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Aug
4
comment How do Old Earth Creationists use 2 Peter 3:8 to support the “day-age” theory?
@fredsbend: heh, of course, that's very true.
Aug
4
comment What does it mean that God's wrath is infinite and what is its relation to existence of life on other planets?
@CoderInNetwork: I haven't watched the show, although I'm downloading it now via torrent. I've heard it's good anyway... after I see that episode, maybe I can provide better insight into what they were talking about. Do you by chance remember which episode it was?
Aug
4
comment What does it mean that God's wrath is infinite and what is its relation to existence of life on other planets?
@CoderInNetwork: It does mention it. It says scholars emphasize that Bruno's astronomical views were at most a minor component of the theological and philosophical beliefs that led to his trial. So the idea that he was sentenced because his belief violated the fact that 'God's wrath is not eternal' is probably an embellishment.
Aug
4
comment How do Old Earth Creationists use 2 Peter 3:8 to support the “day-age” theory?
@LCIII: Well, most OECs are not well studied, and they might not look at the scripture as critically as you or I. But to be fair, most YECs aren't well studied, either. So perhaps some OECs do use that verse the way you describe, but it's not a very solid proof text, as I think we both agree.
Aug
4
comment What contemporary criticism was given to Belloc's claim that the Protestant Reformation was the work of a few oligarchs?
Was the Protestant Reformation a bottom-up or top-down reformation -- I'm pretty sure the answer to this question is simply: Yes. It's far too complex a scenario to pigeon-hole into either view. Both views are applicable to some aspects, and other aspects of the reformation wouldn't fit into either view.
Aug
4
comment How do Old Earth Creationists use 2 Peter 3:8 to support the “day-age” theory?
I have edited your question to no longer say "The proper exegesis..." which I think is the most provocative part of the question. If you disagree with the edit, feel free to roll-back my change.
Aug
4
comment How do Old Earth Creationists use 2 Peter 3:8 to support the “day-age” theory?
@LCIII: If you google for "2 Peter 3:8 creation" you get a ton of YEC groups debunking the supposed OEC view that 2 Peter 3:8 supports an old earth view. That's what I mean by it's used by YECs--It's used often as a straw man.
Aug
4
comment How do Old Earth Creationists use 2 Peter 3:8 to support the “day-age” theory?
@Andrew: But that's not what was being done. The question was "How does group X explain Y? Y can't possibly be correct because of Z."
Aug
4
comment How do Old Earth Creationists use 2 Peter 3:8 to support the “day-age” theory?
@LCIII: I think 2 Peter 3:8 is a popular go-to verse to debunk OEC, but not one used to support it (as you see in my answer). In any case, I suggest removing the provocative language from your question.
Aug
4
comment How do Old Earth Creationists use 2 Peter 3:8 to support the “day-age” theory?
Some YECs use those verses, too, to say the days were 1000 years long, but no longer, so that creation took 6,000 years. I think it's a minority YEC view, but it is (or has been) held by some.
Aug
4
comment What is the Orthodox teaching about touching Jesus' body?
This question asks for the Eastern Orthodox view, not the 'orthodox' view, making this Not-an-Answer.
Aug
4
comment Was there doctrinal difference between Lollards and Waldenses?
The differences between the two would be no larger than differences you might see in modern day Baptists and Lutherans and Episcopalians -- There are some pretty vast differences between Baptists, Lutherans, and Episcopalians--to the point that in some cases, one calls the other heretical.
Aug
4
comment In the Seven Gifts of the Holy Spirit, what is the the distinction between the gifts of wisdom, understanding, and knowledge?
Closely related (but taken from a different verse): Difference between wisdom and knowledge in 1 Cor. 12?
Aug
4
comment Are there any documented instances of anyone moving a mountain in faith?
@Wikis: They may not fit your definition of "supernatural miracle," but they would easily fit some definition of supernatural miracle. This is the problem with the question--it depends on subjective definitions.
Aug
4
comment Are there any documented instances of anyone moving a mountain in faith?
I'm also reminded of a (almost certainly fictional) story of a young bed-bound girl, who sat all day in shadow, due to a mountain blocking the sun from her window. She prayed for God to move the mountain, and a construction company shortly thereafter graded the mountain for some construction project, thereby answering the little girl's prayer. The fact that the story is fiction doesn't change the fact that a manually moved mountain wouldn't be a miracle depending on one's perspective.
Aug
4
comment Are there any documented instances of anyone moving a mountain in faith?
@Wikis: But regardless, a land-slide, earth quake, or other natural event that moves a mountain could also be easily seen as miraculous, if one had been praying/hoping for the mountain to move.
Aug
4
comment Are there any documented instances of anyone moving a mountain in faith?
@Wikis: If I dynamite a mountain, it's because I have faith it will work. :) As a Christian, if I start a company to mine minerals from a mountain, and put my faith in God that the company will be successful, then God provides me with dynamite, I could also say I moved the mountain by faith in God. And one could also see that as a genuine miracle--especially if the odds of starting such a business, getting permits, etc, were especially unfavorable.
Aug
4
comment Are there any documented instances of anyone moving a mountain in faith?
Given our new site guidelines, I have VtCed this question as "primarily opinion based." Mountains have been moved, by way of explosives, manual labor, weather events, and tectonic movements. Whether any of this counts as "by faith" is entirely up to ones' interpretation and definition of "faith" and/or "miracle" making the question entirely subjective.
Aug
4
comment Do non-Catholic traditions ever have family altars?
The question has now been updated with firm examples proving that Catholics do indeed have altars in their homes--or at least they claim they do! If your point is that they are using the term 'altar' incorrectly, that could be mentioned as a comment to the question, but this in no way answers the question.
Aug
4
comment Do non-Catholic traditions ever have family altars?
@svidgen: Many Catholics (especially in Latin America) also have shrines in their homes, dedicated to a specific saint. I'm not sure if this is the same thing you're talking about when you say "prayer nook." See an example here. Calling it an altar may be inaccurate, but not surprising, considering the practice of placing candles, flowers, etc on the shrines in honor to the saint it honors.