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17

Yes and no. In historical Christianity, the term for universal salvation is apocatastasis. Apocatastasis refers to the restoration of all things to their original state, which includes the notion of universal reconciliation (even going so far as to insist that Satan himself will eventually be reconciled to God). The word appears in Acts 3:21. "Repent ...


14

Therefore, as one trespass led to condemnation for all men, so one act of righteousness leads to justification and life for all men. —Romans 5:18 For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross. —Colossians 1:19-20 ...


7

There are two different ways to look at this question. On the one hand, outside of the Church there is no salvation (known in Latin as "extra ecclesiam nulla salus", that is an opinion that has been ratified through Council and Creed and it is still true). On the other hand the teachings related to "Baptism of desire/Baptism of blood" muddies the waters ...


7

According to this article (and I'm not expert enough to verify the reliability) the answer seems to be "not any more." A Summary and Some Resources The doctrine of universal salvation (also known as Apokatastasis or Apocatastasis) has usually been considered through the centuries to be heterodox but has become orthodox. It was maintained by the ...


7

Here are a few verses: "For as in Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive." - 1 Corinthians 15:22 (Translation: English Standard Version) "For to this end we toil and strive, because we have our hope set on the living God, who is the Savior of all people, especially of those who believe." - 1 Timothy 4:10 The verses in which ...


5

When we put several passages together to get a fuller picture, we can see in what sense "overlook" is being used. Consider the following two verses, which are similar in scope (from the NET translation): Rom. 3:25 God publicly displayed him at his death as the mercy seat accessible through faith. This was to demonstrate his righteousness, because God ...


4

I identify as an evangelical universalist. I don't know if you'll find this worthwhile, but here's my take. It sounds an awful lot like a figure of speech to me. If it is, it's best not to draw too many conclusions based on it. (Bart Ehrman left the faith because the mustard seed isn't really the smallest of all seeds.) In support of the figure of speech ...


4

Going back to the Greek translation of the passage, the phrase "they will be punished with eternal destruction" is somewhat disingenuous in it's English phrasing. The word "destruction" in Greek is "olethron" - not annihilation, but destruction "with a positive connotation, as in the destruction required for and preceding renewal." (via Wikipedia). A ...


3

How does Calvinism explain how an omniscient, omnipotent, and omnibenevolent creator could NOT have a plan for universal salvation? ... it seems illogical that a loving creator with perfect and complete knowledge could be considered incapable or unmotivated to ensure the eventual salvation of all His created earthly beings. Understanding God's ...


2

I will first concisely explain the traditional Arminian and Calvinist views, directly addressing (in bold type) the OP's question in the section on Calvinism. I will then introduce one helpful and popular way of comparing the distinctions between traditional Arminian, Calvinist, and Universalist views. At last, I will provide two example alternate views, ...


2

pteranodon, Your question is vast. It covers at least two doctrines in the bible—Conversion and Justification, each of which deserves much time in explaining. But, if you are willing, I'd like to tackle your query. Defining Decision Theology Divine Monergists (Lutherans & Calvinists) use the term "decision theology" to describe a particularly Arminian ...


1

I also identify as an evangelical universalist and would echo Tim's answer here regarding the context of stillbirth. I thought I'd also add an excerpt from George Macdonald (19th-century Scottish author, poet, Christian minister; spiritual mentor of C.S. Lewis) related to this question, as he is a figure many/most evangelical universalists resonate with. ...


1

While not a universalist, I can posit that a universalist inerrantist would principally invoke the classification of hyperbole, and say that for someone to abandon such apostolic potential to enter the messianic community was for the individual ever so tragic. Logically to never have been born, at least if it meant to never have been conceived, could never ...


1

Universal reconciliation is the phrase that describes what is clearly stated in Colossians 1:20. "and through Him to reconcile all to Him (making peace through the blood of His cross), through Him, whether those on the earth or those in the heavens" (Colossians 1:20) It has nothing to do with an "immortal soul," as you say, because souls die (Ezekiel 18:4,...


1

Origen c.250 was the first systematic theologian. In addition to his exegetical commentaries, he offered some opinions about salvation in his book De Principiis (Book I) Here is an extract. Ch. and verse divisions in the text are a modern innovation, and Origen's quotes are without them. This from Chapter 6. (2) "From all which I am of opinion, so far as ...


1

Thanks for thinking about such topics! I was very intrigued when I first heard of this idea, and I've grown to accept it over the years. My pastor has written a fantastic article on why he believes in universalism, and it has a bunch of verses supporting this said belief: http://www.tsdowntown.com/images/essays/all_things_new_and_a_place_we_call_hell.pdf ...



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