12,095 reputation
344138
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age 34
visits member for 3 years
seen 41 mins ago

I'm a full-time software developer for eFolder, Inc, working remotely. I from Wichita, KS but have been traveling the globe since June, 2013.

I am pro-tem moderator for Spanish Language.


5h
comment Is Lucid Dreaming a sin?
We don't do opinions, and we don't answer 'Is X a sin?' questions here.
8h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
The Case for Christ and the (old) Evidence that Demands a Verdict.
8h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@topomorto: (cont'd) ... you should really consider reading historians' accounts. McDowell and Strobel, while I believe they consider historical accounts fairly, are not historians. You might consider something by NT Wright. For instance I'm currently reading The New Testament and the People of God, which is volume 1 of 5 (or is it now going to be 6?) in his life's work on the history and theology of Jesus and Paul.
8h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@topomorto: Josh McDowell's story is a common one: An atheist who sought to disprove Christianity, and in the process, became a Christian. (Of course the other happens, too--Christians who seek to prove Christianity and become atheists). I have not read the book mentioned, but I have read his other book "Evidence that Demands a Verdict." Lee Strobel's "The Case for Christ" is another book in a similar vein, but a little less academic, more targeted for seekers. Between the two, I would suggest that McDowell is more what you are looking for. But if you are serious about a study like this...
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
I offered you a very clear explanation for why your question is both too subjective and too broad for us to address it here, and I offered specific advice on how to scope the question appropriately. If you would rather argue about it (which seems evident from both the tone of your question, as well as your follow up comments), then I won't waste any more time trying to rescue your question from certain closure.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@topomorto: Yes, the gospels were written after the events they described. That doesn't make them any less historical. All historical accounts are written after the events they describe.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@topomorto: I would tell them to start by reading the gospels. Then I would tell them to follow up by reading any of the countless books about the gospels in a historical context.
17h
comment Is there anyone (A.D.) in the Bible who could be considered to have found God other than through Christ?
@topomorto: Christians (generally) say that salvation is only possible through Christ. This is even true BC--their salvation was only possible through Christ, even though they did not yet know of Christ. But that is obviously a different concept than "finding God" (according to the way you seem to be describing it). So based on that, and your latest comment, it sounds as though your question is based on a confused understanding of Christian theology, and therefore not really a "valid" question.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
Incidentally, probably the strongest evidence for the historicity of the gospels as a whole are a) the existence of the modern church, b) the gospel manuscripts themselves. But something tells me that's not the kind of answer you're looking for.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@topomorto: No, you're absolutely right that enumerating every event in the gospels is ridiculous. That's precisely why this question is unanswerable as it is worded. I encourage you to choose one event which you think is meaningful, or of which you are skeptical, then ask for evidence of that.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
I applaud your effort to edit the question to make it more narrow, but you've also made it more subjective, as what is "theologically significant" is a matter of opinion. Please consider asking about specific evidence.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@topomorto: If you want your question to stand a chance here, you might ask about evidence for something very specific. "Is there evidence that Jesus was born in Bethlehem?" "Is there evidence that Jesus was crucified?" "Is there evidence that Jesus had 12 disciples?" etc.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@topomorto: Try narrowing your question to a realm of possibility. Spend a moment considering what you're actually asking, and you'll see that this question is completely ridiculous. The temple ruins still exist in Jareusalem. That's pretty strong evidence for the temple existing, which is mentioned in the gospels. The Roman empire has TONS of evidence supporting its existence. The test for "strongest evidence" simply becomes a question of "Which absolutely insanely overwhelming evidence is more absolutely insanely overwhelming?"
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
@Anonymous: 1) "Strongest evidence" is a subjective term. 2) "Strongest evidence...for any element" is impossibly broad.
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
Your question is literally asking for the strongest evidence to corroborate any element of the gospel narrative... so like, evidence that the Roman empire existed?
17h
comment Strongest evidence for the historicity of theologically-important elements of the gospel narrative?
There are literally hundreds, if not thousands, of books on this topic. Do you think you could try making your question a little more specific?
17h
comment Which denominations teach of a resurrection on Earth?
@Bye: It does, yes.
18h
comment Which denominations teach of a resurrection on Earth?
@Bye: You've presented the Biblical case for a physical resurrection, which is valuable, but doesn't directly answer the question. You could add that "all Christians believe in a physical resurrection," which seems to be what you're trying to say, but that's not accurate. Many Christians believe that heaven will be "purely spiritual" (I don't agree with them). If you google for "spiritual bodies in heaven" you will find many examples.
1d
comment I'm told my child needs to see a shrink, because she has demons inside her. please read my story and see if anyone can help!
I'm sorry, we don't offer pastoral advice here. Please consult with your local pastor or a trusted Christian counselor.
1d
comment Why didn't God reveal all the answers to life?
@MattGutting: Well, it is, as of now, an unanswered question to the OP! :)