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seen 6 hours ago

I'm a full-time software developer for eFolder, Inc, working remotely. I from Wichita, KS but have been traveling the globe since June, 2013.

I am pro-tem moderator for Spanish Language.


6h
comment Genesis's Order of Events: Is there Unanimous Consent Among the Fathers?
@Geremia: We can't. That's one of the problems with this question.
6h
comment Genesis's Order of Events: Is there Unanimous Consent Among the Fathers?
@Geremia: I'm sure they did have opinions.
13h
comment Genesis's Order of Events: Is there Unanimous Consent Among the Fathers?
This question is impossible to answer, because most church "fathers" never told us what they believed about this. For instance, I'm pretty sure that Saint Peter never wrote about this, and he would have been considered the church father by many (specifically Catholics). There are those who argue that Saint Paul wrote about this, although there is a lot of disagreement even on that.
2d
comment What was the early American church like?
I think this question is far too broad. The late 17th to early 18th century America is, literally, a 100-year timespan, and you're asking about the church in an incredibly religiously diverse, and very large nation. One could write tomes on the topic. Can you make the question more specific somehow?
2d
comment Does the Bible prohibit women from having any position of power over men?
@Bye: I don't see Jesus' words about Cesar as directly "separating" religion and government, but rather as direction of how a Christ-follower ought to respond to governmental authority. The instruction to "go the extra mile" is another example, and was a very politically-loaded instruction at the time. But I agree with your broader point that scripture clearly addresses issues beyond religion and family.
2d
comment Does the Bible prohibit women from having any position of power over men?
@Zoe: The Bible mentions female pastors. Most would consider that a "leadership position."
2d
comment What is the Biblical basis that God does not punish disobedient Christians beyond the immediate natural consequences?
There is clearly Biblical evidence that God has done so. Whether there's a direct statement that he will continue to do so in present times, I'm not certain. so I think it's a good question.
2d
comment What is the Biblical basis that God does not punish disobedient Christians beyond the immediate natural consequences?
Ahh, yes, as you guessed, that's just because I mentioned it in a comment :)
2d
comment What is the Biblical basis that God does not punish disobedient Christians beyond the immediate natural consequences?
What do you mean they are linked?
Aug
29
comment What is the Biblical basis that God does not punish disobedient Christians beyond the immediate natural consequences?
Is this meant to be the counter-point to your other question?
Aug
29
comment Is the sermon on the mount intended for unbelievers?
@fredsbend: Put another way, I can see three possible answers to the question: "Yes, it was meant for unbelievers as you say", "No, it was meant for believers because..." and "It was meant for both believers and unbelievers because..." Which is correct is a matter of opinion. (I happen to believe it was meant for both... but that's only my opinion).
Aug
29
comment Is the sermon on the mount intended for unbelievers?
@fredsbend: If it's not a truth question, it's primarily-opinion based as it's worded (and of course Truth questions are a subset of primarily-opinion based) That's not to say a good, solid question doesn't exit in there somewhere...
Aug
29
comment Is the sermon on the mount intended for unbelievers?
This is a Truth question, making it off-topic here. You could possibly ask "Was Jesus addressing believers or non-believers?" and then it would be on-topic, but the answer would depend on your definition of "believer"--he was addressing Jews, as he was in Israel, but not Christians, as they did not yet exist.
Aug
29
comment What is the Authoritative Catholic explanation of why the Magi get a pass, yet Catholics are to reject astrology?
@FMShyanguya: There are many instances of Bible characters doing things which are obviously, or possibly, "evil," without being condemned. Also keep in mind that astrology of the time has diverged into two distinct modern arts: Astrology and Astronomy.
Aug
29
comment What is the Authoritative Catholic explanation of why the Magi get a pass, yet Catholics are to reject astrology?
@FMShyanguya: The Bible is full of stories of people accomplishing God's will through sinful means.
Aug
29
comment What is the Authoritative Catholic explanation of why the Magi get a pass, yet Catholics are to reject astrology?
@FMShyanguya: Yes, but that's not an indication that the Catholic church (nor anyone else) approves of them using astrology for that purpose.
Aug
29
comment What is the Authoritative Catholic explanation of why the Magi get a pass, yet Catholics are to reject astrology?
@FMShyanguya: I apologize for saying your question assumes that... it actually directly states it when it says the Magi "get a pass."
Aug
29
comment What is the Authoritative Catholic explanation of why the Magi get a pass, yet Catholics are to reject astrology?
This question assumes that Catholics find the Magi's use of astrology to be "acceptable." Do you have evidence of this?
Aug
29
comment How to reconcile God's promise to Abraham with the current Jewish population?
@Calvin: Even if that is the case, this question doesn't address that case, as this question simply asks "How can this be reconciled?" and the obvious answer is "It's not literal." If the question were "How do Biblical literalists who take this verse literally reconcile this?" it would be a different story.
Aug
29
comment How to reconcile God's promise to Abraham with the current Jewish population?
@Calvin: Biblical "literalists" are the first to say that they don't take everything literally. I'd be curious to know of a specific group that actually believes this verse is meant to be taken literally.