you don't mind, would you please flesh out a little more the biblical basis for going from the God-prescribed "external form" to the "inward truth"? I've heard the terms before, but I'd like more clarity.
Oct
27
comment Is there anything unique to a christian marriage that non-christian marriages are deprived of?
Ha :) Ok, I've posted a question here: christianity.stackexchange.com/questions/11410/…
Oct
26
comment Is there anything unique to a christian marriage that non-christian marriages are deprived of?
I'd be interested to see your take on all the rituals and ceremonies laid out in the Sinaitic law, the specific guidelines for priests and sacrifices, and the ceremonial and symbolic nature of communion and baptism.
Oct
26
comment Why is Song of Solomon in bible?
Additionally, if Judah and Samaria, the divided kingdom, were considered sisters, then perhaps the Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant divisions within the church could also be considered sisters.
Oct
26
comment Why is Song of Solomon in bible?
I agree that the Song has individual application, but consider the possible connection of the Bride's forced work in the field with Israel's time under Pharaoh (Ex 1:14), or their on and off slavery to the surrounding nations during the time of the judges. As to Israel's sisters, please see Ezekiel 16:44ff. He describes Samaria and Sodom as Israel's sisters.
Oct
26
comment Why is Song of Solomon in bible?
@AffableGeek Thank you. I spent all week putting this together. I changed the intro statement to provide a link for further reading.
Oct
26
comment Why is Song of Solomon in bible?
Not opposing, exactly. I agree that is is a love poem, just not that it is only on the human level.
Oct
19
comment Why is Song of Solomon in bible?
I would respectfully challenge your position. Consider the use of sexual imagery in scripture. For example, the language of adultery is used more often in connection with Israel's relationship with Yahweh than it is with reference to a man and woman. "I am my beloved's and my beloved is mine" is an echo of the oft-repeated covenantal refrain "I will be your God and you will be my people."
Oct
8
comment Does the great great grandmother in George MacDonalds Princess and the Goblin represent a Catholic conception of God?
"welcome to Christianity!" - Haha. Thank you. Regarding Isaiah 49, I see that His love for Zion is compared to a mother's love, but God Himself isn't characterized in the feminine. In the same way, David's expression of love for Jonathan "passing the love of women (2 Sam 1:26)" doesn't mean that David or Jonathan were feminine or in any way sexually involved. This doesn't rule out the fact that the man and woman together were made in the image of God, just that God relates to and interacts with His creation as masculine to feminine.
Sep
20
comment What is the significance of the name “Jesus”?
@Affable Geek Thank you.