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13

It depends on who you ask. That's because it depends upon how you interpret the meaning of certain Biblical passages. Both Trinitarians and Non-trinitarians feel very strongly that their doctrine is taught clearly in the Bible. Trinitarians will answer, "Yes, Jesus did teach the doctrine of the trinity." Non-trinitarians will answer, "No, Jesus never ...


12

However, most Christians believe that God exists as three persons in one God-head. This may or may not be true. I think it is more true to say that nominal acquiescence of a statement of trinitarianism is widely understood as a 'red line' for acceptance by many denominations. The Nicine creed for example is clearly trinatarian, and so are many ...


9

This is one of the popular misconception of trinity and incarnation. Jesus as Logos (The Word) is divine. He existed in that form for eternity in the Trinity. But the humanity of Christ did NOT exist before incarnation. Humanity of Christ consists of his human soul and body. Humans are made up of soul and body, so when Christ became human, ie., when he took ...


9

There is one God who has revealed himself in three persons. The vast majority of Christians across all major sects agree that Jesus is both the Son of God and God. This has been articulated many mays, but is not easy to explain in the confines of language. He is not the "son" as is a physical offspring as the result of sexual relations, but in another ...


8

Leo the Great wrote for the Council of Chalcedon in 451, It does not belong to the same nature to say, "I and the Father are one," and to say, "The Father is greater than I." For although there is in the Lord Jesus Christ a single person who is of God and of man, the insults shared by both have their source in one thing, and the glory that is shared in ...


8

You have a couple different questions, but the main one seems to be in regard to Abraham and Jesus. Abraham and Jesus Abraham is only the ancestor of Jesus in His incarnation. Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant branches of Christianity teach that God is and has always been a Trinity of Father, Son and Spirit. The Son became a man and entered into His ...


7

If you look at the role of Jesus especially at the very end of time and the beginning of eternity (eternity for us, that is to say) he does not seem that different after all. When Jesus returns, he will not return as the contemporary hippie Jesus. That image is a product of modern humanistic culture and not the Jesus of scriptures. He will return as the King ...


7

Trinitarians believe that Jesus being human does not contradict his status as God (or as the Spirit). Even though Jesus is God, he made himself into physical human being, and through this he was able to experience life fully as a man. Philippians 2:5-8 KJV Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: Who, being in the form of God, thought it ...


6

Fr. Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary gives this definition of Semi-Arianism: The teaching of certain theologians who, after the Council of Nicaea (A.D. 325), sought a compromise between Arianism and the doctrine of Christ's consubstantiality with the Father. They were led by Basil, Bishop of Ancyra, and their sympathies were toward orthodoxy, although ...


6

In the following Scriptures, Jesus speaks of the separation of persons of the Trinity: John 5:30 through 32 KJV 30 I can of mine own self do nothing: as I hear, I judge: and my judgment is just; because I seek not mine own will, but the will of the Father which hath sent me. 31 If I bear witness of myself, my witness is not true. 32 There ...


6

The answer to this, in regards to Jesus Christ's divinity, would be: There is little to no difference. The differences in Mormon theology do not alter the way Christ's Divinity is regarded by Mormons vs. the regard given by Trinitarians. Trinitarians and Mormons both view Christ as Divine, and the Most Divine Possible. I will provide some background, ...


6

But the title seems to refer to God the Trinity. Is that correct? No it does not. First trinity is not God. Trinity is how God is. That is trinity is not a person, it is a relationship. So Mary cannot be the mother of Trinity. Secondly it would be nice if you know the context why and when this was declared as a dogma. The problem rose when Aryan said the ...


5

Form the outset, we must remember that Yeshua is both God AND man. From Isaiah 9:6 we see— For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace. A child (Yeshua) could not be given; the ...


5

For more than 3,000 years, Jews have repeated Deuteronomy 6:4. “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God is one Lord.” This sacred passage has been held in high esteem and memorized by Jews for centuries. Jesus also taught about “the only true God” John 17:3 And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou ...


5

Brief Historical Introduction The Nicene Creed originally did not include the words "and the Son" (called the Filioque clause) because it was based on the words of Scripture in John 15:26 (τὸ ἐκ τοῦ Πατρὸς ἐκπορευόμενον). It was added later, and not by an ecumenical council (it was originally inserted by the Third Synod of Toledo). Not to mention, even ...


5

Al-Hallaj was a sufi mystic from ~900 years after the time of Jesus. He was enamored of the Jesus he knew of, but his own sources and influence were primarily Islamic and his idea of who Jesus was matches the non-divine prophet of Islamic teaching rather that the divine savior of Christianity. He tried to live after the pattern of the stories he had and used ...


5

The main reason that it is important to Protestants, that Jesus is the son of God, is because that is the basic precept on which their salvation depends. If Jesus were not deity, (or God) he could not keep the promises he made concerning salvation. All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation. example: John 10:15 through 18 As the Father ...


5

How many Gods do we have? One and only one! How many persons are there in God? Three and only three! Who are them? Father, Son and Holy Spirit. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit (Matthew 28:19, NIV) Do we worship them separately? NO! Because they are ONE. ...


5

Regarding the term ἐκπορεύομαι We have to keep in mind that Trinitarian doctrine and the technical terminology surrounding it did not stabilize until the Fourth Century A.D. The creed commonly called the Nicene Creed would be better termed the “Nicene-Constantinopolitan” Creed, since it incorporates material that was elaborated not only in the ...


4

The biggest thing about these councils specifically is the addition of God being three persons, which "persons" were to be included in the term "God", and the evolution of such. For example, the Apostle's Creed which pre-dates the first of these councils (Nicea) says nothing about God being more than one nor anything about multiple "persons" being "God". ...


4

When framed in terms of what can't be found in the Bible: Almost nothing can't be found in the Bible / You can find almost anything in the Bible. A wide variety of established beliefs are "Biblical" because, like most any non-technical document, it's vastly multi-interpretable. (And even technical language is multi-interpretable.) The creeds primarily ...


4

I would like to add some theological background to this answer from the Catholic perspective (and naturally, I would invite Orthodox readers to contribute their own perspective). First, some historical background: As the original question points out, the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed was originally written in Greek. Although the fundamental concepts in ...


4

I speak only for myself here. If you read through the OT quickly, you will "see the forest for the trees", that is, you will get an overarching picture of who God is and what His purpose for us is. This will often get lost if you focus only on the details of the OT. Many scholars have discussed the way God interacted with an ancient Near Eastern people, ...


4

No, neither the Jews (those left after the northern exile) nor the entirety of the Hebrews (all those of the faith before the northern exile) held to any concept of a trinity. The ancient egyptians had a trinity, but not the Hebrews. In fact, they held to a strict monotheism as taught by scripture. Deuteronomy 6:4 The Scriptures 1998+ (4) Hear, O ...


4

The doctrine you are describing is called Adoptionism. It is one of many Nontrinitarian doctrines. Nontrinitarianism is a catch-all category for all forms of Christology which do not agree with orthodox Trinitarian doctrine. Although some forms of Nontrinitarianism are adhered to by some mainstream denominations today, such as LDS and Jehova's Witnesses, ...


4

From a Christian Evangelical perspective, the answer to three of your questions is yes, and the answer to one of your questions is no. Was Jesus present at the beginning of time? Yes. John 1:1-2: "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He was in the beginning with God." Jesus (again, according to Evangelical ...


4

Jesus' divinity is not strictly a protestant assertion: The Blessed Trinity (Roman Catholic). Jesus' divinity is crucial to his message. He made such assertions, and if we are to trust anything he says, then everything he says must be true. Similarly, if we are to trust anything the Biblical authors said, we must trust all of it. The testimony of scripture ...


4

Aquinas addresses the question from different angles a number of places in the Summa Theologica, in various parts of the "Treatise on the Most Holy Trinity" (First Part, Questions 27–43). The fundamental question is answered more or less directly in Question 27, "The Procession of the Divine Persons". Article 2 of this question, "Whether any ...


4

Firstly, if Jesus is God, it is of course impossible for Him to blaspheme against His own law. Secondly, Jesus did not overtly claim to be God directly and consequently inevitably stumble the lost sheep of Israel that He was sent to. He answered the question: The high priest said to him, “I charge you under oath by the living God: Tell us if you are ...


4

The question, as it stands, really isn't soluable. Reason #1: The Crucifixion raises other Trinitarian questions First and foremost, the Trinity itself is hard enough to understand. There is no good analogy and any attempt to make one will necessarily fail by over emphasizing oneness or threeness. Worse, the Crucifixion and death of Christ means that ...



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