141 reputation
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bio website JonathansCorner.com
location Chicago, IL
age 39
visits member for 1 year, 11 months
seen Nov 28 '12 at 23:33
Christos Jonathan Seth Hayward was born in 1975 in Riverside, California and had a childhood filled with curiosity and exploration. In eighth grade, he ranked 7th in the U.S. in the 1989 MathCounts competition, programmed a four dimensional maze, and did an independent study of calculus. This mathematical fascination prepared the way, over time, to ongoing explorations in other areas. These other explorations would feed into his work as an author on the web.

Hayward entered high school in 1989 at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy. There he continued in mathematics while pursuing a breadth of other interests. These interests laid broad and deep foundations for his later multidisciplinary endeavors on the web. In 1990-92, he administered a student-use social network that effectively provided web 2.0 functionality before the web became widely known. He also participated in, and wrote for, discussions on the social network, continued in French, and pursued more whimsical endeavors such as programming a video game on his calculator. He graduated in absentia in 1992, away in Washington, D.C. for a math contest.

He went on to study at Wheaton as a National Merit Scholar majoring in math in 1992, before transferring in 1994 to Calvin. Outside of class time at these two schools, he continued with interests that would come to have surprising connections and bear fruit in his later writing. He read the Bible at length, began working on the web, and started to write works that would be published on his main site. During his studies at Calvin, he earned an advanced certificate from the Sorbonne in 1995 before graduating from Calvin in 1996.

He began his post-graduate education at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1996. He earned his M.S. in applied math in 1998 with a computational science and engineering option and being the first person to graduate with the new master's thesis option. During that time, he began to explore other languages besides French and English. He passed a proficiency test to opt out of a year's German coursework within two weeks of self-study. (He would go on to study well over a dozen dialects and languages: ancient, medieval, modern, "conlang," computer...) By the time Hayward had finished his first master's, he had already begun his literature site...


Jul
31
comment Is Roman Catholic reconciliation with the Orthodox likely (or possible)?
Ironically, read an Anglican who summarizes and cites Orthodox critiques of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, a tradition which had strong Catholic opposition when it first appeared.
Jul
31
comment Is Roman Catholic reconciliation with the Orthodox likely (or possible)?
Theophilus asked me why in An Open Letter to Orthodoxy and Ecumenism why I state that a Sacred Heart icon in Byzantine attempt is offensive. First, it brings something foreign to Orthodoxy, and once foreign to Catholicism, into what is attempted and presented as Orthodox. It is slightly like one of those songs where adoration of Christ morphs into adoration of Krishna, or telling Catholics they all need to speak in tongues. And secondly, Orthodox are as offended by the Sacred Heart as Catholics originally were.
Jul
31
comment Is Roman Catholic reconciliation with the Orthodox likely (or possible)?
And, perhaps, look into the things Orthodox say about barriers to intercommunion. An Open Letter to Catholics on Orthodoxy and Ecumenism picks two major points where there are at least a dozen serious contenders; the criterion of selection was parsimony. And I might add what one Roman told me: Catholics view philosophy and culture as something that can be changed and updated as times change, while Orthodox view Orthodox philosophy and culture as something that cannot be quickly or drastically changed, in some sense like the flesh of the Incarnation.
Jul
30
awarded  Teacher
Jul
30
awarded  Autobiographer
Jul
30
answered Is Roman Catholic reconciliation with the Orthodox likely (or possible)?