4,419 reputation
616
bio website hartmen.us/todd
location Missouri, USA
age 40
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen 4 hours ago

Christian, dad, and programmer


Aug
13
comment Is there a scriptural example of a non-believer speaking on God's behalf?
God refers to some foreign nations as "servants" (Je 25:9; 43:10) and tools/instruments (Is 10), but they are never said to be in closer communion with him. Israel is sometimes condemned for being more idolatrous than her neighbors, but her neighbors are never accused of being anything resembling righteous. Nebuchadnezzar is one potential exception, but he isn't ever compared to Israel. The rest of the answer looks good.
Aug
13
comment Is there a scriptural example of a non-believer speaking on God's behalf?
It's conceivable that each site is managed by different people and that those who manage CM are employed but not completely controlled by the owning/managing entity.
Aug
13
comment If God is all knowing then why didn't he prevent Adam and Eve from sinning?
@FMShyanguya I've added a hint of explanation for the assumed conclusion regarding our goal in existence.
Aug
12
comment What is the case for the actual collection of scriptures, known as the Bible, being true?
@HariZ tradition is what defines the canon (and different traditions have slightly different canons). The New Testament doesn't attest to its own inviolability. In general, modern Christians trust the decisions made by the earlier Christians about what belongs in the canon.
Aug
11
comment Where in God's promises did it show that Abram needed to have a child through Sarai?
It seems at least plausible to think that Abraham could have second-guessed his own understanding of what God told him because of the extended time that had already elapsed since God made the promise (11 years or more). I don't think this is contrary to a literalist perspective, unless that perspective requires the text to be exhaustive in its details.
Aug
11
comment Where in God's promises did it show that Abram needed to have a child through Sarai?
Both of these passages from Genesis take place after Ishmael is born. I read the question to pertain to what God told Abram before Sarai gave him Hagar.
Aug
11
comment Where in God's promises did it show that Abram needed to have a child through Sarai?
It seems possible that God told Abram something to the effect that the promise would be fulfilled through Sarai that isn't written in the text. The fact that God says this is at least a suggestion that Abram should have understood God's words to mean it. God does not have trouble making himself understood.
Aug
11
comment What is the case for the actual collection of scriptures, known as the Bible, being true?
2 Ti 3:16 is almost certainly speaking about the Old Testament. The New Testament hadn't even all been written (including 3 of the 4 gospels) by the time Paul was martyred. It might be possible, by argumentation, to extend his statement to the New Testament, but it would be difficult to demonstrate that when his statement was written down that he meant to refer to the epistles in our New Testament canon.
Aug
11
comment Why was Jehu considered a “bad” king of Israel?
In particular, the great sin of Jereboam was leading the people into idolatry. Jereboam set up the golden calves to keep people from going to Jerusalem to worship. There's nothing written about Jehu doing this particular thing, but the strong suggestion is some sort of institutionalized idolatry.
Aug
5
comment If God is one then why is belief in God insufficient?
Remember that "belief" (πιστευο, 4100) in the case of "belief in God" means more than just "acknowledging the existence of." It means "belief, trust, confidence, conviction, faith, entrusting." Genuine belief in God has consequences.
Aug
4
comment Is there Biblical support for the concept that 'Whenever a man lies with a woman…a transcendental relation is set up between them'?
Marriage does not extend beyond death, but does the relationship between the two eternal beings last beyond death? The relationship is arguably more than the marriage.
Aug
4
comment Does the Bible say if animals in Eden were carnivorous, or when animals on Earth became carnivorous?
Ge 9:2-3 could be understood to mean that God-sanctioned carnivory in humans was not sanctioned until after the flood. This asks the question, were people (and perhaps animals) only herbivorous before?
Jul
31
comment Did Jonah die and raise from the dead?
@Caleb Pentecostals, in general, believe the Bible to be reliable. It seems like arguing from the text would be sufficiently "Pentecostal" to be of some value. With upwards of 170 denominations, it's not as if there's an official Pentecostal position in the first place. They, generally, read the Bible a certain way, but apart from those initial assumptions, there's nothing particularly Pentecostal about this particular question or answer, is there?
Jul
30
comment Did Jonah die and raise from the dead?
@Caleb "Probably" in an understatement, but absolute certainty would be an overstatement.
Jul
30
comment Did Jonah die and raise from the dead?
Deliverance from Sheol/the grave is commonly used in Hebrew poetry. (e.g. Ps 30:3, Ps 86:13, Pr 23:14)
Jul
30
comment Is there a Biblical basis for born-again virginity?
In that we should return to holiness and purity, there definitely is a Biblical impulsion. God redeems his unfaithful bride (e.g. Hosea), but I don't see a direct link between that and a "second virginity." Like I said, it is at best an application of Christian principles.
Jul
28
comment What is the origin of the tradition that Mary lived in Turkey after John took her there?
@Steve, the Wikipedia article I linked claims that tradition says that John was pardoned by Emperor Nerva, though I don't see a primary source cited. Googling suggests that Nerve pardoned many (all?) that Domitian had banished, and so it is at least not illogical to think that the apostle John was among them. As for Mary, John was primarily responsible for her care. He could very well have arranged to have Mary cared for when he was banished. I suppose she could have gone with him to Patmos. My guess is that banishment doesn't have to mean solitary confinement.
Jul
27
comment What is the origin of the tradition that Mary lived in Turkey after John took her there?
The apostle John's tomb is supposed to be in Ephesus. This tradition dates to the 6th century. As John was to care for Mary, it would make sense that she lived there.
Jul
23
comment To a YEC, how does a metaphorical interpretation of Genesis 1-3 distort the gospel?
@Flimzy, I've added some links so that my opinions are now "supported," although I don't know if you'll find my support credible. These documents at least provide some means for testing the hypothesis that the text is historical (literal) rather than poetic/metaphorical. Naturally, this is not universally agreed upon, but it is a reasonable conclusion held by a number of YEC's (and perhaps others). Whether or not you can make a strong case against this assertion does not render it unsupported opinion.
Jul
21
comment What is the basis for the claim that Ezekiel 44 is about Mary the Mother of Jesus?
I don't mean to suggest that there could be exactly one meaning of a passage, but if the church says, "(among other things) this passage certainly is speaking about Mary," that would be something.