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seen Nov 4 '14 at 19:54

David Morton is a person. You can find him on Twitter at @HelloDMO, where he rarely tweets at all.


Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@Marc, That's my whole point. The secularist trusts primarily his own understanding of things, and the Christian "Trust[s] in the LORD with all [his] heart and lean[s] not on [his] own understanding." (Proverbs 3:5). As such, vastly different conclusions will be made regarding not only the morality of certain things, but also the understanding of what truth and belief are, seeing truth as revealed, not discovered. The primary feature of belief is no longer the believer, but the validity of the belief itself.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
I agree, believing in something does not make it true, however, the converse is also true, disbelieving in something does not make it false. Truth stands as truth regardless of belief. However, secularism does not come without it's own baggage. It assumes that human reason is to be trusted more than revelation. This, of course, stands in opposition to the belief that there is something more trustworthy than human reason, a belief that Christians do hold to. In other words, you hold as truth the idea that human reason is paramount. All other ideas are, thus, unprovable, except that one.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
And as for the fracturing of Christianity, I couldn't agree with you more. Christianity is mostly fractured, however, because people within Christianity disagree on what the truth is that should be believed. Over the years, what used to be core beliefs and methodologies within Christianity have changed so much, that there are many "Churches" that many Christians wish would stop calling themselves "Church", as they do not carry traditional, historical hallmarks of a church. For instance, they may disbelieve with the physical resurrection of Christ or the importance of the Bible.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
The whole objection with this viewpoint is that it is ultimately reduces the meaning of belief to the level of opinion. Belief, by definition, means taking a particular statement as truth. Truth, by definition, stands in opposition to falsity. A Christian who believes isn't simply elevating the importance of his/her belief, he/she is saying it is true, and all opposing beliefs are false. More than that, a Christian also believes there are eternal consequences of actions and decisions, not only for those who believe, but also for those who don't believe.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
This viewpoint sounds like: "Do what you feel like and don't judge others on what they do." It also seems to discount Christianity as merely religion, in the sense that it is one among many, which most Christians, I believe, would find disagreeable. Lastly, your final statement might be interpreted to place mankind on the same value basis as animals, which again, would be something that most Christians (I know) would also find disagreeable. That said, it's an excellent viewpoint from a secular humanist perspective, and probably the strongest argument I could give towards a non-Christian.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@Marc Yours is a very consistent viewpoint, indeed. The arguments for a secular humanist surrounding assisted suicide must be different than the Christian arguments, as the secular humanist rejects a Biblical foundation to inform his beliefs, while (Biblical) Christians attempt to view God's thoughts as more important than their own. Also, the individualistic approach to morality is inherently inconsistent with the Christian approach to morality, solely on the basis that Christianity is non-relativistic, catering to a very real third party outside of humanity (God). But that's another topic.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@MarcGravell FWIW: My wife tends to agree with you that the arguments for/against assisted suicide are trickier than the arguments for/against abortion, especially from a secular humanist perspective. That being said, I'm not a secular humanist, and it wasn't my aim to give a response to that position, but merely to state the Christian viewpoint, and, incidentally, how it applies to both situations.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@MarcGravell That being said, you're probably right. Even mentioning abortion may inflame things more than necessary. My argument could have probably been made without mention of it.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@MarcGravell: I think that's where I tend to disagree in general with Assisted Suicide. I don't believe that it is the right of the victim to consider and make a decision on his/her death. If they are truly "not their own" then what happens to their body physically is left up to God's discretion, and submission to his will supersedes their desire to escape pain. All in all, it's rooted in an attitude of willful submission to God's wisdom, not our own.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@MarcGravell And I apologize for my superlative. Perhaps, "People rarely consider" might have been better wording. In the end however, the ends here are far more important than the means and reasoning. Considered or not, the pro-choice argument makes decisions regarding life and death based on the situation of the child or parent. Assisted Suicide is no different, except that only the situation of the one who wishes to commit suicide is considered. If the situation of anyone else is considered, then it'd be called murder.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@MarcGravell Fair enough. It wasn't my aim to inflame anything here. My aim was to show that the mindset for both is similar (regardless of how we excuse it). In both situations, the debate centers around whose right it is to prescribe death: man's or God's. Regardless of whether the prescription is self-referential or applied to another human, where one falls on that debate informs your view for both or either. And I don't think the situations are completely disconnected. Both are dealing with humans making decisions regarding life and death.
Apr
11
comment a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
@MarcGravell, the non-Christian argument in favor of assisted suicide really is the same argument: "It's my body. I do with it what I want." Nobody pro-choice considers the baby's body, unless it is deemed to have an "error". I agree with you wholeheartedly that there's no point in presenting this argument to a non-Christian. That's exactly what I state in my second-to-last paragraph. I agree it's immoral to ignore a suffering soul, however, the end of the argument in Christianity comes down to whose right is it to take the life, which comes down to whose body it is: ours or God's.
Apr
11
answered a Christian response to dying in dignity or assisted suicide?
Apr
10
comment The Grace Gambit
@MasonWheeler Flynt no longer considers himself a Christian. Wikipedia has a reference to his own denouncement of his faith on Larry King Live.
Apr
10
comment What is the biblical basis for Postmillennialism?
@SonicTheHedgehog I tend towards amillenial, though I grew up in (and currently attend) a pre-millenial church, and my father is a post-mil.
Apr
10
answered The Grace Gambit
Apr
10
comment The Grace Gambit
Wondering if you'd mind if I posted an answer that comes from the sola fide perspective on why this is a dangerous belief?
Apr
10
answered Is Galatians 6:8-9 teaching works salvation?
Apr
10
comment What is the biblical basis for Postmillennialism?
As a side note, my brother once purchased "Three Views on the Millenium and Beyond" for me for my birthday. It has three people, all proponents of one viewpoint, outlining their Biblical understanding of the three points.
Apr
5
comment What is the basis for Systematic Expository Preaching?
Another good verse for this would be 2 Timothy 3:16. If ALL scripture is God-breathed and useful, then we ought to systematically go through ALL scripture, so we don't avoid the parts that make us feel uncomfortable, in our selfish effort to "be happy". biblia.com/bible/esv/2Ti3.16