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Sep
18
comment Does the Catholic church have an officially-sanctioned, organized form of spirituality analogous to Orthodox hesychasm?
just going by Wikipedia definitions of Hesychasm and Asceticism, they appear to be what we'd call Spiritualities, and there are several: Jesuit (see ignatianspirituality.com/what-is-ignatian-spirituality for example), Dominican, etc. (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_spirituality) Is that what you're looking for?
Sep
18
comment Are pride and boasting ever okay?
a bit off-topic, but I struggle with the "proud of someone else/someone else's actions" version of this word (especially when held against your "good pride" meaning, which is what I usually mean when I use or think of the word). Upon my son's engagement, people would say "congratulations, you must be proud." I'm not sure how to react - I certainly did't have anything to do with the engagement; how can I be "proud"?
Jul
7
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Feb
23
comment Why do some Catholics file up for commmunion?
"just a matter of what works for each parish." Very true, and to add to the confusion for visitors there are parishes at which the queues start with the front rows and others that begin with the last rows. Then... at my inlaws' church some sections start at the front, others at the back!
Jan
16
comment Catholic view of Biblical saints
I've also just learned/realized that there's a difference between "saint" and "Saint" - we could all be considered the former while only those recognized (as described above) get the capital letter. As with many Catholic/Protestant disagreements (in my experience, anyway), it's a matter of definition.
May
2
comment Catholic view of Biblical saints
well, you'd certainly not want to call Saul a Saint, but later in his life he seemed to turn things around :-)
May
1
comment Are non-Anglican Protestant churches ever named after extra-biblical saints?
just another example: St. Aidan's Episcopal Church, Milton Ga staidans.org
Apr
30
comment Catholic view of Biblical saints
That doesn't sound like I'm explaining it very well either. I'm not saying they're in heaven simply because the church gives them a "this one's a saint" toe-tag. More like 1.their life & its effect we believe them to be in heaven, 2.people like that are called "Saints", 3.therefore those are Saints. I suppose that it would be difficult, from the viewpoint that Sainthood = as close to perfection as a human can be, to say that we (living) are Saints as we continue to be fallible creatures. Sainthood could only be something that could be determined after one's life is complete.
Apr
30
comment Catholic view of Biblical saints
That's my understanding, though (and I may be mis-reading here) the cause/effect feels backwards in the way you phrase it from what I'm expecting. One could only be considered a Saint because we believe them to almost certainly be in heaven, not that they're almost certainly in heaven because we have determined that their life was saintly.
Apr
30
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Apr
30
answered Catholic view of Biblical saints
Apr
30
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