2,473 reputation
212
bio website hartmen.us/todd
location United States
age 40
visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen 1 hour ago

Christian, dad, and programmer


1d
comment Commandments about killing children
To believe them to be merely the words of men is to deny the divine origin of the Bible and to rob it of any authoritative power.
2d
comment Commandments about killing children
@Darryl, I don't know precisely what might have constituted "being rebellious" or "cursing your parent," but I suspect it's a lot more egregious than what you're thinking. The textual example of "being rebellious" includes things like being a drunkard and a glutton. I can't thing of an occasion when the Scripture records that anyone ever took this prerogative with their children.
2d
comment Commandments about killing children
@Darryl, You asked about living 3,500 years ago. That was a different time. Would CPS have taken Isaac from Abraham? Would they have jailed Hannah for abandoning Samuel? CPS wouldn't even have existed long ago. People had more important things to do. The community had an obligation to look out for the welfare of everyone (including children), but they didn't employ complete strangers to monitor the choices of parents.
2d
answered What is the meaning in the Bible for the “Branch”?
2d
revised Commandments about killing children
added question
2d
comment Commandments about killing children
"Risking an eternity in Hell" is a curious proposition. It seems that were I to say something like that, I would be saying, "If God wanted me to do this thing, I would reject him."
2d
answered Commandments about killing children
2d
comment Is religious pluralism viable in Christianity?
Perhaps the answers would be more to your liking if you described the kind of "pluralism" you're interested in. Pluralism in the sense that we can get along with people of other diametrically opposed worldviews is one thing. Pluralism in the sense of accepting those worldviews as though they were legitimate is something Christianity cannot do, else it relinquish its claim to the truth and the meaning of truth in the first place.
2d
comment Is religious pluralism viable in Christianity?
Even though there are some similarities in the conduct prescribed or practiced by the believers, the obvious differences between Islam and Christianity are pretty important. I once took a survey that told me my beliefs were 71% compatible with Unitarian Universalism (a group that accepts nearly everything), but the 29% incompatibilites were the things of greatest importance.
2d
answered Is religious pluralism viable in Christianity?
Apr
14
answered How can one explain the apparent contradiction between Ex 31:17 and Is 40:28
Apr
13
comment Why can't there be another fall?
@V.Rollins, is this filling in something missing in my answer or in contradiction to something I've said? I said that there will be no more sin. Most of my answer is about why this could be, because (I assert) the scriptures do not provide a simple answer to why.
Apr
13
comment Why can't there be another fall?
@V.Rollins, Nahum 1 starts out with "An oracle of Ninevah," and uses the same kind of language you'd find in any other prophesy to humans about God's wrath (in this life, I presume) for their continued sins. If you want to assert that Nahum 1 is speaking of final judgment, the burden is on you to justify the claim.
Apr
13
comment How do Trinitarians explain verses where Jesus claims to have a God?
@user1361315 The Romans already held that their emperors were/would be deities (though my understanding of this is imperfect). It seems conceivable that saying that you were a god was in itself a challenge to Roman authority. Either way, Pilate didn't consider the Jews' claim to hold much weight, since he said publicly, "What has he done?" It just doesn't make sense that the Jews would call claiming to be the Messiah "blasphemy."
Apr
10
comment What is the reason and meaning of the symbols on the garments worn by Temple-worthy LDS members?
Is the "answer" different for everyone?
Apr
5
comment How do Trinitarians explain verses where Jesus claims to have a God?
@user1361315 I agree that "son of God" doesn't mean anything other than "human being" in Jewish theology. These Jews were speaking to a Roman, and this was their charge that equated to blasphemy. "…and by that law He ought to die because He made Himself out to be the Son of God." They were not using the phrase in the typical Hebrew sense since a Roman wouldn't share their definition of the word. I assert that saying he was deity would have been much more damning in the eyes of a Roman. It certainly meant something more than what "son of God" meant to the Jews.
Apr
4
comment How do Trinitarians explain verses where Jesus claims to have a God?
@user1361315, I don't know what qualifies as "authentic passages" for you. I'm using the typical protestant canon. "I am" is the name that God gave himself ("This is my name forever..."; Ex 3). The Jews certainly knew what he was implying by this statement. When they accused him before Pilate (Jn 19), they said, "He made Himself out to be the Son of God," meaning that Jesus asserted himself to be deity.
Mar
27
comment What does it mean when God 'hardens' a heart?
Wouldn't this line of reasoning require us to come up with a new vocabulary of "finite" words for virtues/concepts embodied by God, like love, truth, compassion, mercy, gentleness, etc.? I naturally concur that God is infinitely greater than us in every way imaginable, but isn't it safe to assume that if we're speaking about humans, we don't mean to say that they are on par with God in any way?
Mar
26
comment What does it mean when God 'hardens' a heart?
Is Calvin's beef with us having "free will" more than that God's is "free-er," and so ours must be (somewhat) less that completely "free?" The sentiment of the argument seems valid to me, I just don't see why he takes issue with saying that we have "free will." Does "free will" have to mean "absolutely free will?"
Mar
19
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