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"Weaker" Can Also Be Interpreted Physical Strength The Greek word used for weaker is asthenos, which comes from the prefix "a-", meaning not coupled with the root "sthen[os]" for bodily vigour. To say women tend to have less bodily vigour or physical strength seems much more reasonable than the false suggestion woman are somehow morally inferior. ...


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Do women have to be quiet? 1 Corinthians 14:34-35 Let your women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted unto them to speak; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law. And if they will learn any thing, let them ask their husbands at home: for it is a shame for women to speak in the church. The context ...


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yes, women must be silent in church. there is no limitation to Corinth, and no limitation to 1st century in the bible. also, please consider 1. tim 2 ,12


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Yes such a scripture exists, and it was so, at least for the women in Corinth and surrounding regions during the first century: "Let your women keep silence in the churches: for it is not permitted unto them to speak; but they are commanded to be under obedience, as also saith the law." (1 Corinthians 14:34 KJV) The Greek word ὑποτασσέσθωσαν is ...


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There is such a scripture, 1 Corinthians 14:34 (New American Bible, Revised Edition): As in all the churches of the holy ones, women should keep silent in the churches, for they are not allowed to speak, but should be subordinate, as even the law says. Again, 1 Timothy 2:12 states: A woman must receive instruction silently and under complete ...


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What is the modern argument against obligatory head coverings? 1 Corinthians 11:15 But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her: for her hair is given her for a covering. Paul says that the long hair of women acts as a covering. "for a covering" can be translated "in place of a covering" or "instead of a covering". The actual prohibition is ...


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In the Greek weaker vessel can mean not weaker as in physically but weaker in morals. From an English/Greek Lexicon: “ἀσθενής,” Def 2c. from: A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature (3rd ed.) Walter Bauer, revised by F.W. Danker. University Of Chicago Press, 2001.


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From what I see, many wives do not support their husbands' ministry, but either have their own non-overlapping ministry, or simply are not interested in participating for other reasons, such as preferring more worldly pursuits. For most of human history the primary social construct was the family. The idea of a help meet for the husband was more applicable ...



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