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31

If you accept that God could create the universe out of nothing and create it any way He desired, then the explanation of God creating the universe with photons in flight has to be taken as a possiblity. I realize you have discounted it as deceptive and therefore unacceptable, but consider the following... When God created trees, did He create only seeds ...


22

It should be clear from the answers so far that, while there are many creationist theories about distant starlight, there is no one widely held "answer". This is ok if you treat young-earth creationism like science. Open questions and competing theories are what science is about! It's even ok to say "we don't know right now" - in fact that is better than ...


16

Again... This is not about the validity of the YEC view. The point of this is not to reveal "Truth", the point is to accurately explain the doctrinal significance of the view, from the perspective of those who believe the view, so that we have it on record on site. The answer is quite simple, actually, and laid out very well on the Answers in Genesis ...


16

There are two main theories creationists used to explain it: In 1857 Philip Goose wrote the book Omphalos which proposes the omphalos hypothesis and argues, that God must have created the earth as it is today, with mountains, canyons, tree rings, and thus with the light of stars. This theory, of course, raises the question of when the "false history" ...


16

An extremely simple argument for this sense is to consider the following two questions: Q1. Does the epistle of Romans assume and rely on an essentially literal* interpretation of the fall of man (cf. Genesis 1-3)? Q2. How foundational is the epistle of Romans to a Christian understanding of the gospel? It may be possible to argue these points to a ...


15

The short version is that there are many places in the Bible that quote/reference the creation account in the book of Genesis literally (Exodus 16:16, Exodus 20:11, Exodus 31:17, Leviticus 23:3, Deuteronomy 5:13, Luke 13:14, etc). The most obvious is the "reasoning" given for the 4th Commandment: Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the ...


14

Here's a video series to address the issue: http://www.answersingenesis.org/media/video/ondemand/distant-starlight AIG, is young earth and they have lots of resources to check out. I would agree with Jim in saying it's possible for God to create stuff with age. It sounds like you don't like that in the 3rd point of your question, since it makes God look ...


13

No. The age of the earth is not clearly stated in the Bible. However, according to young-earth creationists (like myself), it can be derived, assuming that the word "Day" in Genesis means a literal day, and that the genealogies are accurate. Adding up the genealogies can give an age of about 6,000 years, but there are some gaps in the genealogies, and ...


13

The notion that all viruses are bad is worth challenging. In 2008 paediatrician Dr Lawrence D. Rosen, MD published a blog post entitled Viruses and Health: Not all bad? which looked at two interesting cases and concluded: In both of these cases, it appears that viral infections may indeed confer some sort of protection or health benefit to the host. ...


13

Based on the wording of your question, I assume you want a literalist/young earth creationist perspective. This isn't the only perspective in Christianity. Plenty believe in evolution, or one form of Old Earth Creationism or another. The last portion of this answer, on particular, will likely be jumped on by the OEC and Evolutionist crowds, as it's ...


12

There is nothing in the Bible that pins down the date. Just to give an alternative view to the speculation that exists in YEC (the existing answer), the (Roman) Catholic church has an official position that is in acceptance of the scientific age of about 4.5 billion years. I won't bother copying it all, but see Wikipedia under the heading "Pope Benedict XVI ...


11

I'm very hesitant to answer anything on this as no matter what position I take, it will incite endless debate and comments. However, I believe there is a simple answer that all sides can hold as acceptable truth. The fact is that we all have the same evidence. Whether Atheist, Christian, Buddhist, Wiccan, YEC, OEC, the evidence never changes. The ...


11

Rephrasing what you said slightly more succinctly- it isn't about history, it's about trustworthiness. Creationists see all theories that attempt to explain origins as inherently matters of faith. One either trusts that matter could have somehow been there, packed so densely together that it caused a universe creating explosion, and then developed strictly ...


11

@El'endia Starman's comment is correct. One of the common assumptions of the young-earth position is that the dating methods that give us billions or millions of years of history are flawed. I could give hundreds links to support the statement that this is a well-accepted assumption among YEC-ists, but I'll limit myself. ...


10

If these "historical records" could be trusted as absolute truth then this would be a problem for Young Earth Creationists. However, ask any ancient historian and they will tell you that there has been some major corruption in the so-called "historical records" of ancient cultures. This is due in part to the "age wars" which took place between various ...


8

I think it's clear that your assumption is wrong, and that figurative interpretations of the Genesis were always common amongst scholarly interpreters, such as for example St. Augustine. At the very least, he thinks that the transgression in the Garden of Eden was in fact of a sexual nature, and therefore the account as it is, is figurative. Further, we are ...


7

No textual reason for interpreting Genesis figuratively Whenever we ask why we should take something in the Bible as literal, we must start by asking ask why we should not take it as literal. Does the text give us any reason to interpret it as being figurative? In the book of Revelation, and other places where mortal man is given a glimpse of eternity, ...


7

Young Earth Creationism, abbreviated YEC, is the idea that the earth is relatively young (several thousand years old) compared to Old Earth Creationism (OEC) which agree with secular science that currently claims the earth is 4.55 Billion years old. While there is a lot of good physical evidence for YEC discussed elsewhere the question at hand is what is ...


7

Note that none of this is to say that there weren't also evolutionary views in ancient times. There were. And that this isn't about whether the YEC view is true, it's about whether it was a belief that existed, as the primary belief among Christians (and in Judaism), long before the modern scientific views of origins. I'd also like to point out that my ...


6

Young Earth Creationism is the belief that the Earth is between 6000 and 12000 years old (depending on the tradition.) The Biblical basis for it is taking the periods starting with Genesis 1 and adding them up. The variation in years depends on counting methods, the largest variation being that of considering Genesis 'days' to be 1000 years each.


5

The following is taken from a wonderful book called Our Father Abraham: Jewish Roots of the Christian Faith by Marvin R. Wilson. It explains that an understanding of early Jewish culture helps to understand how they understood scripture. With this understanding, some scripture takes on a different meaning than we would expect today. Just as some phrases we ...


5

For the sake of not getting into an argument, let's assume a genesis / biblical creation, literal/YEC-style. The "trees/rings" thing is pretty much unanswerable, but fortunately we don't even need to know anything about the garden of Eden / Adam, because what we do have is the light from other stars, for which we have good confidence for the distance / ...


5

I'm going to say that he probably couldn't. Naturally, I admit the very real possibility of being wrong. I use Occam's Razor when it comes to determining which scenario is more likely. There are similar questions to "Did the first trees have rings (correlating to actual years of existence)?" Did Adam and Even have navels? It's impossible to say for sure, ...


5

The historical answer to this question has been that Noah's three sons - Shem, Ham, and Japeth - represent the three major races - the Whites, the Blacks, and the Asians. Here, for example, is a reference showing this understanding. Hal Lindsay's Late Great Planet Earth also made reference to this common myth that Noah's son's were the progenitors of the ...


5

Typically, any congregation professing the YEC viewpoint are going to be non denominational. Though the name implies there is an unspecified disagreement among non denominational churches, the vast majority are biblical litetalists. This means they will naturally take the YEC view. As Mawia pointed out in a comment, the date of the creation, and even the ...


4

Clarence Larkin's chart on the table of nations suggests that Noah himself, after the flood, was the father of the Asian races. His lifespan happens to date back 5 millenia. So, it certainly would be possible that the Chinese date back five millenia. The fact that their language changed at the Tower of Babel does not mean that all history was lost at ...


4

The answer to the question, "Does the Bible say the earth is 6000 years old?" is no. The Bible does not directly give the age of the earth explicitly. What the Bible does do is give a chronology in Genesis 5 that, according to some calculations (most famously Bishop Usshar who derived that the earth was created on the evening of October 23, 4004 BC ) ...


4

People don't seem to believe in the firmament as a literal barrier of water up in the sky that collapsed at Noah's flood. The answer to this is amazingly simple. Many Young-Earth Creationists believe that there was a layer of water of some form (ice, water, other possibilities) in the upper atmosphere, or in space, surrounding the earth AND ...


4

Here is an answer from one young Earth creationist. Apparently you got your Scripture from the Hebraic Roots version of the Bible, or the New revised King James version since these are the only versions I know of which say: Genesis 3:8 HRS And they heard the sound of YAHWEH Elohim walking up and down in the garden at the breeze of the day. And the man ...


4

The Issue is the Authority of Scripture and How We Should Read It Not all YEC think alike, but some of the most compelling arguments I've heard regarding this have to do with why it's desirable to someone to make the account metaphorical. If one is just trying to make the Biblical account harmonize with the latest naturalistic theories concerning the age of ...



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