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Your basic geek computer science dork. Interested in learning about compilers, AI, machine learning, and software architecture. Enjoys programming embedded systems.


Nov
15
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@ZackMartin Very good question. I hadn't thought of it, and I'm not sure. The assumption is that they've repented, they know they were wrong to set up their union in an attempt to mirror what scripture calls a marriage and they call their union sin, so this much is good. At this point it is essentially just a legal contract. However, it is still in contrast to the marital illustration of the gospel, as would a heterosexual marriage with the same situation: two people with able bodies and minds who refuse to unite with each other.. that is not a biblically-congruent marriage. See my difficulty?
Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
Your answer should be the accepted one at this point. +1, nice formatting.
Nov
14
revised How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
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Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@JonEricson The analogy was meant to convey an act by two consenting adults that is performed in legality. It was not meant to describe a similar commitment level. I can see why you would have taken it that way. I am editing, but please do not feel a pressure to change your vote.
Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@BruceAlderman I am not responsible for sins that I do not commit, and I wish them well. It seems evil to me to move from a state of tolerance of an individual to acceptance of their sin just for the sake of keeping them in the local body. For this same reason, Paul encouraged some people to be removed from a local body... and I'm not even going that far! They are not asked to leave, but biblical standards are upheld.
Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@BruceAlderman It's not a matter of pushing. I understand how it comes across that way over the internet, but that's not the intent. Please place the emphasis where I intend it to be placed: I have no business telling someone what to do in their personal life. However, if they steadfastly refuse to acknowledge that their life contains what our local body believes that the scriptures plainly described as sin, we cannot let them serve or encourage them to partake in the ordinances. If this offends them and they decide to leave, I have a clear conscience over this.
Nov
14
revised How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
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Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
I will not give a citation as I said originally: I start with the assumption that the Bible has no idea of a homosexual marriage. That is worth another question and there are others more qualified to answer. It stems from marriage being used as an illustration of Christ's union with us: therefore a man will leave his parents and cling to his wife.
Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@WaxEagle But that's the point: they are not the product of a marriage. They are the product of a union, not a marriage. This is also true of heterosexual couples who live together and produce children. It is immaterial what the law says. Lawfully, I must treat them as a married couple. Spiritually, I must not treat them as a married couple. It's as though the question is "how should we make people who jumped into a pit and hurt themselves comfortable?" when God says "I told you not to jump in the pit!"
Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@DJClayworth Supporting someone financially and emotionally does not mean that you are united with them. If this was the case, I am married to many of the people in my church. They can still support each other, but apart from marriage cohabitation with sexual interaction is sin. A homosexual union is not a biblical marriage, regardless of how it is treated under law. Additionally, when we sin, sometimes it hurts. We don't need to add to this hurt, but God did not tell Adam "well, I don't want that you should have to feed yourself by the sweat of your brow, so let's say this didn't happen."
Nov
14
revised How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
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Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@WaxEagle I apologize. I got lost in the comments after being away for a few hours. I assume that your comment starting with "ok." is for me. Again, I see the issue of homosexuals with children as no different than a divorcee bringing children to church. Sin was committed. You cannot un-fire a cannon. However, we can not sanction sin (as we often do for our "pet sins"). Please see the edited version of my answer for my reply (coming shortly).
Nov
13
answered How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
Nov
1
answered What is the origin of the Devil's red pointy costume and pitchfork?
Oct
15
comment Why does God often permit his children to suffer in this world more than the wicked?
@Hammer ...I think you miss the point with your crtique of this question. The "sparrow" passage creates a baseline. The neglected, abused girl would be above that baseline in the Father's care. So if those in the baseline do not fall but without the permission of the Father, what of those above the baseline who are worth much more?
Oct
9
comment Is 1 Corinthians 7:26-40 not the 'Word of God'?
I can't speak for all, but I have no problem taking this at face value. He's telling us that it's not directly from God, but his conscience has been enlightened by God in a way that few others have, so his advice is worth hearing and heeding. I don't have a problem with this.
Oct
1
comment Why are Independent Baptist Fundamentalists labelled Protestants?
@PeterTurner Technically, yes... no roots in the Catholic Church, but that technicality is removed if you consider that early Baptists (John Smyth in particular) grew out of the Anglican Church, which was itself only one step from the Roman Church. So in reality, the claim that there were no Roots in Roman Catholicism is rather silly. I think the impetus is on the questioner to cite some form of Baptist theology that completely bypasses the Roman Hierarchy. And this is coming from a Baptist.
Sep
28
comment Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
2) Let me put my friendly critic hat on: what's curious is that you also don't ask the same question about communion, baptism, prayer, and works. If you're saved by grace, you don't need any of those things for salvation, right? So why even bother? If holy, sovereign God already knows who is going to do what, why they will do it, when they will do it, and whom they will do it to, then why pray? What about these things do you find "intellectually satisfying?"
Sep
28
comment Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
1) Your claim that it glorifies God to punish those in hell is too crass to make clear Biblical sense. God is not willing that any should perish, yet in His plan many do. Is God glorified in this? Yes. Does He delight in it? No. He doesn't take joy in it. Your crassness doesn't let one appreciate the difficulties of this problem.
Sep
28
comment Is the following rationale for sharing the gospel consistent with reformed theology?
Praise God for when we no longer look upon His commandments as "not intellectually satisfying."