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27

In general Romans 12:16-21 (ESV) 16 Live in harmony with one another. Do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly. Never be wise in your own sight. 17 Repay no one evil for evil, but give thought to do what is honorable in the sight of all. 18 If possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all. 19 Beloved, never avenge yourselves, ...


15

It seems that there is an assumption in this question that suggests reason is preferable to judgment. Reason is appropriate when the problem is merely a misunderstanding, but judgment is appropriate when the problem is willful disobedience. It is likely that the place in the temple where the market had been set up was in the Court of the Gentiles. Thus, ...


12

Some Christians would say that the abusiveness of the husband is proof that he is not a Christian, and the wife is therefore able to divorce him based on Paul's words in 1st Corinthians 7. The key point is in bold. 1 Corinthians 7:10-15 ESV To the married I give this charge (not I, but the Lord): the wife should not separate from her husband (but if she ...


11

For one, there's the obvious reference/fulfillment (quoted in John 2:17): Psalm 69:9 (NASB) For zeal for Your house has consumed me, And the reproaches of those who reproach You have fallen on me. My first thought is that Jesus, knowing their hearts (Mt 9:4, Mt 12:25/Lk 11:17), might have known that reasoning with them wouldn't have worked. (e.g. Lk ...


9

Hatred should not be shown towards anyone. For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23) The punishment of homosexuality Likewise also the men, leaving the natural use of the woman, burned in their lust for one another, men with men committing what is shameful, and receiving in themselves the penalty of their error which was ...


8

No, as little as it advocates violence against any other sinner. The story in John 8 holds for homosexuals as well: He who is without sin throw the first stone. And when nobody did: Go therefore and don't sin no more.


7

We often bring our own compromised perspectives to Bible texts and as a result struggle to understand the simplistic significance of a moment. Isaiah 56:7 these I will bring to my holy mountain and give them joy in my house of prayer. Their burnt offerings and sacrifices will be accepted on my altar; for my house will be called a house of prayer for all ...


7

Simon Peter's reaction was inline with his previous self-trusting and impulsive nature, a tendency to rely on self to do what seemed right, rather than a faith that relied on God's promises. This cumulated to the point where he denied the Lord three times, having relied on his own abilities. It was not until the rooster struck that he finally recognized his ...


6

Short answer There is not a single passage in the New Testment that even encourages phisical violence against others. Long answer Yes, at the Old Testment you have some instructions that involves death penalty, for example, for murder (Exodus 21:12), kidnapping (Exodus 21:16), bestiality (Exodus 22:19), adultery (Leviticus 20:10), homosexuality ...


5

First off, a point of terminology. There is no Biblical (or historical, for that matter) basis for the existence of "homosexual people" in the first place. The concept of "sexual orientation" as an inherent trait seems to be a modern concept, invented for political purposes and unsupported by objective facts. The Bible condemns homosexual acts in very ...


5

That is a very good question! Like you, those of us in the historic peace churches do not believe that Jesus' death can or should be avenged by violence. After all, it was Jesus himself who said that vengeance belonged to him alone. And if we were to avenge his death, who is guilty? Rather, who is not guilty? If we really believe that Jesus died for our ...


5

Nnowhere in scripture, or any Christian theology that I know of, are Christians commanded to avenge Christ's killing. In fact there is good evidence to say that God opposes it: "'Vengence is mine', sayeth the Lord". So any Christians who are taking revenge on any group because they believe them to be responsible for Jesus' death are not acting according to ...


5

I should preface my answer by saying this is entirely educated guesswork, as is any answer to this question. Don't take it as divine revelation, but as just one of many views on the events of the time. Some have mentioned that maybe he was being metaphorical, and that the disciples were having one of their (quite frequent) blond moments in taking him ...


3

There are no such problem to show the violence in icons in orthodoxy. There are many icons of martyrs, which shows their suffers on. Like behading or quartering. The sample the that kind of icons are: Icon of Daniel the Prophet and the three children: and St.Sebastian of Mediolan:


3

Peter had an operating category for "Messiah" and it didn't involve the Messiah getting crucified. Even though Jesus repeatedly spoke about dying in Jerusalem, rising again, and so forth, Peter and the rest of the disciples were not expecting him to waltz in, immediately be captured and crucified, and rise from the dead on the third day. Their category for ...


3

Both. The article Why Don’t Jehovah’s Witnesses Go to War? on JW.org addresses this well. On the one hand, they are "neutral" toward governments: Jesus’ disciples obey his command to be “no part of the world” by remaining strictly neutral in political matters. (John 17:16) They do not protest against military actions or interfere with those who choose ...


3

My recollection of the section in Confessions where Augustine discusses the Bible with Ambrose was that they took most of the Old Testament far more figuratively than we do today (it should be noted that one of Augustine's primary objections to Christianity, when he was Manichean, was that the OT is inconsistent and often poorly written). Approaching the ...


2

It seems that the human concept of God from most religions always included a principle of punishment for wrongs. No religion ever thought of a God of grace and unlimited love as expressed in the gospel of Christ, until Christ came. Therefore we do not find significant opposition to God's justice and anger (deemed as cruelty) except as a result of a world ...


2

Jesus advocates using means other than violence (Mt. 5:38-48, Mt. 26:51-52). According to Paul, we shouldn't even be cruel nor hateful towards others: Romans 12:16-21 (ESV) 16 Live in harmony with one another. Do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly. Never be wise in your own sight. 17 Repay no one evil for evil, but give thought to do what ...


2

It is a stretch to call the "retaliation" you mention a response to Jesus' murder. It is more accurately described as a response to differing belief systems, oppression of belief, etc. It is also widely accepted that early Christians were at least themselves convinced that Jesus physically resurrected, so it would take a lot more than psychology based ...


2

Jehovah's Witnesses' pacifism is not predicated on their beliefs about government. In other words, human violence of all kinds, whether government sponsored or not, are evil. Jehovah's Witness believe literally However, I say to you: Continue to love your enemies and to pray for those who persecute you, Matthew 5:44 and Do not avenge ...


2

There are a number of passages in the Old Testament where God is described as supporting the Israelites in their quest to kill or otherwise drive out the native tribes of their land, including places where God is described as forbidding or punishing mercy. Judges 6:16 would be one typical example. These are generally in what are known as the "historical ...


2

The Bible does not give a lot on marriage, nor does it give a lot on divorce. In the book of Matthew Jesus gives us an idea of what God feels about the sanctity of marriage: Matthew 19:3 through 9 NKJV The Pharisees also came unto him, tempting him, and saying unto him, Is it lawful for a man to put away his wife for every cause? And he answered and said ...


1

Does God encourage hurting or killing others in his name in the Bible? The Bible has two parts. The last part (the New Testament) is the culmination of God’s work in man such that believers can have new and eternal life in Jesus. Since Christians have God living in them, they do not need to worry about others. Even though there are those in history who ...


1

The ten plagues corresponded to ten of the major Gods of the Egyptians. The God of the Hebrews wasn't trying to convert anyone, but assert himself as the God above all other gods. 1) God of the Nile, Osiris & Hapi? Your river is blood. 2) Frog-Goddess of Fertility, Heka? You get frogs, you get frogs, everybody gets frogs. 3 & 4) Geb, the god of ...


1

This post made me wonder. Is it true the Orthodox church thinks violence is always sinful no matter the circumstances? The violence in very most cases includes the anger, and hatred to the target of violence, lets say enemy. So that are the reasons why the violence in bad. I said very most because we know the case of the violence without a sin: And the ...


1

Jesus was a human and humans are capable of anger and actions commensurate with that anger. The reason for that being that man was made in the image of God and God also gets angry and acts in accordance; 1 The Flood. 2 In chapter 7 of Joshua we have the story of Achan, and his entire family was stoned to death. 3 The destruction of Jericho. ...


1

My opinion on the matter is based on 2 assumptions: We are humans and we have a tendency to misunderstand events. Knowledge of Jesus' death is very widespread. With these two assumptions in mind, my opinion is almost guessable... As a Christian I believe that Jesus died for my sins, because of my sins; if we were sinless, Jesus would have died for ...


1

Read Romans 1-2 (that's chapters one and two), which contain verses quoted to condemn homosexuality. You will see that Paul is making a point that in condemning we are judging and are guilty of plenty of our own sins. Therefore thou art inexcusable, O man, whosoever thou art that judgest: for wherein thou judgest another, thou condemnest thyself; for ...



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