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Aug
7
comment Prominent Theologians' answer to: What is “The Parable of the Shrewd Manager” about?
I think there are two possible approaches to this question. One is to pull out a specific key phrase, and ask what the original language was saying--this type of question is would probably fit better on BH. The other is to ask what a specific tradition says about the meaning of the parable--which is probably a close proxy for what you're asking. If you were to ask what Catholic theologians say, for instance, you'd probably get a pretty good answer that would also be applicable to many other traditions. If you want to know what Matthew Henry said, why not just google for his commentary on it?
Aug
7
comment Prominent Theologians' answer to: What is “The Parable of the Shrewd Manager” about?
I don't think the current edit really helps... 1) It's still a list/survey question, and 2) who defines "prominent theologian"? It's a relative term that could potentially mean anyone with a blog.
Aug
7
comment Did Mary have other children?
This needs additional context to be a fit for this site according to modern standards. Specifically, is a Catholic perspective sought, or a protestant one?
Aug
7
comment Why shouldn't we swear or curse- LDS
(cont'd) There are clearly verses (such as Matthew 5:36) which say swearing, in the traditional sense, is wrong. But due to the language overlap between these three concepts, I believe it's often said, or at least assumed, that all three are morally wrong. A good answer ought to address all three concepts separately.
Aug
7
comment Why shouldn't we swear or curse- LDS
Part of the problem with this question is that it's confusing terms. Swearing, cursing, and vulgarities are (traditionally) three distinct concepts, but are commonly all referred to as 'swearing' in modern language. Swearing, traditionally, is making an oath, and is typically considered sinful only when the oath is made lightly (ex. Matthew 5:36). Cursing is a wishful statement of ill will to someone ("May a thousand bees fly up your nose!") and vulgarity is a very local, social concept, and simply involves using "rude words," and is often not considered "sinful," but simply "rude."
Aug
6
comment Why shouldn't we swear or curse- LDS
@LCIII: The question is asking Why it's a sin from an LDS perspective. I think on topic. There should be a clear cut answer for why the LDS church says so.
Aug
6
comment What is the source DNA for the body of Jesus?
Yes, thank you. :)
Aug
6
comment By what did Jesus call Joseph?
@AndreasBlass: I would be surprised if Jewish law made provisions for immaculate conceptions. Whether Jesus' would have been found, in court, to be a bastard child or the son of Joseph can only be answered by speculation, but it's obvious that from a social standpoint, Joseph was accepted as Jesus' father.
Aug
6
comment Is there a Christian definition of “social justice?”
If you were to narrow the focus of the question to a specific denomination, it may be possible to provide an answer. Otherwise, the question is either too broad or primarily opinion based, I'm afraid.
Aug
6
comment Is there a Christian definition of “social justice?”
@MattGutting: I'm not arguing with the strict meaning of your statement (that it could be possible to have a common definition but different applications), I'm only arguing that that's clearly not the actual case.
Aug
6
comment What is the source DNA for the body of Jesus?
@Bye: I don't see an answer there. Maybe it exists, but it would help me, and I suspect the OP, if you spell out what answer you think is evident there.
Aug
5
comment By what did Jesus call Joseph?
@Zoe: Joseph was technically Jesus' stepfather. It's quite common to call a stepfather "father."
Aug
5
comment Is there a Christian definition of “social justice?”
@MattGutting: For instance, the Westboro Baptist Church seems to think that social justice is best served by picketing funerals and waving hate posters. Most other Christian groups would think that is the antithesis of social justice. I don't think it's a simple matter of different applications of the same principle of justice.
Aug
5
comment What is the source DNA for the body of Jesus?
@Bye: It seems to address it more closely... but I think it's still missing the main point of the question. Where did Jesus get his DNA? From Mary alone? From Mary + God? Or from Mary + some other man?
Aug
5
comment Is there a Christian definition of “social justice?”
There is clearly not a standard Christian definition, when you consider many Christian groups oppose each other on social justice issues.
Aug
5
comment By what did Jesus call Joseph?
I don't think this question is "primarily opinion based"... although I think any answers will be!
Aug
5
comment What is the source DNA for the body of Jesus?
@Bye: That doesn't address the question, though, which asks specifically if his DNA is 1) 100% identical to Mary, 2) 100% unique (not borrowed from Mary at all), or 3) 50% from Mary, 50% from a human male. The question seems to assume that his DNA is 100% human--it just wants to know from WHICH human(s) did it come.
Aug
5
comment What is the source DNA for the body of Jesus?
@Loduwijk: What I'm saying is that I don't see this answer addressing the issue of DNA at all, but more about the essence of Jesus. I think #1 is a reasonable answer to the question--I just don't see that answer presented here.
Aug
5
comment What is the source DNA for the body of Jesus?
So your answer is... Jesus' DNA was 100% identical to Mary's DNA? I really don't see how this answers the question.
Aug
5
comment What is the source DNA for the body of Jesus?
But Kudos on a well-formulated, thoughtful question. And +1 for actually searching the site before asking!