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Jan
22
comment Why does Genesis record only 10 names from Adam to Noah?
@staples I found this: khouse.org/articles/1996/44
Jan
22
comment Was the virgin birth against Jewish customs? And where did Jesus receive his chromosomes from?
To whom was it referring then? No, that just doesn't make sense. Matthew specifically refers to the prophecy of the virgin in connection with Mary. He makes it clear that Mary was a virgin, and then links it to Isaiah 7:14. It cannot be any clearer. You cannot make it mean something other than virgin, just because you want it to. Matthew 1:18-23
Jan
19
comment Was the virgin birth against Jewish customs? And where did Jesus receive his chromosomes from?
God is spirit and therefore had no body until the Incarnation. The other 23 chromosomes were presumably created just like all the matter in the universe was--by divine fiat.
Jan
19
comment Was the virgin birth against Jewish customs? And where did Jesus receive his chromosomes from?
So, Isaiah says, "The Lord is going to give you a sign--a woman is going to have a baby." Some sign.
Jan
16
comment Christ Son of God
Some Jews did believe, of course. Many did not. All the disciples were Jewish. Paul was Jewish. Stephen and many others were also Jewish.
Jan
12
comment Do any Christian groups refer to God as “she”, “it” or “they”? (Or is it always “He”?)
@BrianHitchcock That is a ridiculous statement. What I'm saying is that God existed before the creation of the Universe. He is spiritual--not physical. God did not have a physical body until the incarnation. As such, His masculinity was not defined by any design of a physical body. If gender is merely physical, then God would have to have a physical body to be masculine. It seems, though, that masculinity is not merely physical.
Jan
9
comment Do any Christian groups refer to God as “she”, “it” or “they”? (Or is it always “He”?)
A key point is that the Bible refers to God as "He" and never "She". This applies to the Father, Son and Spirit. True Christianity has always run counter to secular philosophies, and it always will. It should not be changed to accommodate non-Christian biases. It is not ours to tell God what gender He is. It should be noted, though, that God's masculinity is not biological. The Son did become a Man biologically, but even the Son's masculinity was before His incarnation.
Dec
31
comment What is the physical evidence for a global flood?
A local flood does not fit the narrative. Why would God ask Noah to build such a large boat and gather up so many animals? Why not just tell him to go on vacation for a few weeks? Otherwise, it would be a whole lot of wasted effort. Thus, if it were a local flood, then the account of Noah is completely absurd. If, however, he did build a boat and gather all the animals, then the idea of a local flood is completely absurd.
Dec
8
comment Is Jesus' statement that Satan is the father of the Jews anti-Jewish?
@gideonmarx How were the Jews supposed to know Jesus was God, the eternal Son? Well, perhaps their theology was incomplete, was to know Jesus was the Messiah and God in the flesh was well prophesied. Jesus also affirmed that if they loved God, they would love Him as well. So, evidence was not the issue. They rejected Moses and the prophets as well, so rejecting Jesus was par for the course, despite the evidence.
Dec
3
comment When did the practice of bringing non-believers to church originate?
@Zenon Yes, but the purpose is not to show them how cool we are. That was in the original question.
Dec
2
comment When did the practice of bringing non-believers to church originate?
I've never heard of this practice. However, Christians do allow people to see the hope we have and give others an answer for that. A relationship with Jesus does bring hope and healing and forgiveness. We never point people to ourselves--only to Christ.
Nov
20
comment Under what circumstances is disobeying a bad law justified or even obligatory?
Allowance is not given to violate "bad" laws--only "immoral" ones.
Nov
12
comment In the Gospels, is there any recorded instance of the Pharisees quoting Scripture?
Just that in the Matthew passage, it references "chief priests and scribes" without distinguishing whether they were Pharisees or Sadduccees, so that may very well have included both.
Nov
10
comment How do creationists explain the geologic column?
As usual the "evidence" of the geologic column for evolution has been severely contorted: icr.org/article/ten-misconceptions-about-geologic-column
Oct
31
comment How did the Brownists/Calvinists justify capital punishment for witches?
This is really a duplicate of a much broader question regarding which Old Testament Laws are binding. The Law of Moses applied 1) to the Jewish nation, 2) for a certain period of time. In Ezekiel, God spoke of a new covenant. This came through Jesus. Therefore, there is no justification for imposing Old Testament law intended for the Jewish nation at a particular point in history to Christians who are part of the new covenant.
Oct
31
comment How did the Brownists/Calvinists justify capital punishment for witches?
possible duplicate of Do we have to obey the laws of the bible? If so, what laws?
Oct
29
comment Book recommendation that goes over how the bible is compiled based on manuscripts
It's important to understand that verses from the KJV were never removed. There are some Greek manuscripts that have the verses, and some that do not. So, either some explanatory phrases crept INTO some manuscripts OR some phrases crept OUT. Wikipedia has a summary of the major variants, which is pretty good actually. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… They also have a much more comprehensive list: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
Oct
27
comment Why do Protestants say: “In Jesus' name. Amen.”, whereas Catholics say: “In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.”?
@Geremia I personally seldom repeat the Lord's prayer, as I believe it is to be a pattern, not a repetition. I most often pray directly to the Father. I rarely, if ever, address the Holy Spirit directly, except in songs. I do address Jesus personally, but less frequently than the Father.
Oct
27
comment Why do Protestants say: “In Jesus' name. Amen.”, whereas Catholics say: “In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.”?
@Geremia No, we typically pray TO the Father (like the Lord's Prayer) in the NAME of Jesus.
Oct
24
comment What happens if someone who is not elect tries to seek God?
It is an impossibility in reformed theology.