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Your basic geek computer science dork. Interested in learning about compilers, AI, machine learning, and software architecture. Enjoys programming embedded systems.


Dec
21
answered Is Matthew 24:36 contrary to trinitarianism?
Dec
21
awarded  Organizer
Dec
21
revised Is Matthew 24:36 contrary to trinitarianism?
edited tags
Dec
18
comment Difference between Augustinianism and Calvinism
@gmoothart Thanks. I'll read the section when I have the time. My intuition is that you're not considering the default status of each individual from the fall. In this theology, each of us begins with a lack of merit and inherited guilt... ...unless I am wrong on Calvin's view of this, too. (I don't know... I haven't read him much).
Dec
18
comment Difference between Augustinianism and Calvinism
You've set up a scenario whereby Calvin would defend an active reprobation as opposed to a passive one. Your quote of Calvin neither defends nor denies this claim. There is nothing in the quote that says Calvin believed that it requires God to actively do something in order to harden and reprobate. The Calvinist authors I read believe that when God hardens, he actually does nothing (in other words, he leaves them as they are in their default state of rejection), as opposed to working in the hearts of His chosen that they would repent. Can you find a better quote or else change your answer?
Dec
18
comment Are Calvinism and Arminianism compatible?
@Jas3.1 If you're studying this, I recommend a couple short books: "Grace, Faith, Free Will" by Picirilli, "Why I am not a Calvinist" by Walls and Dongel. On the other side, "Chosen by God" by Sproul, and with the caveat that I have not read this last one, "For Calvinism" by Horton. If you can only choose two, I would go with Sproul's and Walls + Dongel's.
Dec
18
comment Are Calvinism and Arminianism compatible?
...by responding with repentance. Essentially, God inclines a man to follow him until the man decides he doesn't want to be inclined to that and will not repent. As a Calvinist, I obviously disagree with the Arminian position, but the real sticking point to me is that we both agree on Total Depravity and dependence on God for quickening. Without common ground on that, I cannot have fellowship with a person who calls themselves a Christian, because they would not be in need of Christ in the way that I am.
Dec
18
comment Are Calvinism and Arminianism compatible?
@Jas3.1 Part of the debate is how God acts on people. So while what you've written in your last comment is pretty accurate, it's not 100%. Calvinists believe that until God regenerates a man, the man continually rebels and that when he no longer rebels, it's because God has quickened him. Though the man must choose to obey God, when he finally does so, it is not because he's cooperating with God, it's because he is inclined to. The Arminian position begins with the same rebellion but says that God quickens all men and that it's each man's choice to act in cooperation with God...
Dec
14
comment Are Calvinism and Arminianism compatible?
Yes indeed. I didn't see that in the comment, so I think I automatically assumed that you were in compare and contrast mode.
Dec
14
comment Are Calvinism and Arminianism compatible?
Just a note here, I'm about as much of a monergist as you can be. Some days I find myself closer to Calvin, some days closer to Luther, never closer to Wesley. However, I attend and serve under a very Arminian pastor (we are Baptist; he used to be a Methodist). Sometimes we cringe when we hear each other speak, but we both want to advance the cause of Christ, and so long as he is the pastor, my duty is to respect the man for being in the office or else wish him well personally and serve elsewhere. This is an important, but not divisive, issue in our church.
Dec
14
comment Are Calvinism and Arminianism compatible?
@Footwasher what you have written in your last comment leaves no distinction between Calvinists and Arminians. You should have said "both positions hold that a response..." The disagreement isn't over whether one must choose to believe to be saved; the question is how that person comes to have the ability to choose.
Dec
13
comment Are Calvinism and Arminianism compatible?
1) Calvinists believe God will not save any who do not want to be saved. The question is fundamentally "how does one want to become saved?" That's where the disagreement is (Prevenient Grace enabling a choice leading to life vs. Calvinistic Regeneration yielding life and guaranteeing the proper choice). 2) It doesn't matter much this specific discussion, but I think you'll find that Calvinists stress God's holiness above all else, followed closely by His Sovereignty.
Dec
6
comment Do Calvinists believe that God does not love the world, but only the elect?
What you're referring to are consequences related to hyper Calvinism. Phil Johnson's article is worth a read in this case. spurgeon.org/~phil/articles/hypercal.htm
Dec
6
comment Was Christ the man created?
Thanks for the links.
Dec
5
comment How does the Bible differentiate between sickness and sin?
If a genetic happening creates a disease that gives one a proclivity toward sin, this does not preclude that any actions coming from the genetic happening are not sin (alcoholism, homosexuality [according to some], etc.). We look at God and say "I do what I do because all humans have fallen into a metaphorical pit and cannot escape it. I am not without excuse because of my genetics that are affected by the fall." And then God answers: "I told you to keep away from the pit in the first place." The gospel though is that God can count people in metaphorical pits as righteous when they are not.
Nov
20
comment Can a Christian walk away from his or her salvation?
Just adding a note (no down votes), your point regarding irresistible grace is so blunt that it is inaccurate. The point is that the recipient of the grace is given a new heart and out of this new heart their desires change so that they want to please God. The point is not that God saves a person who all their life, until their death, stomps their feet and shouts "But I don't want to be saved!" I'm not sure which you meant because of the ambiguity of the wording.
Nov
16
comment Did Esau go to heaven or hell?
Just a note, the passage does not need to refer to nations. Surely Jacob and Esau each grew into nations, but the passage was concerning the men themselves. Abraham was chosen. Isaac was the son of the promise, no Ishmael. Jacob was chosen, not Esau. Joseph was chosen in a way his brothers weren't. When you begin talking about the patriarchs and covenants, there is no warrant to assume that each passage is talking about the nations and not the men. After all, Paul labored this point in Romans 9: fleshly descent of a man or nation is not what makes you part of the promise.
Nov
16
comment Did Esau go to heaven or hell?
As a 5-point Calvinist, I used to cite this passage as defense of my position. I no longer do that in the way I used to. This passage does not directly concern which individuals goes to heaven and which to hell. It concerns Paul explaining that God did not break the covenants when he made Christ the way of salvation and physical descent from the patriarchs only ancillary to the historical events. Conflating the two ideas (salvation of individuals and promises to the patriarchs) is not helpful for this passage. The passage describes God's sovereign right to choose who is part of the promise.
Nov
15
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
@ZackMartin Very good question. I hadn't thought of it, and I'm not sure. The assumption is that they've repented, they know they were wrong to set up their union in an attempt to mirror what scripture calls a marriage and they call their union sin, so this much is good. At this point it is essentially just a legal contract. However, it is still in contrast to the marital illustration of the gospel, as would a heterosexual marriage with the same situation: two people with able bodies and minds who refuse to unite with each other.. that is not a biblically-congruent marriage. See my difficulty?
Nov
14
comment How should Reformed Christians deal with homosexual marriage of individuals prior to their conversion to Christianity?
Your answer should be the accepted one at this point. +1, nice formatting.