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13

According to mainstream Christianity, the Holy Spirit is a person of the Trinity - loosely speaking a part of God. Therefore he was not created. He is eternal, without beginning and without end. This is best (though not necessarily most understandably) summed up in the Athenasian Creed: Such as the Father is; such is the Son; and such is the Holy Ghost. ...


10

There are countless works already done on Trinity. Inspired by all these existing works, here is how we may address the question to whom Jesus prays to. Jesus never said "I am God" nor "I am the Father" but said "I and my Father are one". The New Testament always address Jesus as the Lord, the Christ, the Word of God and the Son of God. One with Father? ...


10

Update: The short answer: No; it seems that partialism is not a "real," historically defined heresy. Explanation: Before writing this post, I checked the applicable titles from among my usual textual sources -- a variety of historic theological works that are now in the public domain and available online. When that yielded no references to "partialism," I ...


9

One could do a great deal worse than quote another answer: There are several heresies that one needs to be careful of when discussing a topic such as this. For example, Modalism which declares that God is not three distinct persons, but that He merely reveals himself in three different forms. Or, Arianism which declares that Christ and the Holy Spirit ...


9

It is problematic whenever we attempt to separate the inseparable Trinity, so let us acknowledge that to begin with. The Bible never seems to suggest that the Holy Triune God has the capacity to love in varying measures. Indeed, God only knows one way to love. His love is complete and total--not partial. His love, like He Himself, does not increase or ...


9

Trinity is a Dogma of the Catholic Church. Hence as with all dogmas a Catholic is bound to believe it in order to maintain the bond of faith. You have asked: if someone is not 100% comfortable..... Who is this someone? If they are non-baptised person, Catholic church has no official stand regarding them, only God will know. If they are baptized Catholic ...


9

The simplest answer is that denying the Trinity diminishes the person of Jesus. There is an enormous gap between saying that Jesus is the Almighty God and saying that he is one of God's creations. Even if Jesus was God's first and greatest creation, he would still be much less awesome than if he were God himself. So, it is understandable that trinitarians ...


8

The gesture you describe is indeed the Sign of the Cross. Making that gesture is called "crossing oneself". The Sign of the Cross is called a sacramental. These are "sacred signs which bear a resemblance to the sacraments. They signify effects, particularly of a spiritual nature, which are obtained through the intercession of the Church." [CCC 1667] When ...


7

The theory of Matriarchal Holy Spirit is a Gnostic Heresy. It doesn't have anything to do with the scriptures. Jesus addresses the Holy Spirit by the masculine gender in the following verses of John 14:26 (But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you.) ...


7

For Christians that are creationists, and that accept the doctrine of the Trinity, yes. From CARM.org, which believes and advocates both doctrines. The idea that Jesus is Creator is one of the arguments to support that Jesus is God. * CARM is not alone in this belief, but I decided to link to only one reference. To anyone who rejects the idea of ...


7

In theory, all Nicene Christians are Trinitarian, based on their assent to the Nicene Creed, which states among other things that they believe in: God, the Father Almighty, maker of heaven and earth one Lord, Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son the Holy Spirit. Furthermore, any Christians who subscribe to the Athansian Creed will also state: For ...


7

If you look at the role of Jesus especially at the very end of time and the beginning of eternity (eternity for us, that is to say) he does not seem that different after all. When Jesus returns, he will not return as the contemporary hippie Jesus. That image is a product of modern humanistic culture and not the Jesus of scriptures. He will return as the King ...


6

However, most Christians believe that God exists as three persons in one God-head. This may or may not be true. I think it is more true to say that nominal acquiescence of a statement of trinitarianism is widely understood as a 'red line' for acceptance by many denominations. The Nicine creed for example is clearly trinatarian, and so are many ...


6

In the Nicene Creed, one of the oldest formulations of the Faith, and one which is repeated every Sunday by a large portion of Christianity, it says of the Holy Spirit: I believe in the Holy Spirit, ... who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified, who spake by the prophets In theory then, all three members of the Trinity are ...


6

YHVH is not one person. An Examination of Zechariah 2:8-11 In Zech. 2:8, it is written, For thus said YHVH of hosts, "After glory He sent me to the nations who spoiled you, for he who touches you touches the apple of His eye. כִּי כֹה אָמַר יְהוָה צְבָאוֹת אַחַר כָּבֹוד שְׁלָחַנִי אֶל־הַגּוֹיִם הַשֹּׁלְלִים אֶתְכֶם כִּי הַנֹּגֵעַ בָּכֶם נֹגֵעַ ...


6

As far as we know, he did not use this analogy. It does not appear in the extant writings attributed to him, nor in early hagiographies. There are several places in these documents where a shamrock metaphor wouldn't go completely amiss, and yet it doesn't seem to appear anywhere. In the Confession attributed to Patrick, he talks a lot about how he is a ...


6

It sounds like a heretical understanding sometimes called Partialism, which suggested that the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit are parts of the one God. Partialism contrasts the The Athanasian Creed. Namely: And the Catholic Faith is this, that we worship one God in Trinity and Trinity in Unity. Neither confounding the Persons, nor dividing the ...


6

I and my Father are one. John 10:30 Jesus and the Father had the plan of redemption from the beginning of this world. Their plans are the same because they are the same in thought. They love us immensely and equally. Their very essence is love. Whoever does not love does not know God, because God is love 1 John 4:8 If you read through 1 ...


6

Your question is whether God could, or perhaps should, have chosen to save us other than by becoming incarnate himself. To begin with, the Incarnation is an act of grace. From the teaching we have received in the sacred scriptures, we know that the coming of God into the world, in the person of Jesus Christ, was a free and unmerited gift of God's love. ...


6

In the following Scriptures, Jesus speaks of the separation of persons of the Trinity: John 5:30 through 32 KJV 30 I can of mine own self do nothing: as I hear, I judge: and my judgment is just; because I seek not mine own will, but the will of the Father which hath sent me. 31 If I bear witness of myself, my witness is not true. 32 There ...


5

As Matt said in his OP: "some of Christianity believe God and Jesus to be one being, whereas some believe them to be separate and distinct beings". Yes, these are the prevailing opinions among χριστιανους (Christians, followers of a messianic Jesus; see, e.g., Matt. 1:16; Acts 11:26). But there are other followers of the teachings of a Jesus they see ...


5

The theological term for what you are describing is called Kenosis- from "an emptying." As you suggest, Philippians 2, in which the Scripture says that "though He was God, he thought equality with God was not something to be grasped," so he emptied himself and became obedient unto death, even the death on a Cross. That God himself would choose to empty ...


5

No, at least in the context of mainstream Nicene (including Protestant, Catholic and Orthodox) I don't think there is any teaching about this. The reason being simple: it is a non issue. The very idea of this is not based on a classic understanding of the Trinity at all and therefore is not a problem for normal Trinatarian theology. The basic idea here is ...


5

In order to understand the evidence against the Trinity, you first need to understand the nature of the Trinity - that God is three persons who make up one God. You also need to understand the biblical basis FOR the Trinity. It is founded on a number of clear pieces of evidence: There is clear biblical evidence that Jesus is God. There is clear biblical ...


5

John 1:1,14 is the classic proof text of the eternality of the Son. in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. Through Him all things were Made, and by him was nothing made that was made. John 1:14 goes on to say that this is Jesus. Furthermore the creeds are very clear that he was begotten not made, which ...


5

In addition to Steven Doggart's answer (with which I wholeheartedly agree) I suggest that there is considerable emotional appeal in the idea that God himself would voluntarily give up his position, enter this fallen world with all the frailties of a human and sacrificed all for his lost and rebellious creation. As trinitarians we believe in a God who ...


5

But the title seems to refer to God the Trinity. Is that correct? No it does not. First trinity is not God. Trinity is how God is. That is trinity is not a person, it is a relationship. So Mary cannot be the mother of Trinity. Secondly it would be nice if you know the context why and when this was declared as a dogma. The problem rose when Aryan said the ...


4

It does sound like Partialism eg akin to the 3 leaf clover idea (see above you-tube for an entertaining explanation of that :) !! ) I prefer the metaphor of a cube to explain the Trinity to those who may need something concrete to assist in their undestanding. There we have Length, Breadth and Height. The Length is NOT the Breadth is NOT the Height. They ...


4

Scope: This post offers an answer for the first part of the question, as I understand it: whether or not Jesus' identification of himself as the Son of God makes the Trinity an instance of Partialism. The Short Answer No, it doesn't. The fact that there is no earthly analogue for the Trinity makes it difficult to accurately describe in human language, so a ...



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