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Jan
4
comment How do evangelical universalists reconcile their position with the designation for Judas that it would be better if he had never been born?
@Mr.Bultitude: Would you mind sharing that definition? Even the opening sentence on wikipedia offers two different definitions, before it even gets to details. And each is open to wide interpretation. I'm not being pedantic at all. "Inerrant" is not at all well defined, at least for the purpose of scoping a question like this one. I'll grant you that the concept of inerrancy is not so hard to define, but what that looks like is very difficult, if not completely impossible, to define. Thus, question scope, it requires clarification.
Jan
4
comment How do evangelical universalists reconcile their position with the designation for Judas that it would be better if he had never been born?
@BenMordecai: I appreciate what that you're trying to scope the question appropriately. It's a difficult thing to do some times. I'm not sure that "evangelical" is any more clear than "inerrant." Many proponents of inerrant scripture are Evangelical, many aren't. And many Evangelicals are proponents of inerrant scripture, many aren't. They're two distinct (and undefined) groups, with overlap, but neither is necessarily more specific than the other.
Jan
3
comment How do those who believe in a works or works + faith based salvation interpret Jesus' words to the criminal in Luke 23:43?
@DJClayworth: There are many denominations that say works are an essential component of salvation. Catholicism is probably the largest example, but I know there are many others, not least those which demand baptism for salvation. I'm not aware of any Christian denomination which claims a works-only salvation, although there are some which come close--at least according to opponents (the Word of Faith movement comes to mind).
Jan
3
comment How do evangelical universalists reconcile their position with the designation for Judas that it would be better if he had never been born?
@BenMordecai: "Inerrant" is a very loaded word, which means many different things to many different people. If that is central to your question, you probably need to define it for the purpose of your question.
Jan
3
comment How do evangelical universalists reconcile their position with the designation for Judas that it would be better if he had never been born?
@BenMordecai: Sounds like a pretty fringe group of people (person?). At least it makes for a narrow scope for the question!
Jan
3
comment How close is the English word “father” compared to the original word used by Jesus in the Lord's Prayer?
This is clearly a linguistics question. It has a relevance to Christian study, granted, but it is entirely about the translation and definitions of ancient words. These areas of study do inform and influence Christianity, but they are done by linguist and historians, not by theologians, and thus the proper place to ask this level of question is of experts in these areas, which would be Linguistics.SE or English.SE. In the same way, questions about how archaeology is conducted belong on an Archaeology site, even if the conclusions of that archaeology are relevant to Christianity.
Jan
3
comment How do evangelical universalists reconcile their position with the designation for Judas that it would be better if he had never been born?
"evangelical universalist" sounds a lot like an oxymoron to me.
Jan
2
comment Generational Curses vs Personal Resposibility
This is opinion based unless you can scope it to a specific denomination or belief system. You could also approach it from more of a hermeneutics angle, and ask on BH what each verse means.
Jan
2
comment How close is the English word “father” compared to the original word used by Jesus in the Lord's Prayer?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about the English language
Dec
31
comment Positional and Relational Forgiveness, what is the Biblical Basis?
If you also want a case against that view, that could make for a good second question.
Dec
31
comment Positional and Relational Forgiveness, what is the Biblical Basis?
I would suggest asking simply, "What is the Biblical basis for the two concepts of forgiveness?" If you want to add "From an OSAS perspective" that would be fine. But then you avoid the ineitable clash of opinions between those who see it is Biblical, and those who don't.
Dec
31
comment Positional and Relational Forgiveness, what is the Biblical Basis?
If it's possible to have more than one answer to a question, it's not a good question for SE.
Dec
31
comment Positional and Relational Forgiveness, what is the Biblical Basis?
I'm not certain that OSAS is a sufficiently narrow scope to answer this question. I can imagine multiple answers from within that framework.
Dec
31
comment From where did Jesus draw the notion of salt losing its saltiness, for his usage “You are the salt of the earth”
It's not entirely sure what you're asking. 1) Why did Jesus use that metaphor? That's off-topic, as motivations are off-topic. 2) What does the metaphor mean? This may be answerable, if scoped sufficiently (Catholic teaching might be sufficient). 3) Does the Catholic church have any teachings on this parable? Undoubtedly too-broad, as they would naturally have many. 4) Something else...?
Dec
29
comment According to Evangelicals, who now has the authority to bind and loose (per Matt. 18:18)?
@H3br3wHamm3r81: SE is community-moderated. Everyone here is a mod. These comments are the core of community moderation. It seems you're complaining about the process working properly.
Dec
29
comment According to Evangelicals, who now has the authority to bind and loose (per Matt. 18:18)?
@H3br3wHamm3r81: The other question is about *who was Jesus referring to when he said these things, including the phrase about binding and loosing." Your question is a clear subset, asking "Who has the authority to bind and loose?" There may still be room for further elaboration, though. Which is why I haven't VtCed as a duplicate, although I can see that case.
Dec
29
comment How do Protestants interpret Matthew 16:13–20?
Isn't this a bit of a straw man? Catholics don't claim a blood lineage for the Papacy, either.
Dec
28
comment According to Evangelicals, who now has the authority to bind and loose (per Matt. 18:18)?
Evangelicalism is a subset of Protestantism, so a suitable answer to the Protestantism question should answer this one. Is there some aspect of the other answer that you think needs a different answer from an evangelical perspective?
Dec
24
comment What arguments have been advanced against “Angel Therapy”?
Thanks for the edit, @ThaddeusB, to keep the question on-topic :)
Dec
23
comment What's the difference between Actual Grace and Karma?
Maybe you would want to pre-empt any such comments by linking to one question you think answers that especially well?