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Jul
3
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
I appreciate your thoughts. I think we again come to examples of being angry, but not AT God. Perhaps what I'm asking for is not possible, but it seems for it to have biblical basis by example, we would need to see someone expressing their anger with God, and see it somehow affirmed as acceptable or right. That of course would only be the case if we're using an example rather than a command or a word from God.
Jul
3
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
@AdamWood - Very true, however David was "a man after God's own heart" and he committed adultery and essentially murder. While Job was considered righteous and is rewarded, I'm not sure that affirms that being angry with God and letting him know it was right. That said, I definitely need to reread before commenting further, because I might be in complete agreement with you afterward.
Jul
3
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
@Steve - That was my initial thought, but I didn't feel comfortably replying since Job is a bit hazy at the moment for me (thus the refresher).
Jul
3
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
Thanks for your thoughts, I appreciate it. It seems the issue of contention (and really what began this question) is can we reinterpret "gods" to apply to things other than what the beholder considers a god. When simply reading it as it lays, He never alludes to anything beyond graven images or gods. Can one assume he means that a god is anything we devote our attention to, even if it's not a god? And I think this is the issue, because it seems like we may be creating a metaphor where there may be only a literal statement. Am I communicating the issue I see?
Jul
3
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
Thanks for your thoughts! With respect, I'm not sure I followed the connection you drew from the catechism. It seems (and I may have totally misunderstood you, so forgive me if so) that you're interpreting the interpretation. Have I misunderstood you?
Jul
3
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
Great thoughts, I appreciate it. I actually came across the Colossians passage while researching this answer, and it comes to mind that there was an argument to it, but I don't recall from the top of my head. I will try to think of it because I would love to get your take.
Jul
3
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
What a fantastic, well thought out answer. I will definitely need to reread and process this. Many thanks for your input.
Jul
3
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
@fresbend - I do find that interesting! As I mentioned in the question in my footnote, I'm not so much concerned in this question with right/wrong or sin/not, but rather merely if idolatry has an extended meaning beyond the obvious from a biblical basis. I'd say it's pretty hard to argue that "modern idolatry" is a good thing, or a good way to follow God, but my question is more specific in this case. Still a great read though, thank you!
Jul
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Jul
2
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
As I said, I think it's a non-sequitur. Rather than dodge your question though: I do not have an opinion on the numbering of the ten commandments, to me it does not matter how they're numbered (the important concepts are all there, regardless of formatting). Whether you separate "no other gods" and the "graven images" statements or you put them together, it has no bearing on what is idolatry... both have clear and simple definitions, and no alternate definition is suggested or provided in that part of the text.
Jul
2
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
I've updated the question to be more clear as to what I'm asking
Jul
2
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
I will take another look at Job; I am not recalling it the way you're explaining it so I must need a refresher. Thanks!
Jul
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revised Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
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Jul
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Jul
2
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
@LCIII - That's a great example, but again, was any of that anger directed AT God, or just expressing it TO God. There's a subtle, but large, difference between "tell God when you're having a bad day" and "tell God that your upset he's given you a bad day." I'm looking for some evidence of the latter. I will clarify my question and give a better example.
Jul
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awarded  Critic
Jul
2
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
As far as the 10 commandments thought: Exodus 20 only suggests that you shall have no other gods before Him (so think other religion's gods) and no carved/graven images. It says nothing about idolatry in verse 3 (though it could be argued that it IS idolatry). Incidentally, Jews and Catholics agree that the no other gods/idolatry commandment is one commandment; protestants differ.
Jul
2
comment Is there Biblical basis for idolatry being “things” we put higher than God?
Actually, my question is wide open, and I genuinely want to know (in fact, I'd like to see Biblical basis for this interpretation of idolatry for more than a couple reasons). However, I would like the Bible to speak for itself. I am not in favor of either view, however as I see it the burden of proof is on those that are making the claim that idolatry extends beyond what is apparently defined in the Bible.
Jul
2
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
I appreciate your feedback. If I could dig deeper and challenge your response just a bit (no offense meant of course): all of your examples reference feelings about other things/people/etc. Unfortunately, none of them demonstrate feelings at God. The first being misery about himself/his people, then anger about his situation and (really) the people of Ninevah, and finally fear and despair. While Jonah could be argued he's mad directly at God (because he certainly could be based on what he says and the situation), it's clearly cast in a bad light, an example of foolishness. Thoughts?
Jul
2
comment Is there a Biblical basis for the concept of being allowed to “be angry with God” or “tell him just how we feel”
Certainly: let's just take my first example. I have heard it said many times that it's okay to be angry at God. I'm looking for the biblical basis for such a statement.