2,142 reputation
828
bio website timothy.green.name
location Offaly, Ireland
age
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Apr 18 at 9:08

I'm Irish, of English parents. I was brought up as one of Jehovah's Witnesses, but am now an atheist. I remain fascinated by religion, both those similar to the one I left, and those very different, though I am more interested by the cultural context and the way people approach their beliefs than I am in the actual theology. (From this angle, Liberal Christianity and Liberal Islam are quite similar, and Conservative Christianity and Conservative Islam are quite similar.) Because I am interested in the social context and the interaction of religion and society, I often see religion at its worst, when it is trying to impose its rules on others, being intolerant and sometimes frankly bigoted. As an antidote, to remind myself that religious people are not necessarily evil, I hang around slacktivist (whose writings often attempt to answer the question, Why does the religious right tell lies all the time?) and The Slacktiverse (where people of many religious backgrounds have very civilised arguments, often about literature).

I might describe my own views as empirical materialist (see Tim Minchin: "Storm"), and my philosophy is probably secular humanist (see Tim Minchin: "White Wine in the Sun").


Dec
22
accepted What is the Alpha Course?
Dec
17
comment Is Christianity functionally polytheistic?
@Shredder. I don't think so, though I'd find it difficult to articulate precisely what I'd mean by that.
Dec
15
comment Is Christianity functionally polytheistic?
Well, I certainly have seen Christians describing the hate-filled vengeful God of the Left Behind books as "not the God I worship".
Dec
15
comment Is Christianity functionally polytheistic?
@rpeg. I'm not convinced that that's a meaningful question. But then, I'm not convinced that "Do Christians and Muslims worship the same God?" is a meaningful question. This is just the same basic question on a smaller scale. Are there many versions of the Christian God? Yes. Yes there are. Does that lead anywhere interesting? No, not really.
Dec
15
comment Unfulfilled prophecies?
@MasonWheeler. The 2 Timothy passage is a perfect snapshot of every day. As prophecy, it's fairly useless.
Dec
15
comment Does the diversity in doctrines among Christian traditions indicate that there are multiple “truths”?
As to, "only one is correct", I wouldn't assume even that. At most one is correct. Of course, some differences matter more than others, but you'd be hard pressed to find agreement even on which differences are the most important.
Dec
15
comment Is Christianity functionally polytheistic?
If you could find one person who was a member of many denominations which held mutually contradictory beliefs ... I still wouldn't necessarily call this person a polytheist, but at least your question would make sense. As stated, the question does not make sense. At all.
Dec
5
revised How do Creationist Christians respond to the evidence for Evolution?
Title fix
Dec
2
comment Inconsistency in Biblical interpreatation (Genesis & Judges)
@Richard. I am asking about those two passages. The Sodom story is constantly referenced in unhinged diatribes on homosexuality; so what's the difference between that and the variant myth in Judges?
Nov
29
accepted Inconsistency in Biblical interpreatation (Genesis & Judges)
Nov
29
accepted Do Jehovah's Witnesses use different language for theological reasons?
Nov
25
comment Inconsistency in Biblical interpreatation (Genesis & Judges)
@Caleb. Would it help if I found and added to the original question examples of prominent Christians (not just random people on messageboards) making a connection between the Sodom story and homosexuality? People do say this, and I would like to understand it.
Nov
25
comment Inconsistency in Biblical interpreatation (Genesis & Judges)
@Caleb. Yes ... but. Maybe I'm asking more of a sociological question than a theological one. But the belief I'm talking about is hardly uncommon, and is certainly part of Christianity as defined on this site.
Nov
25
comment Inconsistency in Biblical interpreatation (Genesis & Judges)
I suspect that depends on your definition of "Christian apologist". I see that story used all the time. Perhaps not by theologians, but I'm more interested in Christianity as it exists in the real world than I am in the rarefied musings of theologians.
Nov
25
asked Inconsistency in Biblical interpreatation (Genesis & Judges)
Nov
21
comment Why are the first five books of the old testament named differently in some translations?
The same in Polish (and I think other Slavic languages, but that's a guess), but not in Greek. They're the only non-English languages in my family background.
Nov
17
comment Should “Jesus” be rendered “Yeshu‘a” in English?
The World English Bible: Messianic Edition (also known as the Hebrew Names Version) renders the name as Yeshua. Yochanan 1:17
Nov
17
comment Should “Jesus” be rendered “Yeshu‘a” in English?
@DJClayworth. Jehovah's Witnesses consider it important to address God by name, but the name itself they don't consider important. They use Jehovah for exactly the same reason they (and everyone else) use Jesus: that's the traditional rendering in English.
Nov
17
comment What is the basis for Christian disapproval of creation of artificial life?
The problem with this question is that it may have many equally valid answers. That's why questions here need some sort of scoping, usually by denomination and/or "doctrinal tradition". I can't help you to scope this, but I'm sure someone can.
Nov
17
comment Should “Jesus” be rendered “Yeshu‘a” in English?
Your side note is not entirely accurate.