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23

The difference is that a cross in a church is not worshipped. As the translators' notes in the New English Translation (NET) Bible indicates, regarding Exodus 20:4, the concern of the Law with respect to pesel—the Hebrew term referring to "an image that was carved out of wood or stone"—was about statues that "would be made for the purpose of worship, an idol ...


17

We are not commanded to dress a certain way in Scripture, other than that it should be modest. However, I have a strong personal conviction - one I would not try to force on anyone else - that you should dress up for Church. When God appeared to Moses as a burning bush, He commanded Moses to "put off thy shoes from off thy feet, for the place whereon ...


17

Clearly, those phrases can't mean that we have the ability to alter God in any way. I don't think that the definition of "magnify God" in these phrases means to actually make God "bigger" or "greater". I understand them to mean "Make God more prominent in my life, our culture, etc." Magnification doesn't make objects bigger, it alters our perception of an ...


15

It would seem that the Cross could, in fact, be used as an idol. However, from my experience, that would seem to be the exception rather than the rule. The Cross is simply a reminder. I have never prayed to a Cross or have even cared whether one was displayed while I was worshiping. It is merely a symbol, much like the icthus on the back of my car. ...


15

Nope, it's not, actually. Luther used a form of music "bar form", but he was actually opposed to use of common tunes (like Calvin) for his hymns. The following is from an essay called "Major Forms of BS" by T. David Gordon: I cannot count the number of times I have heard the common myth about Martin Luther employing the tunes of familiar “bar songs” in ...


14

I'm familiar with a couple different schools of thought on this. Doubtless there are others as well. The first comes from Greek Orthodox tradition. I can't really speak to it directly, but a quick google search turned up a result indicating that it might have more to do with history and wanting to separate themselves from pagan worship. But there's ...


13

If the Bible is God's Word, and it is to be read and understood in its entirety, then a dogmatic doctrine of vocal-only worship would seem to place large swaths of the Psalms (eg 150) in peril. It is true that in the New Testament we are given no specific direction as to how we are to worship (only "in spirit and in truth"). A lack of both pre-scription ...


12

The scripture is silent on the matter (to the best of my knowledge). As far as I know it's an idea that came about as showing respect for God and the place where he is worshiped. In my opinion, these kinds of things are purely man-made legalistic things that serve to do little except create problems and division. Just my two cents.


11

This answer relates to the Church of Scotland. Dancing has often been regarded with deep suspicion in the Presbyterian tradition. Originally, it was strongly associated with all kinds of bad behaviour, and would certainly not be permitted in church. Even after dancing became more socially acceptable, church was still meant to be a solemn and sober place. ...


11

Key to answering this question is that no mainstream Christian denomination thinks they are actually worshipping any person other than the Triune Godhead - God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit. From the outside, however, accusations are often made in this regard. To the uninitiated, veneration of the Saints can look like worship. To the ...


10

You can dress however you want to, just go. If the church makes you feel unwelcome because of how you are dressed, how you look or any other reason related to your appearance please find a new church, these folks are hypocrites. However, you may be more comfortable if you find a church that the expected dress fits your lifestyle and how you typically dress. ...


9

There is a sense in which an attribute which is an action is not fully realized until it is enacted. Love isn't real without an object of affection. Forgiveness is ethereal until somebody has crossed you. Being a redeemer requires something to save. I would not go so far as to say there was an incompleteness in God that he needed to fill ... that he had a ...


9

I think some of the more telling things about our understanding of the Sabbath should be what Jesus said about the subject, and more importantly what Jesus did on the Sabbath. Jesus healed on the Sabbath several times Matt 12:9-14 (NIV) 9 Going on from that place, he went into their synagogue, 10 and a man with a shriveled hand was there. Looking for a ...


9

Regulations are created for fallen mankind who are unable to live by Spirit and truth. Furthermore, such regulations tend to be best expressed as "thou shalt not" and lend themselves to an end result of legislating every tiny little nuance. Just look at both the Hebrew law and the US law by way of example. That's because these laws are attempting to ...


9

No Christian that I know of prays to the cross, nor considers that the cross of itself has any power (rather, it is Christ's death on the cross that has power), nor even considers the cross sentient! So the cross is merely a symbol of our redemption, reminding us of the price Jesus paid to save us; nothing more.


9

It is a fairly natural idea to have somebody fulfilling this role, and various Christian traditions have done just that. The following are from Worship music: a concise dictionary (ed. Edward Foley, 2000): Cantor [Latin]. "Singer" (1) In Christianity, a 5th-century term for the psalmist; later, the medieval singer (often cleric) who intoned and led the ...


9

I should probably let a member of the LDS Church answer this, as I only attended the LDS Church for a few months. There was an LDS conference during that time, and I'm going to attempt to answer based on what I can find for official statements and my own memory of the event. From the LDS Website: What is general conference? General conference is a ...


8

My school has tried to teach that since we are not instructed to use instruments, we CANNOT use instruments. The same holds for automobiles, drugs and medicine, tractors, refrigerators, computers and so on. Ironically, nobody was told to live in America, as far as I know. Hence, by the same logic, you mustn't use all that and much much more. In ...


8

No, certainly not. There are lots of available resources. Some denominations have guidelines and some reference materials exist for those who do not (such as the Revised Common Lectionary), but by no means do all traditions have set or repeated liturgies. When it falls to me, I build each weeks liturgy based on passages that have some bearing on the sermon ...


8

This website gives a general idea about what some of the Churches of Christ teach about music in worship. As a result of the distinctive plea of the church - a return to New Testament Faith and practice - acappella singing is the only music used in the worship. This singing, unaccompanied by mechanical instruments of music, conforms to the music ...


8

Here's what Matthew Henry says in his short commentary: We should, even in our dress and habit, avoid every thing that may dishonour Christ. The woman was made subject to man, because made for his help and comfort. And she should do nothing, in Christian assemblies, which looked like a claim of being equal. She ought to have "power," that is, a veil, on ...


8

Roger Ellsworth in "Opening Up the Psalms" says not to pronounce the word: The word ‘Selah’ appears seventy-four times in forty psalms. This word signifies a pause or interlude. It may have been used to inform musicians to change instruments or to call for both musicians and listeners to ponder the truth that had been sung. In the public reading of the ...


7

Does God need us to give him glory? No. That would also imply he needs us. God wants us to give him glory because he is the only worthy one. Pslam 96:4-6 (NIV) says For great is the LORD and most worthy of praise; he is to be feared above all gods. For all the gods of the nations are idols, but the LORD made the heavens. Splendor and majesty are ...


7

Luther did not, but William Booth did. He said, "Why should the devil have all the good music." 1 Additionally, one of the most famous songs set to a drinking song is "The Star Spangled Banner." Finally, back to Luther. While he did not set sacred music to drinking songs, he is credited with saying, "Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be ...


7

It's cultural. This is a Catholic answer, but not based on Catholic Dogma or even the Bible. It's just common sense. In the Western Hemisphere, and western Europe (commonly and ruefully [here at least] referred to as the West) we don't need dance to communicate. Furthermore, we can't even interpret dance as language. In African (and other) cultures ...


7

As for "how other Christians view this", the answer is "it depends on the Christian in question." Some Christians, as you pointed out, believe these are signs of the devil, others don't. Just like some Christians see Harry Potter as Satan's way of luring kids into witchcraft, while others think it's a good read and good movies. Some Christians see Satanic ...


7

General Conference is literally the oldest tradition of the LDS Church, as the church was formally organized at a General Conference meeting on April 6, 1830. Section 20 of the Doctrine and Covenants lays out the basic organizational details for the church established during that meeting. Of particular interest to this question are verses 61 and 62: 61 ...


7

I contacted the Valdensian Seminary in Rome and got this reply, from Lothar Vogel, professor of Church History: Dear Mr. Gunther, I thank you very much for your kind request and for your interest in Waldensian history. I can tell you that there are no sources concerning medieval Waldensian hymns or liturgies linked to Eucharistiv ...


6

There is an aspect to this type of question that is dangerous, although surely this is not what you have intended. C. S. Lewis commented upon this in his article "Man or Rabbit?" in the anthology God in the Dock. The gist of his argument is that our heart is not in the right place if we are trying to see what we can get away with, as opposed to constantly ...



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