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Nov
6
comment How do Catholic apologists explain the cross to a Muslim?
@Nathaniel: It's a question, in part, of teaching style. I doubt there's anything within Catholic doctrine which demands which teaching style is used by missionaries. There is doctrine about the cross, but that's not specific to missionaries. I suspect the closest you'll get to an official Catholic "rule" about how to teach the cross to Muslims is "teach the Catholic doctrine." But that's not what the OP wants to know... they want to know how to present this doctrine.
Nov
6
comment How do Catholic apologists explain the cross to a Muslim?
There are as many approaches to this as there are missionaries. And we aren't in a position to tell you which is best. Although I think it's a good question, I don't think it's a good fit for our site.
Nov
4
comment If a Pope does something wrong, or less than ideal, who is he representing?
A long, interesting, but tangential, history lesson before an answer to the question in the very last sentence. But do you have a source for the answer?
Nov
3
comment Immortal soul concept: afterlife and the sentence spoken to Adam
I don't know if that helps at all or not. But it seems that the core of this question is "What does 'death' mean?" so I hope in that sense my comment helps.
Nov
3
comment Immortal soul concept: afterlife and the sentence spoken to Adam
I won't make this an answer, because I think the question is too broad, but "death" often means "separation." Physical death is the separation of the spirit/soul/breath/consciousness/whatever, from the body. Spiritual death is often said to be the separation of the human spirit from the spirit of God. This is not a Christian sense or "in God's eyes" understanding, but simply a way of referring to spiritual separation (of something/someone). It is in a similar way one speaks of another being "dead to me."
Nov
1
comment I am a free will baptist ordained minister, and I want to join a baptist church, do I need to be ordained again?
@curiousdannii: Why do I get the feeling you're arguing just for the sake of it?
Nov
1
comment I am a free will baptist ordained minister, and I want to join a baptist church, do I need to be ordained again?
@curiosdannii,that would be a good question... A much better question, in fact. But it's not the one that was asked, so it's not the one I answered.
Nov
1
comment According to Catholics were Adam and Eve aware that they possessed immortal souls before Satan told Eve that she would not die?
@MattGutting: Well, one could come up with something called "evolution" that allowed for a literal Adam and Eve, but according to modern scientific theory, the concept of only two human ancestors to all humanity is an impossibility. And since Catholicism allows for this interpretation, the rest of my point stands, irrespective of any pseudo-scientific "evolutionary" theories which permit a literal Adam and Eve.
Oct
31
comment According to Catholics were Adam and Eve aware that they possessed immortal souls before Satan told Eve that she would not die?
@Geremia: Evolution is incompatible with a literal Adam and Eve. So if the Catholic church accepts evolution as a possibility, that means they also do not demand that Adam and Eve are real, so any questions about "How does the Catholic church explain X about Adam and Eve?" can't have a definite answer.
Oct
31
comment According to Catholics were Adam and Eve aware that they possessed immortal souls before Satan told Eve that she would not die?
As far as I know, the Catholic church has no official answer to that question. Multiple Popes have acknowledged that the theory of evolution does not conflict with Catholic doctrine. See here for more.
Oct
31
comment Do Orthodox Christians believe that God wants a personal relationship with the individual?
I can't tell if this is answering for "orthodoxy" or "Orthodoxy." In any case, it's cryptic and vague, and doesn't seem to make for a very good answer.
Oct
31
comment According to Catholics were Adam and Eve aware that they possessed immortal souls before Satan told Eve that she would not die?
I don't think Catholic dogma asserts that Adam and Eve were even literal human beings, so I don't think this question can be answered as it is written.
Oct
30
comment What is the biblical basis against the idea that Jesus descended into hell?
Isn't the strongest Biblical argument against Jesus' descent into hell the simple lack of evidence for it? (Kind of like the evidence against practically any negative idea?)
Oct
30
comment Did St. Francis pray the Rosary?
+1 for historical accuracy in a child's costume! Now if only Hollywood would learn to do the same type of homework... :P
Oct
29
comment What percentage of Christendom takes early Genesis in a literal sense?
The survey also doesn't clarify what it means by "creationism", so it's difficult to know if it aligns perfectly with the OP's question, but it's probably safe to assume it's close.
Oct
29
comment What percentage of Christendom takes early Genesis in a literal sense?
It's important to note that this only addresses the US. In the rest of the world, creationism isn't much of a thing.
Oct
29
comment What percentage of Christendom takes early Genesis in a literal sense?
@curiousdannii: I'm not sure why you think that's wrong, but most people consider that literalism. But whatever your semantic ax you're trying to grind, I don't think it belongs in comments here. The question makes it clear what is being asked, so your comments aren't serving to clarify the question.
Oct
29
comment What percentage of Christendom takes early Genesis in a literal sense?
@curiousdannii: Huh? Are we reading the same question? what percentage of Christendom takes early Genesis absolutely literally (six-day creation within the last 10,000 years, Noah's global flood, Adam and Eve as the first humans, etc.) That pretty clearly spells out what the OP means.
Oct
29
comment What percentage of Christendom takes early Genesis in a literal sense?
@Steve: Interesting find, but it's just for the US. If the number is 10% in the US, it's probably well under 1% world-wide. That also seems to be 10% of Americans, not 10% of Christians, which would mean a much higher percentage of US Christians believe that.
Oct
29
comment What percentage of Christendom takes early Genesis in a literal sense?
@curiousdannii: The question makes it specifically clear what the OP means by "literal".