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Why did Jesus have to leave for the Holy Spirit to come? John 16:7 Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you. Jesus says that the Holy Spirit will not come unless after he departs, Jesus sends him. Jesus has to ...


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Thomas Aquinas gives four reasons: When "he was still living among them ... they were not prepared, for carnal love is contrary to the Holy Spirit, since the Spirit is spiritual love." He connects this with 2 Corinthians 5: "And he died for all so that those who live should no longer live for themselves but for him who died for them and was raised. So then ...


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Gnostic Light The word Spirit means Breath. How did the Holy Spirit come into existence? God who is Existence took a breath. Who created the Holy Spirit? God did it is his breath. Did the Holy Spirit exist from the beginning or was it God who created the Holy Spirit? The beginning started when he started to breath. It was God who took his breath. If it ...


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3 And there shall be no more curse: but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it; and his servants shall serve him: It's quite simple. The "throne" (power and glory) is that of Jesus Christ and God the Father. Christ received all that the Father had, including his power and glory. And not only did Christ receive this, but the redeemed will ...


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Revelation 3:21 To him that overcometh will I grant to sit with me in my throne, even as I also overcame, and am set down with my Father in his throne. This verse shows that the throne belongs to Jesus Christ along with his father. We interpret it through this verse. Kind of a short answer but it gets the point accross.


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Actually, more appropriate would be to notice that many of the early church fathers were either Platonist or Neo-Platonist. St. Augustine being the most Platonist, Christian of them all. In fact, his "City of God" is nothing but an allusion to and offshoot of Plato's "Republic." And as far as belief of the trinity, these early church fathers actually derived ...


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How about Jesus' own explanation? I and my Father are one. [John 10:30 KJV] If ye had known me, ye should have known my Father also: and from henceforth ye know him, and have seen him. Philip saith unto him, Lord, shew us the Father, and it sufficeth us. Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he ...


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Your consternation stems from two problems, first is the difficulty of translating the Bible into English, and the second is one is in Greek and the other is in Hebrew Collossians:1:15, and Corinthians 4:4 G1504 εἰκών eikōn i-kone' From G1503; a likeness, that is, (literally) statue, profile, or (figuratively) representation, resemblance: - ...


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A professor of postgraduate studies at Wheaton explained the difference to me as follows. (This represents an Evangelical understanding.) Mankind was made according to the image of God. Jesus is the image of God.


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It's a matter of degrees. Think of the image of God in human beings (< L. Imago Dei, Hebrew: צֶלֶם אֱלֹהִים; tzelem elohim, lit. "image of God") as being a finite representation of divinity. What is of infinite degree in God is finite in man (humankind). In the so-called "personality-purpose approach" to the image of God in man, the three key ...


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Answer from a specifically Catholic viewpoint: The Catechism of the Catholic Church has many references to humans as images of God, but only a few that I have found to Jesus as the image of God: At the time appointed by God, the only Son of the Father, the eternal Word, that is, the Word and substantial Image of the Father, became incarnate; without ...



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