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55

This misinterpretation is due to a language shift since the days of King James, when that version of the Ten Commandments was set forth. The term "kill" back then meant what "murder" means today, and I think that everyone would agree that that's a good thing to prohibit in strong, absolute terms. If you look through the King James Version of the Bible, you ...


15

Here's a list of several events just off the top of my head: capture/destruction of Jericho Othniel Gideon's 300 men against the Midianites Samson's final crush of the Philistines Elijah and the prophets of Baal As to why God didn't save them from some oppressors, one of the myriad instances of a single phrase in Judges shows why: Now the sons of ...


14

I don't think that we can say for sure. I think that this particular verse could apply to just about any time in history. Rumors of wars could mean any fear of a coming war, including the cold war. In fact most of the things foretold in Matthew 24 have happened since His time - false messiahs, nation rising against nation, famine, pestilence, ...


11

There are two ways to approach that commandment. Either it is absolute or it is relative: it can either refer to all of human life, or some subset of human life. Clearly it cannot be the former as the Torah also allows for the death penalty (before anyone tries to argue, "but Christ says..." or "but the woman caught in adultery..." I will counter that the ...


9

Just because there is no explicit prohibition on a thing does not mean that the Bible "endorses it." Unwritten Expectations There is, for example, to the best of my knowledge, no biblical prohibition cannibalism. Possibly it wouldn't fall under definition of kosher, but it is at best ambiguous! In spite of this, the author of the text rightfully expects ...


9

Pretty much, No. In general, most Christians reject any idea of coercion in regards to "spreading the faith." Orthodoxy (from Orthos meaning right, and doxa meaning belief) is typically considered more important. No less a luminary than Martin Luther, in commenting on Romans 12:1, for example, wrote: “Paul does not say: I command you; for he is ...


8

I was just studying this. If you read more about this very topic you'll find that God is talking about shedding innocent blood. Have a look at what God did here: Judges 3:1-2 (New International Version) 1 These are the nations the LORD left to test all those Israelites who had not experienced any of the wars in Canaan 2 (he did this only to teach ...


8

There are a few other instances of God's direct intervention (as opposed to, say, the Gideon story, which can be attributed to clever tactics). At Jericho, the priests with the Ark of the Covenant circled the city walls several times, blew their trumpets, and then the walls collapsed (Joshua 6). Later, in the battle against the Amorites, God rains ...


8

Quakers are considered one of the "peace churches" who oppose war of any kind, and typically refuse to participate in it. However they are also not a denomination which expects everyone in it to do exactly what the church says. See this article for more information. The biblical basis for pacifism is discussed here. I believe that some Quakers have indeed ...


8

Robert Spencer, who is one of the leading Christian authors on Islam has a fascinating insight into the crusades in this video - The Crusades, Fact & Truth. The Crusades have a bad reputation, because, as Spencer explains, Westerners have a healthy attitude of self-criticism. Such self-criticism is completely absent in Islam. Spencer points out that it ...


7

If we go by direct statement, no, the Bible never explicitly states women should serve in active combat. However, as Affable points out, there are plenty of things Scripture doesn't condemn directly that we can assume are wrong by using principles based on extrapolation of direct statements and precedent, in a legal sense. And since the question asked "or ...


7

If you read a bit further on, you see that this particular group of Nephites--known as the Ammonites after Ammon, who converted them to the Gospel--was exceptional. The Ammonites made this covenant to bury their weapons and never take them up again as part of their repentance for past sins before they accepted the gospel, and the rest of the Nephite nation ...


7

Our own wickedness is the cause of the wickedness around the world. Personal fasting is a sign of personal repentance that, it is hoped, will lead God to mitigate similar evils in the world. Pope Francis said this: “We will gather in prayer and in a spirit of penance, invoking God’s great gift of peace upon the beloved nation of Syria and upon each ...


7

In the Bible one of the 10 Commandments says "Thou Shalt Not Kill". However the belief is based on many other references too. Quakers also refuse to swear oaths, on the basis that they always tell the truth and will not swear in God's name or any other. The Quakers formed unarmed pacifist units to supply relief to refugees and ambulances to drive in ...


6

How about more recent history? In the Yom Kippur War, they were attacked by a coalition of states led by Egypt and Syria. The coalition had almost three times the manpower (over 1 million troops against around 400,000 Israeli troops), plus they had anti-air missiles, 20% more armored carriers, 30% more artillery, etc. Yet, Israel lost only around 2,500 ...


6

God's plan had very little to do with the tactics employed. Indeed, God's purpose in downsizing Gideon's army was specifically to de-emphasize the role of man in the conflict. To wit, Judges 7:2 states: The Lord said to Gideon, “The people with you are too many for me to give the Midianites into their hand, lest Israel boast over me, saying, ‘My own ...


5

It's not the fasting that affects violent situations in the Middle East, it's what God leads you to do next. Fasting is a spiritual discipline that helps you focus on God. It's a sacrifice that underscores the seriousness of your prayers. Hunger reminds you to pray and meditate. God responds to prayer by guiding you to actions that you can take to help. You ...


5

Yes, there was / is / will be a war in heaven, as described in Revelation 12:7-9: Then war broke out in heaven. Michael and his angels fought against the dragon, and the dragon and his angels fought back. But he was not strong enough, and they lost their place in heaven. The great dragon was hurled down – that ancient snake called the devil, or Satan, ...


5

Wikis has answered you question quite accurately since you asked for Biblical backup for any conclusions, and he has given you everything that is definitive in the Bible. There are however; several things which are inferred, but are not set in stone. As to the time frame; if you want to call it that, for the war in heaven there are some clues which we can ...


5

The paramilitary organisations did not hold particular theological positions and members were not, in general, especially pious. They were, for the most part, members or adherents of their respective churches. For Protestants this was mainly Presbyterian and Anglican. Religious background, as a proof of allegiance and a guard against infiltration, was ...


4

By the end of the first millenium the Turks, who held control of the Holy Land for four centuries, began to demonstrate a renewed aggression towards non-Muslims. Pilgrims to what are still considered the holiest places in Christianity were being molested and, as the Byzantine empire was not sufficiently strong to stop it (and, in fact, they were showing ...


4

Pacifism was huge in traditional Quakerism, to the point that their home countries (particularly England, where they started) would often get a bit angry with the Quakers for failing to participate in their wars. However, over time, Quakerism as a whole has gotten much more liberal (relative to their starting-point, mind you), and it has become ...


4

The passage you quote is very near the start of a new topic in Paul's letter. 2nd Corinthians 8-9 covers the topic of giving; particularly giving to the church in Jerusalem. The context leading into the passage in question in 2nd Corinthians 10:1-2 (ESV): I, Paul, myself entreat you, by the meekness and gentleness of Christ—I who am humble when ...


4

No. What I think people don't get is that Jesus wasn't saying these things to us. Matthew 24:1 makes it obvious that Jesus was talking to his disciples. "Jesus left the temple and was walking away when his disciples came up to him to call his attention to its buildings." Jesus said "You will hear of wars and rumors of wars..". Not, "People in the future ...


3

First: a translation issue. I am not literate in Greek but I have studied Latin; the Vulgate renders Matt 24:6 as: "audituri autem estis proelia et opiniones proeliorum videte ne turbemini oportet enim haec fieri sed nondum est finis" Notice the noun "bellum, belli" is not in that sentence, but "proelia" (plural form of proelium) which means "battle, combat, ...


3

The text you sited refers specifically to a spiritual battle in which Christians engage because they are Christians. There are spiritual forces that impact people as spiritual beings. So, you confront such things with spiritual warfare. This has nothing to do with any conflict that a person's nation of birth may engage in and require the services of that ...


3

The church has always held that the constitution and the rights established therein are inspired by god including the right to bear arms. As for the BYU-Idaho comment, it is an institution of higher education they can establish what rules they deem necessary to keep their student body safe it was not a statement of the LDS beliefs. Other non-religious and ...


2

Not being able to read God's mind I cannot answer your question as to what his plan was, but I will tell you why I believe he did it. God told the Israelites that if they would serve him he would give them the ability to overcome 100 to 1 odds. Lev 26:7 through 9 KJV 7 And ye shall chase your enemies, and they shall fall before you by the sword. ...


2

I am a Quaker, and as such am regarded in our denomination as a voluntary minister. Quakers do not have any laid down doctrines, creeds, or rules which we must follow. The majority of Quakers do not believe in violence of any kind for any reason. A basic Quaker belief, which was quoted above, is that there is "that of God within everyone", and therefore ...


2

πολέμους καὶ ἀκοὰς πολέμων Wars and rumours/hearings/rumblings of wars. πολέμους is accusative, masculine plural. Seems like it's the first part of a content (or object) clause of the infinitive ἀκούειν ("to hear"). I guess it could also be indicative, but infinitives can be taken as indicatives when context allows. πολέμους and ἀκοὰς are both the same ...



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